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Tanks Storage

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991 | SONNI EFRON and MARLA CONE
The Orange County district attorney's office filed suit Tuesday against Exxon Corp., alleging that the oil company has failed to comply with a major pollution law enacted to prevent fuel leaks. Prosecutors allege in the suit, filed in Orange County Superior Court, that Exxon has violated a state law that requires companies to obtain permits and monitor underground fuel tanks for leaks. Eight Exxon stations in Anaheim, Costa Mesa, Fountain Valley and Garden Grove are involved, the suit says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1989 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The city's lagging effort to inspect thousands of underground storage tanks--many of them leaking--got a boost Tuesday from Mayor Tom Bradley, who announced plans to nearly double the Fire Department's inspection staff. "This is a serious threat. There are 15,000 of these underground storage tanks," Bradley told a City Hall news conference. "They present a real danger to the community, and we are going to eliminate this danger."
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
More than three years after the state's original deadline, only about half of an estimated 142,000 underground storage tanks in California have been tested, a Times survey of local agencies has found. As a result, thousands of tanks that leak toxic chemicals into ground water remain undetected because local governments--notably the City of Los Angeles--have failed to act promptly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN
A $1.4-million water tank that serves Val Verde and was severely damaged in the Northridge quake will be replaced. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Works will front the money for the huge tank, but the federal government will reimburse the department for all but about $57,000 of the cost. The tank will hold 1.28 million gallons--more than enough to meet the domestic and fire suppression needs of about 700 Val Verde residents.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill and Kathleen Hall certainly have nothing against environmental regulations. After all, their Gardena business was built on federal and state rules that require the upgrading of underground fuel tanks to protect against leaks that contaminate subterranean water. "We saw there was a need," Kathleen Hall said, "and we invested heavily" seven years ago to start a company that installs tanks and treats polluted soil.
NEWS
June 24, 1988
Three huge gasoline tanks exploded at a depot in Guadalupe, Mexico, killing at least two people, officials said. Fifteen people were hospitalized with burns, including four in critical condition, and 10,000 people were evacuated from their homes in the industrial area near Monterrey in northeast Mexico, 440 miles from Mexico City. Several vehicles parked near the tanks turned to molten metal as the temperature near the fire at times reached 5,400 degrees, Nuevo Leon state police officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994
Rep. Esteban E. Torres (D-Pico Rivera) has called on the secretary of defense to close a jet fuel storage depot in Norwalk, saying the facility is no longer necessary. "The Norwalk Tank Farm--a facility with a capacity to store 36 million gallons of highly toxic jet fuel--has outlived its usefulness," Torres wrote in a letter to Defense Secretary William Perry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A Superior Court judge Tuesday refused to halt the operation of three jet fuel tanks at John Wayne Airport despite the potential danger of an airplane crash there, saying the shutdown would be too much of a burden on the county. Business owners in the Koll-Irvine Center Business Park hoped to stop the airport from operating the fuel tanks while a lawsuit they have filed against the county and airlines winds its way through the courts. But Superior Court Judge Ronald L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON
Gasoline that leaked from storage tanks at the city's two public golf courses has contaminated about 600 tons of earth and will cost up to $75,000 to clean up. The City Council approved the cleaning expenditures Tuesday after golf course officials said the fuel contamination had spread at the H.G. (Dad) Miller Golf Course in west Anaheim and at the Anaheim Hills Golf Course.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County prosecutors are drafting a multimillion-dollar civil suit against Unocal, one of the nation's oil giants, accusing the firm of endangering Orange County's water supply and public health because 79 of its stations have allegedly failed to comply with a major pollution law. District attorney's officials confirmed Friday that they intend to file the suit as soon as paperwork is completed and will seek a shutdown of the stations until the company complies.
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