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NEWS
December 5, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
The two pulp mills on Humboldt Bay may be old, ugly and smell bad, but they provide hundreds of jobs in a rural, job-starved economy. Those nose-wrinkling odors fuming from the tall smokestacks are "the smell of money," according to the mills' defenders. And any threat to the mills stirs a lot of anxiety here on California's rugged northern coast. When local environmentalists attacked the sulfurous fumes, the controversy quickly polarized the communities around the storm-swept bay.
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NEWS
December 5, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
The two pulp mills on Humboldt Bay may be old, ugly and smell bad, but they provide hundreds of jobs in a rural, job-starved economy. Those nose-wrinkling odors fuming from the tall smokestacks are "the smell of money," according to the mills' defenders. And any threat to the mills stirs a lot of anxiety here on California's rugged northern coast. When local environmentalists attacked the sulfurous fumes, the controversy quickly polarized the communities around the storm-swept bay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports and
Trace elements of dioxin have been detected in shellfish, crabs and bottomfish near a pulp mill on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canadian Fisheries Minister Tom Siddon said. The fish were taken by department officials near MacMillan Bloedel's pulp mill at Harmac south of Nanaimo, British Columbia, he said. The samples of crabs, clams, oysters and sole showed traces of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, among the most toxic synthetic substances known.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony, which introduced digital audio tape decks to the United States, has just put out the first miniature portable in this country: the DAT Walkman recorder. The Sony TCD-D3 ($850) is being hailed by electronics experts as a technological marvel and is focusing renewed attention on DAT that could help speed up a settlement of the class-action lawsuit filed against the Sony system.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Dioxin, a potent cause of cancer in laboratory animals, is found in tiny amounts in many paper products--such as coffee filters, napkins and tampons--bleached with chlorine, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday. But the agency said it believes there is no health hazard from using those products. John T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001
"Industries Fight EPA Study Linking Dioxin to Cancer" (April 12) highlights the Bush administration's new attitude toward public health. The report, compiled at the behest of the chemical industry, attempts to quantify dangers associated with dioxin. But when evidence mounted that extremely low doses of dioxin have been known to cause cancer and reproductive and developmental effects in animals, industry became displeased. In fact, one form of dioxin, TCDD, was found to be among the world's most potent toxins.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Vietnamese and U.S. officials have agreed for the first time to work together to study the possible effects on humans and the environment of Agent Orange, a powerful chemical defoliant used by the American military during the Vietnam War, the U.S. Embassy said Tuesday. American and Vietnamese scientists agreed to set up a pilot study to screen soil and sediment for dioxin, a toxic component of Agent Orange, at a meeting this week in Hanoi. They also agreed to hold the first Vietnamese-U.S.
WORLD
December 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
New tests reveal that Ukrainian presidential candidate Viktor Yushchenko's blood contains the second-highest level of dioxin poisoning ever recorded in a human -- more than 6,000 times the normal concentration, the expert analyzing the samples said. Abraham Brouwer, professor of environmental toxicology at the Free University in Amsterdam, where the blood samples were sent for analysis, said they contained about 100,000 units of dioxin per gram of blood fat.
TRAVEL
June 20, 2010 | By Peter Kupfer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It seemed like a brilliant idea at the time: touring Turkey by train. Turkey was at the top of my list of countries I had yet to conquer, and trains have long been my favorite mode of transportation. Conjuring images of the old Orient Express, I envisioned lounging under a silk-shaded sconce in my plushly upholstered, wood-paneled compartment as the Mediterranean coast glided past my window. There were, it turns out, a couple of problems with that picture. Turkish passenger trains didn't travel along the Mediterranean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1988 | ELLEN K. SILBERGELD, Ellen K. Silbergeld, a toxicologist, is chair of the Environmental Defense Fund's toxic chemicals program, and a member of the EPA's Science Advisory Board
The Environmental Protection Agency, facing a closetful of required but unfinished homework on the risk of toxic chemicals and confronted with a lawsuit that challenges its failure to protect the public, suddenly has discovered new ways to recalculate a major chemical hazard. Conveniently, these novel approaches to the evaluation of health risk just happen to change the numbers enough so that the EPA feels justified in not taking the protective actions that would otherwise be required by law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1990 | WILLIAM C. CRUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Columbia River drains a Texas-sized corner of northwestern North America, its historically pristine waters rushing to the Pacific Ocean. Seemingly spared the industrial pollution threatening other great rivers, the Columbia is the heart of a vast and fertile land. Majestic bald eagles nest along its lower reaches. Salmon fight their way upstream in an annual ritual of renewal. But all may not be well on the river.
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