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NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Medical experts realized long ago that there's no point in guessing how low Dr. Mehmet Oz will sink in pushing patent cures, fad diets and unproven health "miracles" on his Oprah-produced TV show. But his appearance this weekend in an NFL promotional campaign looks like some sort of a milestone. The 30-second spot , which we viewed during Sunday's Denver-Washington game, is part of the league's "Together We Make Football" ad campaign, which aims to show how marvelously the sport is integrated into our daily lives.
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NEWS
December 21, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Are tanning beds still popular? Apparently so. A new study finds 18% of women and 6.5% of men in America say they use tanning beds, even though indoor tanning has been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer. Researchers at the University of Minnesota based their findings on surveys of 2,869 white people between age 18 and 64 who were asked about their recent indoor tanning habits. In addition, the study says, most didn’t know that using tanning beds could increase their chances of getting skin cancer.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
“Tanning kills,” warns Travis Kidner, a skin cancer surgeon, in a recent Times Op-Ed article advising against tanning beds. Still, tanning salons continue to attract customers, many of whom are young, white women undeterred by the dangerous risks. Science Now's Karen Kaplan reported : “The latest evidence comes from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a research letter published online Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine, they report that 29.3% of white high school girls went to an indoor tanning parlor at least once a year, and 16.7% went 'frequently' -- at least 10 times in a 12-month period.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The nearly 3 in 10 white girls of high school age who use indoor tanning beds likely will soon come face-to-face with a new and stiffer warning aimed at young people eager to get that sun-kissed glow in a hurry: Don't. Faced with mounting evidence that indoor tanning greatly increases cancer risk among younger users, the Food & Drug Administration proposed Monday to require tanning booths and beds to carry a warning encouraging young people not to use the devices. Businesses that use devices and beds that use UV-A and UV-B rays to promote tanning currently are required to post signs warning consumers about health risks that come with their use. But the devices themselves are exempt from pre-market review.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California's beleaguered indoor tanning industry, after being hit with a new federal tax, is fighting to hold on to a sizable piece of its clientele: teenagers. On Monday, a state Senate committee approved a bill that would make California the first state in the nation to ban those under age 18 from using ultraviolet tanning beds and similar devices. The bill's author, state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), shepherded the bill out of the Business and Professions Committee in time to meet an evening deadline for passage.
SCIENCE
April 20, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
As many as a third of young people who use tanning beds may be addicted to the behavior, scientists report. Tanning activates the same parts of the brain triggered by drug dependence. As many as a third of young people who use indoor tanning facilities may be addicted to the behavior, researchers reported Monday. The findings are the latest to suggest that tanning, whether natural or indoors, activates the same parts of the brain triggered by drug dependence. The study screened college students using two standard questionnaires designed to assess addiction and modified to assess tanning behavior.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2009 | By Kim Geiger
Citing concerns over skin cancer, Senate Democrats inserted a last-minute provision into their healthcare overhaul that would tax the use of tanning beds. The 10% sales tax would be imposed on individuals who purchase tanning services, but would not apply to what the bill called "phototherapy by a licensed medical professional." Most tanning salons are not staffed by medical personnel. The tanning tax would help pay for the massive overhaul by raising an estimated $2.7 billion over 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
Clearing his desk of more than 140 bills, Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday barred minors from using tanning beds, required health insurers to include coverage for autism, approved limits on police actions at sobriety checkpoints and rejected legalization of industrial hemp. Working late to meet a midnight deadline for signing or vetoing legislation this year, Brown had not yet announced his decisions on whether to outlaw the open carrying of handguns in public or to extend $100 million in tax credits to Hollywood productions filmed in California.
OPINION
August 5, 2013 | By Travis Kidner
As a surgical oncologist, I'm usually the one delivering the bad news. But this time I was the recipient. Nine days earlier, my dermatologist had taken a biopsy from a small pink dot on my back, and now the results were available. It was, he told me, malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. I envisioned the irony of my obituary: "Melanoma surgeon dies of melanoma. " Specializing in the care of melanoma patients makes me all too aware of the facts. I know that melanoma is one of only a few cancers whose incidence is increasing.
OPINION
August 5, 2013 | By Travis Kidner
As a surgical oncologist, I'm usually the one delivering the bad news. But this time I was the recipient. Nine days earlier, my dermatologist had taken a biopsy from a small pink dot on my back, and now the results were available. It was, he told me, malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. I envisioned the irony of my obituary: "Melanoma surgeon dies of melanoma. " Specializing in the care of melanoma patients makes me all too aware of the facts. I know that melanoma is one of only a few cancers whose incidence is increasing.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The nearly 3 in 10 white girls of high school age who use indoor tanning beds likely will soon come face-to-face with a new and stiffer warning aimed at young people eager to get that sun-kissed glow in a hurry: Don't. Faced with mounting evidence that indoor tanning greatly increases cancer risk among younger users, the Food & Drug Administration proposed Monday to require tanning booths and beds to carry a warning encouraging young people not to use the devices. Businesses that use devices and beds that use UV-A and UV-B rays to promote tanning currently are required to post signs warning consumers about health risks that come with their use. But the devices themselves are exempt from pre-market review.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You would think that people who were diagnosed with melanoma -- the most deadly form of skin cancer -- would be meticulously careful about using sunscreen, avoiding tanning salons and generally protecting their skin. You would be wrong, researchers said Monday. Melanoma tumors develop in the skin cells that make melanin, the brown pigment that protects skin from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is the least common type of skin cancer, but it can be the most dangerous.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Indoor tanning raises the risk of skin cancer. Governments are acting, with restrictions on use of the facilities spreading across the U.S. and countries around the world. That's the finding of a report just published online in the Archives of Dermatology after its Colorado authors conducted an exhaustive search on the Web for all tanning-related legislation worldwide. Few countries go as far as Brazil, where indoor tanning has been banned for everyone since 2011. (The ban is for cosmetic purposes, not therapeutic ones such as psoriasis treatment, for which UV exposure can be helpful because it tamps down the immune system.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Gina McIntyre
Random facts we learned on Sunday's episode of "True Blood": -- Vampires cannot use tanning beds to commit suicide. -- Bleach is not a normal ingredient in Merlotte's gumbo recipe. The suicidal vampire, of course, is Tara, who's still struggling to come to terms with her new nature, and it's Lafayette, naturally, who inexplicably poisons a pot of stew before glancing up and catching a familiar-looking demon reflected back at him in the mirror. What did Jesus say about that old dark magic again?
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The New Jersey woman known as the "tanning bed mom" had a chuckle when her likeness was spun off into a "Saturday Night Live"parody. But she's probably not laughing about the latest attempt to profit from her notoriety. A Connecticut novelty company called Hero Builders has begun selling a “tanorexic action figure" that it says is based on Patricia Krentcil. But here's the problem: It looks nothing like her. In fact, the doll barely looks like a woman. It does bear some resemblance, however, to a transgendered Frankenstein aiming for the Barbie look.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The more you use a tanning bed, the higher your risk of deadly skin cancers, according to research presented at an international cancer conference this week. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard University in Boston followed 73,494 nurses who participated in a health study from 1989 to 2009, tracking their tanning-bed habits during high school and college, as well as between the ages of 25 and 35. They also tracked overall average usage during those two periods in relation to basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma -- three different skin cancers that are each named after the type of cells they affect.
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Self-tanning products might be keeping women from hitting the beach and tanning beds and courting dangerous UV radiation exposure, a study finds. A study released online Monday in the Archives of Dermatology surveyed 415 women about their use of self-tanners and how often they tanned under the sun or in tanning beds in the previous year, plus their attitudes toward tanned skin. While some health experts hail self-tanners as a safer alternative than tanning via the sun and beds, others worry that using the product compels people to seek out those conventional and harmful methods more often.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
It looks as if the New Jersey tanning bed mom is enjoying her day in the sun. Patricia Krentcil was the subject of a Weekend Update segment on "Saturday Night Live" in which Oscar-nominee Kristen Wiig posed as the now-notorious tanner. "The whole thing was hysterical," Krentcil told the New York Post on Sunday. "It was well done. " Photos: Tanning bed mom in court The comment suggests that Krentcil might have a biting sense of humor of her own: The entire skit played off the notion that Krentcil, 44, has cooked herself to a crisp.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The case of the New Jersey woman accused of taking her young daughter into a tanning bed and letting her burn appears to be raising a question for many people. The question isn't: Did she or didn't she? The question is: Could this woman be a tanorexic? Patricia Krentcil, 44, pleaded not guilty earlier this week to child endangerment charges for allegedly putting her daughter in a Nutley, N.J., tanning bed. (Some reports say the girl is 5, others say she's 6.)
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