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Tax Incentives

OPINION
December 29, 2002 | Bruce Bartlett, Bruce Bartlett is a senior fellow with the National Center for Policy Analysis in Washington.
According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, which is the final word on such things, a recession began in July 1990 and ended in March 1991. Yet, during the 1992 presidential campaign -- long after the recession was officially over -- Bill Clinton convinced voters that the economy was still ailing and that President Bush was responsible. Clinton's ability to successfully make that case was the single biggest factor in his victory. The memory of those times guarantees that the U.S.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2002 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Monica start-up that proposes to build cars on demand for individual consumers, much as Dell Computer Corp. operates, said Tuesday that it has been offered a $53-million package of private and government incentives to build an auto assembly plant in San Bernardino. No decision has been made on the offer, but William S. Li, a former Ford Motor Co. executive and co-founder of Build-To-Order Inc.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Millions of Californians won't be able to take full advantage of new federal tax incentives to save for retirement and their children's education unless state lawmakers change the state's tax code. Several state legislators plan this week to propose bills to resolve the issue. But the legislation would cost millions in tax revenue and would come as California's budget is already under strain, making passage less than a sure thing.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2001 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film and TV workers told state lawmakers Wednesday that they must pass meaningful tax incentives and cut bureaucratic red tape if California is to thwart competition from Canada and other low-cost countries that are siphoning off production. But while sympathizing with their plight, state officials repeatedly warned that the climate in Sacramento for Hollywood tax breaks increasingly is cloudy because of the state's worsening financial picture.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Canadian government is poised to eliminate a lucrative financial incentive that has helped build the country's burgeoning film industry while benefiting U.S. entertainment companies. Canada's finance minister announced plans last month to abolish a tax shelter that Hollywood studios and independent producers have utilized to shave millions of dollars from the cost of making movies. Producers say tax-shelter financing can save as much as 6% of production costs.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to stem the loss of U.S. film-related jobs to cheaper foreign locales--a chief concern among Hollywood's rank and file--a bipartisan group of senators plans to introduce legislation as soon as today that would give a tax break to companies that keep production at home. That such legislation is even contemplated suggests the extent of the inroads made by other countries into an industry that was once dominated by Americans from start to finish.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday called for a "new kind of conservation" that saves power through tax incentives and energy-efficient technology, signaling a shift in tone as he prepares to unveil his long-range energy policy. Bush's focus on conservation in his weekly radio address follows criticism that he and Vice President Dick Cheney have been drafting a plan that is heavily weighted toward more oil and gas drilling while giving short shrift to other approaches to the energy problem.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Key senators on Tuesday put the brakes on President Bush's effort to channel more government money to religious charities, giving the White House time to fine-tune its proposal before the Senate acts on the more controversial parts of the package. The decision to wait several months to a year to act on the "charitable choice" component of the package, which would allow government to fund religious-oriented social services, was made with the White House's agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001
Re "Three Things We Need on Taxes: Simplify, Simplify, Simplify," by Maya MacGuineas, Opinion, Feb. 11: How confused can we get? It seems to me there is a peculiar smell of the failed supply-side economic theory of the Reagan administration. How does one reconcile powerful incentives to save with the lesser ability to consume, i.e., to stimulate the dangerous slowing of the economy, under MacGuineas' proposed progressive consumption tax? In addition: If a person saves too much too soon he or she may find that, at retirement, income may be the same or even more with fewer tax deductions, and therefore the person will be in a higher bracket.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawing parallels between runaway production in entertainment and the demise of the steel industry, Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-Los Angeles) told a San Fernando Valley economic group Tuesday that lawmakers need to combat the $10-billion problem with revisions in the U.S. tax code. Though short on specifics, Becerra urged members of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.
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