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Tax Holiday

NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey
House Speaker John Boehner said Monday that he expects the House to vote down the payroll tax deal brokered by Senate Republicans and Democrats, and push for further negotiations in the year-end battle over extending the tax holiday. At a brief morning news conference, Boehner aimed to put fresh pressure on the Senate, which adjourned for the holidays after passing the deal on Saturday, to come back to the table. "This is a vote on whether Congress will stay and do its work or go on vacation," Boehner said.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
In the first legislative battle of the year, congressional Republicans and Democrats are back at it: another episode of one-upmanship over extending a payroll tax cut for American workers. The tax holiday, which Congress extended as 2011 closed, expires at the end of the month, and both parties say they want to avoid a lapse that would hit Americans with a tax increase of $20 a week for the typical worker. But the problem remains the same: how to pay for the $160-billion package?
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
With most lawmakers gone for the holidays, President Obama took full advantage of the empty stage, appearing with everyday Americans to make the case that House Republicans need to relent and pass a payroll tax cut extension that would mean an extra $1,000 a year to a typical family. Obama struck a note of disgust Thursday with the paralysis in the Capitol, making the point that only a small minority of House Republicans is blocking a tax cut extension that would help struggling families heat their homes, fuel their cars and pay for essential groceries.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Whatever the ultimate shape of the "fiscal cliff" solution that has preoccupied all Washington, and a fair swath of the rest of country, in the final days of 2012 and into the new year, Americans of all walks of life should be asking themselves this question: How do we like being conned? The deal, passed by the Senate on New Year's morning, was made final late Tuesday when the House of Representatives signed on. Its essential elements include expiration of the President George W. Bush-era income and capital gains tax cuts on couples' incomes over $450,000, and a modest increase in the estate tax. Unemployment benefits and tax credits for lower-income families will be extended.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
If you're a business traveler who books hotel rooms via the Internet, you may be at higher risk of being victimized by computer hackers and identity thieves. Insurance claims for data theft worldwide jumped 56% last year, with a bigger number of those attacks targeting the hospitality industry, according to a new report by Willis Group Holdings, a British insurance firm. The report said the largest share of cyber attacks — 38% — were aimed at hotels, resorts and tour companies.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Even as he prepares to run for the Senate in Arizona next year, Rep. Jeff Flake is taking an unusual position, especially for a Republican in an election year: He opposes an effort in Congress to save his constituents $1,000 or more in Social Security payroll taxes. Flake argues that voters will be on his side when he makes his case that the country cannot afford to keep such a tax break for 160 million Americans. "What the public understands is the Congress has been unwilling to make any tough decisions — we've had our cake and eaten it too for so long.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2010 | By Don Lee, Peter Nicholas and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Pressure on President Obama to do something about the weakening economy intensified Friday with new government data showing that hiring remains lackluster, nudging the nation's unemployment rate up to 9.6%. With congressional elections less than eight weeks away, Obama appeared in the Rose Garden to say that he would soon propose a new package of tax cuts and other incentives to spur employment. "We are confident that we are moving in the right direction, but we want to keep this recovery moving stronger and accelerate the job growth that's needed so desperately," the president said.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Apple Inc.'s success at avoiding billions of dollars in U.S. taxes through some (apparently) legal maneuvers has tax pundits pointing their guns at the corporate tax system. The case has revived numerous hoary cures for the supposed evil of corporate taxes. The cures include abolishing the corporate tax altogether, turning it into a pure "territorial" system that taxes multinational firms only in proportion to the income generated within the United States, declaring a tax "holiday" allowing businesses to repatriate cash parked overseas (where it is taxed at vanishingly small rates, like Apple's)
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
Hesitant to be seen as holding up a payroll tax break for American workers, House GOP leaders will put forward a new proposal to extend the tax cut, giving up for now on the GOP-led requirement that it must be paid for,  as talks on a compromise with Democrats have stalled. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and other leaders said their backup plan could come for a vote as soon as this week, as Congress struggles to find common ground before the tax break expires Feb. 29. Keeping the tax holiday is President Obama's top legislative priority.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
A common complaint about President Obama is that he spent more time campaigning than governing. But as he told a Univision forum in September, he sees little difference between the two, considering the obstruction posed by Republicans on Capitol Hill. He planned a "much more constant conversation with the American people" in his second term, "so they can put pressure on Congress to help move some of these [important] issues forward. " Obama wasted no time in putting this strategy into effect, opening a "conversation" with the public about the looming fiscal disaster that could slam the brakes on the economy.
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