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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2010 | By Josh Gajewski, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every time Luis Moncada blinks, he curses, thanks to the unprintable expletive tattooed onto his eyelids at age 18. A gang member at the time, he was convinced he wouldn't make it to 21 and wanted to deliver this angry message to the world when he was gone. Fourteen years later, Moncada is telling a different kind of story with his eyes. He and his brother Daniel have recurring roles on AMC's "Breaking Bad," where they've spent much of this third season playing silent-assassin types — cartel members from Mexico who've come to kill Walter White ( Bryan Cranston)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
After seven years of guarding inmates in Los Angeles County jails, Deputy Guadalupe Lopez was transferred to the East L.A. Station to continue her career working in patrol. It was there, she says in a lawsuit filed this week, that she encountered a rogue group of deputies called the “Banditos.” The Banditos, she alleges, sport matching tattoos and try to coerce female deputy patrol trainees like her into performing sexual favors. In a 19-page lawsuit, Lopez contends that she was assigned a training officer who was known as the “Godfather” and was a leader of the group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Jonny Lee Miller, star of the hit CBS television series "Elementary," joined us for a video chat in which he talked about playing a contemporary version of legendary detective Sherlock Holmes opposite Lucy Liu's Watson. Miller touched on the challenges of playing such a well-known and beloved character and answered questions from readers, offering tips on memorization and telling of his relief that he wouldn't have to worry about covering up his tattoos for the role. Reviewing the series when it premiered in the fall, Times television critic Mary McNamara praised "Elementary" for delivering "characters at once solidly modern and true to the canon" created by Arthur Conan Doyle.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Rex Ryan and Mark Sanchez will be forever linked. In our memories, anyway. The New York Jets finally parted ways with their embattled former starting quarterback this month, and now the team's coach is talking about altering the tattoo on his arm that currently features a woman wearing Sanchez's No. 6 jersey. Surely, that design seemed like a great idea at the time. Well, maybe not. But it's even sillier now. A reporter asked Ryan about the ink Tuesday, and the coach seemed to decide its fate right there on the spot.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
Even the most diligent parent can lose a kid now and then - mostly now. A new product may help take some of the angst and desperation out of such an event. SafetyTats are temporary tattoos that read “If Lost, Please Call” and list a parent or guardian's cell number. They were invented by a mom named Michele Welsh, who as a precaution would write her cell number on her children's arms in crowded public venues, like theme parks.  She explained to her three active boys to stay with Mommy and Daddy, but they were told that if they did get separated, they could show the numbers to an adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore, Special to the Los Angeles Times
GIFU, Japan - Hidden away in the backroom of a modest apartment in this central Japanese city, one of Japan's last remaining hand-tattoo masters is preparing his tools. Over the last four decades Oguri Kazuo has tattooed notable geisha and countless yakuza , members of Japan's notorious mafia. Today, the 79-year-old artist, known professionally as Horihide (derived from " hori ," meaning "to carve"), is working on a client who is a little more subdued. Motoyama Tetsuro has spent hundreds of dollars, traveled thousands of miles and waited more than three decades for a session with Horihide.
HEALTH
June 1, 2013
Who hasn't seen a lost child, with tear-stained cheeks, wandering at an amusement park or airport? Parents might feel less anxious with a product called Safetytat ( www.safetytat.com ), a temporary, stick-on tattoo on which you can write a phone number. They come six to a pack, with a marker (about $10). Or they are sold customized, with warnings about allergies or other information (about $20 for 24). The package suggests that caregivers write a cellphone number on the tattoo and don't include the child's name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999
I read "The Secret Society Among Lawmen" (March 24) with interest. I am a law enforcement supervisor with 23 years on the job and still working "the street." I think I am probably more in touch with young line officers than the senior management quoted. In your article tattoos are given a sinister meaning that is out of touch with today's realities. Using the presence of tattooing by young deputies as evidence of secret societies without more explanation about tattoos is unfair. I supervise young police officers and notice that many of them, as well as many young adults, have tattoos.
MAGAZINE
September 11, 2005
In his column on tattoos, Dan Neil stated, "I worry the tattoo craze is part of something bigger, a sort of fatalism that keeps people from imagining the future because, somehow, they expect not to see it" ("Britney Forever," 800 Words, Aug. 14). This opinion would be more appropriate in relation to reality television and Social Security, not the desire to possess an eternal work of art. The bigger picture will never be overshadowed by even the largest tattoo. Christopher Rodriguez South Pasadena
FOOD
April 27, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Michael Voltaggio has no idea how many tattoos he has. The question makes him laugh. The wise-cracking 33-year-old chef is pretty well covered. The name of his restaurant, after all, is Ink. Before dinner service on a recent Friday, Voltaggio plays around with an insulated bucket of liquid nitrogen, dipping his hand in it and tossing the residue on the floor where it morphs, CGI-like, into little rolling marbles of chemistry before dissolving into wisps...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting is apparently counting on a marriage that will last a lifetime, committing to a tattoo commemorating the day she became Mrs. Ryan Sweeting. The actress and the tennis player got engaged only three months after meeting, and were married about three months after that in a New Year's Eve ceremony. It's that Dec. 31, 2013, date that's commemorated in Roman numerals tattooed between her shoulder blades. Cuoco-Sweeting, 28, gave the world a peek Saturday night in an exhibition tennis match that saw them wearing coordinating hot-pink-and-black tennis gear.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Melissa Rohlin
The Kentucky men's basketball team is not predicted to win the 2014 National Championship, but super fan Tyler Austin Black doesn't believe the odds. In fact, the 22-year-old machinist is so confident that his team will win that he got a tattoo on his right calf that says "Nati9nal Champions," the nine standing for Kentucky's ninth title.  "I'm not delusional," Black told reporters, according to ESPN. "I know we've had a rough season. Big Blue Nation is down and the majority of people have no faith in us. But we have faith in ourselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Victoria Kim
The search continued Friday for a Los Angeles parolee with mental health problems suspected of kidnapping his two children. Charles Baines, 36, has a shaved head and the words “Drug Cartel” tattooed on his left cheek and is believed to be in Mexico with his two sons, who are 9 and 10 years old. Baines is accused of taking the boys from his mother's Harbor City home Wednesday night. He whisked the boys away in his father's car while his mom slept, authorities said. Baines' mother and father have custody of his children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2013 | By Victoria Kim
Authorities are seeking the public's help to locate a parolee with mental health problems suspected of kidnapping his two children Wednesday night. Charles Baines, 36, has a shaved head and the words “Drug Cartel” tattooed on his left cheek, according to the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department. Baines allegedly took his two sons, who are 9 and 10 years old, from the Harbor City home of his mother, who has custody of the children, according to authorities. Baines is driving a red Kia Spectra with the license plate 6FMN288, which was stolen from his mother, who was asleep when he left with the children, according to the Sheriff's Department.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Developing wearable tech devices is all the rage these days. Think Google Glass eyewear, Samsung's smartwatch. Now comes an idea that may beat them all. Motorola, the Google-owned phone maker, has applied for a patent for a technology that would allow users to have microphones embedded in their throats. The mic tattoos would connect with users' mobile devices wirelessly, and, by being positioned close to a user's larynx, could pick up clearer audio than the regular microphones that we use today, Motorola says.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Sephora has pulled a un-PC shade of lipstick from its shelves -- and it wasn't the color that was controversial. The cosmetics giant this week removed "Celebutard," a pinky-beige hue from the Kat Von D lipstick line, following complaints from disability advocates and upset consumers. The name, which refers to vapid celebrities (often of the reality TV star variety), also references "retard. " "People with disabilities are the last to benefit from what some might call 'political correctness,' and what I would call basic human decency," Kim Stagliano, managing editor of Age of Autism, wrote in a Huffington Post blog.
NEWS
July 17, 2003 | Susan Carpenter
They used to be the mark of societal outcasts, but tattoos today are anything but. What was once a rite of passage for servicemen and convicts is now a status symbol for housewives and businessmen. Capitalizing on the mainstream rep: the First Annual Tattoo and Body Art Expo at the Pomona Fairplex.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Netflix has a genuine fan boy in Myron Robinson, the first person we know of to make that fervor a permanent addition to his body. Robinson, a college student and aspiring fashion designer from Indiana, says he admired the company and its founder Reed Hastings so much, he tattooed "Netflix" on his stomach. (For all you skeptics out there, he swears it's "definitely real. ") Robinson couldn't keep the tattoo under wraps (or under his shirt) for long. He tweeted his tattoo to Netflix,  which gave him a shout out and a subscription . Even Hastings took notice on his Facebook page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By James Barragan
The fate of the co-founder of frozen yogurt giant Pinkberry depends on the answer to one question: Who had the tire iron? Young Lee, 48, is accused of assault with a deadly weapon for allegedly beating Donald Bolding with a tire iron in June 2011 while Bolding was panhandling on the side of an east Hollywood street. After becoming upset that Bolding flashed a tattoo to people in Lee's car - including his fiancee - showing a stick-figure couple having sex, Lee drove away - but he returned with another man and beat Bolding, prosecutors say. During closing arguments Wednesday, the defense attorney and prosecutor alike said the outcome of the case depended on whether the jury believed Lee was the one who wielded the tire iron.
SPORTS
July 8, 2013 | By Stephen Bailey
The tattoo under Angels pitcher Michael Kohn's left wrist is only a year old, but it represents perseverance he has displayed much longer. It reads "never. " "Never back down, never give in," Kohn said. Not after surgery he underwent in high school to remove bone spurs in his throwing elbow scared off major-college recruiters. Not after his career as a first baseman fizzled. Not after Tommy John surgery in April 2012 stalled his budding major league career. "It's always been my philosophy," he said of the tattoo.
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