Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTartuffe
IN THE NEWS

Tartuffe

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By David C. Nichols
“Tartuffe” returns to A Noise Within's repertoire after 22 years, and it proves worth the wait. Molière's deathless assault on religious hypocrisy could hardly be more pertinent at present, which gives Julia Rodriguez-Elliott's elegantly quirky staging an extra soupçon of satirical thrust. And there's ample comic skewering afoot, from the opening group pavane to composer Robert Oriol's evocative faux-French music onward. Taking a light-handed approach to Richard Wilbur's venerable translation, Rodriguez-Elliott and her reliable design and acting forces run the gamut, from drollery to slapstick and back again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By David C. Nichols
“Tartuffe” returns to A Noise Within's repertoire after 22 years, and it proves worth the wait. Molière's deathless assault on religious hypocrisy could hardly be more pertinent at present, which gives Julia Rodriguez-Elliott's elegantly quirky staging an extra soupçon of satirical thrust. And there's ample comic skewering afoot, from the opening group pavane to composer Robert Oriol's evocative faux-French music onward. Taking a light-handed approach to Richard Wilbur's venerable translation, Rodriguez-Elliott and her reliable design and acting forces run the gamut, from drollery to slapstick and back again.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
We're in Kentucky, 1870, at the home of that upstandin' citizen, Organ Pernell-- Organ ? Welcome to "Tartuffe" at the Old Globe, y'all. That change of spelling (from the French Orgon to the substitute Organ) is one of many transformations undergone by this "Tartuffe." The playground that director Craig Noel has chosen for Moliere's phony preacher man, Tartuffe, is a lush antebellum setting--a grand, airy house with porches, handsomely designed by Richard Seger and sunlit by Kent Dorsey.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | David Ng
Like, oh mon Dieu! Moliere's 17th century comedy "Tartuffe" gets airlifted to a wealthy enclave of the San Fernando Valley in a new theatrical production that's, like, so totally amazing. This postmodern retelling at the Theatre @ Boston Court in Pasadena is intended to be divisive to the max, but risk-seeking audiences will be glad they donned their designer thinking caps for this highly original deconstruction of the classic French play. Set in a tacky suburban mansion, "Tartuffe" follows the plight of Orgon (Tim Cummings)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | David Ng
Like, oh mon Dieu! Moliere's 17th century comedy "Tartuffe" gets airlifted to a wealthy enclave of the San Fernando Valley in a new theatrical production that's, like, so totally amazing. This postmodern retelling at the Theatre @ Boston Court in Pasadena is intended to be divisive to the max, but risk-seeking audiences will be glad they donned their designer thinking caps for this highly original deconstruction of the classic French play. Set in a tacky suburban mansion, "Tartuffe" follows the plight of Orgon (Tim Cummings)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
"There aren't that many acting couples around anymore," Ron Leibman was explaining. "The Tandy-Cronyns (Jessica and Hume) are getting older, Paul and Joanne (Newman and Woodward) work together occasionally, Eli and Annie (Wallach and Jackson) try to work together--but that's about it. So this has opened up a whole new thing for us." "This" is Leibman's teaming with his wife, actress Jessica Walter, in the Los Angeles Theatre Center's staging of Moliere's dark comedy "Tartuffe," opening Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005
In the feature on stage director Andre Gregory ["Repast Is Prologue," March 20], Gregory made reference to a 1967 production of "Tartuffe," staged while he was at the helm of the Inner City Cultural Center. He said, "It managed to offend just about everybody.... The kids loved it." Guess what? I was one of the kids who saw that production. It was the first play I'd ever seen. The opportunity arose as a result of a social experiment in which Franklin High School, and other L.A. city high schools, participated.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1992
As artistic director of Dancing Dog Theatre Company, I was dismayed to learn, upon reading "The Merchants of Glendale" (June 21), that we do not exist. Jan Breslauer writes: "The only major producing group devoted exclusively to classics besides A Noise Within is Shakespeare Festival/LA." What are we, chopped liver? DDTC was formed in 1987 and has since mounted major productions of "Macbeth," "Cyrano de Bergerac," "Twelfth Night," "Tartuffe," Cocteau's "The Infernal Machine" and, most recently, "Wild Honey."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2007 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
A tiptop theatrical production of "Tartuffe," "The Misanthrope" or another great Molière comedy offers audiences a banquet of hypocrites, poseurs and passionate, often obsessed characters whom Cupid -- or social ambition -- has rendered nearly insane enough to forget their rhymed couplets. A film portrait of the French dramatist, therefore, requires at least some of the fire and ice you'd find in an ideal Molière staging. And "some" is what you get here.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1994
Sorry to grouse, but the Jan. 9 Sunday Calendar was a real drag with stories featuring those world-class malcontents Larry Kramer and Bill Bushnell. Now, it's my turn to kvetch. Kramer vilifies "Philadelphia" because it isn't the film he wants it to be. You're a writer, Lar, write your own damn AIDS movie! And crybaby Billy blames everyone but himself for the failure of the Los Angeles Theatre Center. He's bitter because he and The Times' critics couldn't get L.A. theatergoers to succumb to his cesspool school of drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2007 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
A tiptop theatrical production of "Tartuffe," "The Misanthrope" or another great Molière comedy offers audiences a banquet of hypocrites, poseurs and passionate, often obsessed characters whom Cupid -- or social ambition -- has rendered nearly insane enough to forget their rhymed couplets. A film portrait of the French dramatist, therefore, requires at least some of the fire and ice you'd find in an ideal Molière staging. And "some" is what you get here.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005
In the feature on stage director Andre Gregory ["Repast Is Prologue," March 20], Gregory made reference to a 1967 production of "Tartuffe," staged while he was at the helm of the Inner City Cultural Center. He said, "It managed to offend just about everybody.... The kids loved it." Guess what? I was one of the kids who saw that production. It was the first play I'd ever seen. The opportunity arose as a result of a social experiment in which Franklin High School, and other L.A. city high schools, participated.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | David C. Nichols, F. Kathleen Foley, Daryl H. Miller
Unsettling timeliness underwrites the tomfoolery of "Tartuffe," now at the Odyssey Theatre. Moliere's deathless satire of religious hypocrisy feels most prescient at present. Moliere first presented his unfinished "Tartuffe" to Louis XIV's court in 1664. Religious factions cried blasphemy, and "Tartuffe" was banned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Clad in '50s chic, a black bourgeois family saunters onto the stage to the strains of Sinatra's rendition of "I've Got You Under My Skin." So begins Charles Randolph-Wright's effervescently stylish staging of Moliere's "Tartuffe," at American Conservatory Theater. The man who's under this family's skin is none other than the sanctimonious charlatan Tartuffe. Created in 1664, he's still stalking his prey nearly four centuries later, among the affluent African Americans of Durham, N.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
As long as hypocrisy thrives, so will Moliere's "Tartuffe." Every age yields incorrigible rascals who profess piety. Still, the current drama in Washington makes this great comedy from 1664 seem especially apt. The audiences attending the staging by David Chambers at South Coast Repertory don't need the resonances spelled out.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI
Something is terribly amiss in Hudson Guild Theatre's production of Moliere's "Tartuffe." The characters are in various shades of white face--from the almost normal pallor of Madame Pernelle (Mae Marmy) to the clownishly slathered thickness of Cleante (Daniel Nathan Spector). They mug, screw up their eyeballs and race around the stage as if escapees from a silent-era film, yet shout most of the dialogue at full volume.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
In another month, the new Los Angeles Theatre Center begins its 1986-87 season--perhaps its most financially critical one. Only Monday, the Community Redevelopment Agency Commission, which has pumped about $10 million into the theater, announced that it has hired William Severns to serve as its arts consultant with LATC. Severns, a top arts administrator who was head of the Music Center Operating Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A holy man revealed as a slavering sexaholic, a prominent family shamed and a business empire in danger of being taken over. This could be the story leading the 5 o'clock news, but it's the 328-year-old tale told in Moliere's satiric masterpiece, "Tartuffe." To ensure no one misses the parallels to today, those mischief-makers over at Stages have updated Moliere's story to present-day Orange County, behind the scenes at a religious-broadcasting empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the moment, Shakespeare Orange County is Moliere Orange County, and the change is a little startling. Under Thomas F. Bradac's direction, the Shakespeare done at Shakespeare Orange County is usually competent but seldom memorable. But give Bradac Moliere's "Tartuffe," and you have a whole different animal. Indeed, "animal" is the operative word for Ron Campbell's performance as theater's slimiest hypocrite.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|