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Tea Bags

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NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You can never be too rich or too thin, perhaps, but you certainly can drink too much tea.  That's the bottom line of an unusual case report published in this week's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.  Doctors at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit treated a 47-year-old woman who had suffered from pain in her lower back, hips, legs and arms. She was also missing all of her teeth because they had become brittle.  Something was wrong with her bones. Sure enough, X-rays revealed that the vertebrae in her spine showed signs of a painful condition called skeletal fluorosis.   Doctors gave her a blood test to measure the concentration of flouride in her system.
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TRAVEL
March 30, 2013
For a child who may experience discomfort on takeoff or landing in air travel, take along a small plastic bag of Cheerios, trail mix, raisins, and or small nuts or candies (depending on allergies, age of the child and health issues, of course). Feed them one at a time to your child. This tricks them into swallowing frequently, which clears their ears. It works like magic and they don't arrive cranky and scared of air travel. Harry and Jean Pope Long Beach Besides carrying a flashlight (keep it on the nightstand)
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NEWS
July 12, 1987 | JUDITH MATLOFF, Reuters
Britain has adopted the American hamburger, Indian curries, the Greek kebab and all types of Chinese cuisine. But thanks mainly to a soggy fold of paper, it shows no sign of replacing its beloved tea. Tea drinking, as entrenched in the nation's history as its former empire, might have succumbed to market rival coffee, industry experts say. But the easy and cheap tea bag has fought off that challenge to ensure that the leafy brew remains Britain's No. 1 drink.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
You can never be too rich or too thin, perhaps, but you certainly can drink too much tea.  That's the bottom line of an unusual case report published in this week's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.  Doctors at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit treated a 47-year-old woman who had suffered from pain in her lower back, hips, legs and arms. She was also missing all of her teeth because they had become brittle.  Something was wrong with her bones. Sure enough, X-rays revealed that the vertebrae in her spine showed signs of a painful condition called skeletal fluorosis.   Doctors gave her a blood test to measure the concentration of flouride in her system.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Almost before Congress noticed, several dozen radio talk-show hosts--armed with fax machines and studio microphones--tapped into their listeners' fury earlier this month and created a potent new nationwide lobbying network. The radio hosts in cities ranging from Boston to Detroit to Los Angeles say they hope the loose confederation they formed will be as politically formidable in its own way as such established lobbying groups as Common Cause and the National Rifle Assn.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | THOMAS WAGNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Those who grow Darjeeling tea have long believed that putting it into tea bags would be like selling champagne in plastic bottles. But the tea bags may be about to happen, what with the worldwide recession, the collapse of the Soviet market, devastating hailstorms, ethnic violence and venerable tea bushes that appear to be dying.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a mile above the Indian Ocean, where the mountainsides are covered by a soft green blanket of the bushes known as camellia sinensis , a revolution is brewing, stirred by consumers in far-off markets. Changing tastes and technology are shaking Sri Lanka's century-old tea industry, a business that provides work for more than a million Sri Lankans, more than any other economic sector on this ethnically and politically troubled island.
FOOD
March 15, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
Add a little humor to the lives of your tea lovin' friends with Bag Ladies tea bags. The tea bags come in five themes: Girlfriends, Working Girls, Forget Him, I Do, I Think (for the bride-to-be) and Oh, Baby! (for the new mom). Each tea bag of English breakfast tea is tagged with a humorous quote. Bag Ladies tea bags, 2-ounce can of 20 tea bags, $15 from Lifestylz, 143 N. Larchmont Blvd., Los Angeles. (323) 871-8963 or order on the Internet at http://www.bagladiestea.com.
FOOD
December 28, 1986
Apple juice, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg are blended with freshly brewed tea and crab apple syrup in this variation of the traditional holiday wassail. For your New Year's Eve or New Year's Day party ladle the piping-hot punch into mugs and garnish with spiced apples and whole cinnamon sticks. Blend in brandy for a spirited version. Serve with an assortment of cheese and crackers to visiting friends or before a holiday dinner.
FOOD
June 5, 1986
Parties are a nice way to put graduates in the limelight and give friends and relatives an opportunity to congratulate them on their accomplishments. There are many types of parties--from formal to informal--but a flavorful punch and something sweet will be great additions to almost any menu. Cherry Cordial is a crisp, fruit punch that blends cherry almond tea, ginger ale, frozen lemonade concentrate and cranberry juice cocktail.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Pack a batch of cookbook author Paula Wolfert's prunes in Armagnac into a Mason jar. (Awesome over vanilla ice cream or crepes.) They'll be ready to eat in two weeks: You can include that on the "don't-open-until-Christmas" card. RECIPES: 25 homemade holiday gift ideas! Prunes soaked in sweetened and lightly-spiced Armagnac is just one way to get crafty this holiday season with homemade gifts from the kitchen. We've compiled 25 great ideas, ranging from quick and simple gifts (perfect if you're working with kids)
FOOD
January 26, 2012
There are several types of katsuobushi that can be used for different purposes. The best will have light pink or beige shavings that will be slightly shiny. Once the packages are opened, the katsuobushi will begin to oxidize and go limp, and the color becomes dull. Katsuobushi is best stored in the freezer. Hanakatsuo is thin petals that resemble large wood shavings. Some contain chiai (dark meat). Shaved karebushi makes a flavorful stock full of aroma.
FOOD
September 1, 2011
Green tea granita Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: 4 to 6 1 quart water Juice of 1 lemon 1/2 cup sugar 4 tea bags of unsweetened and unflavored green tea 2 sprigs mint, crushed 1/2 teaspoon crushed pink peppercorns, optional 1. In a medium saucepan, combine the water, lemon juice and sugar. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove from heat. 2. Add the tea bags and mint to the pan and steep the tea for 3 minutes. 3. After 5 minutes, strain the mixture into a large baking dish.
FOOD
May 18, 2005 | Betty Baboujon
Tea triangles These infusers are miniature temples to the art of drinking tea. In each silken pyramid, whole tea leaves unfurl, or flowers and herbs darken as they steep. The effect is as pleasing to the eye as the tea is to the palate. And with its jaunty leaf handle and flat base, each bag invites repeat infusions. Just lift and set aside. It'll sit pretty till you're ready for another cup. Pyramid tea bags.
TRAVEL
January 23, 2005 | Judi Dash
I was picnicking on an East Coast mountaintop awhile back when a passing hiker joked, "Avez-vous Grey Poupon?" To my questioner's surprise, I pulled two packets of the stuff out of my knapsack. No big deal. Spicy mustard packets are among two dozen or so items I always take on my travels. Whether for convenience, safety or simply self-indulgence, my favorite pack-alongs give me a prepared-for-anything feeling.
MAGAZINE
October 31, 2004 | Hillary Johnson, Hillary Johnson last wrote for the magazine about shopping.
I've always hated those women's magazine articles that focus on some minuscule aspect of one's personal care--healthy cuticles, say, or glossy eyelashes--and blithely prescribe impossible regimens such as "drink eight glasses of water a day, avoid sun, red meat, dairy products, caffeine, cigarettes, stress and alcohol, give one-third of your income to charity and get plenty of sleep." Well all right!
FOOD
September 22, 1988
When you're hosting a birthday brunch you'll want to prepare as many menu items in advance as possible: It's the key to successful entertaining. These cool, make-ahead citrus-tea based refreshers, attractively served, are sure to please the crowd. Tea, lemon juice and your favorite berries blend beautifully in Lemon-Berry Tea Punch and Blueberry and Lemon Cold Brew Ice Tea.
FOOD
September 1, 2011
Green tea granita Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time Servings: 4 to 6 1 quart water Juice of 1 lemon 1/2 cup sugar 4 tea bags of unsweetened and unflavored green tea 2 sprigs mint, crushed 1/2 teaspoon crushed pink peppercorns, optional 1. In a medium saucepan, combine the water, lemon juice and sugar. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove from heat. 2. Add the tea bags and mint to the pan and steep the tea for 3 minutes. 3. After 5 minutes, strain the mixture into a large baking dish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Helen Gustafson, an expert on tea who wrote several books on the subject and who developed a tea service for Chez Panisse that became a signature for the trend-setting Berkeley restaurant, has died. She was 74. Gustafson died at home in Berkeley on Dec. 14 after a six- year battle with cancer, according to her husband, Clair. A champion of fine teas properly prepared, Gustafson taught and wrote about her subject with passion. During nearly 20 years at Chez Panisse, she attended to a selection of organically grown teas and set meticulous guidelines on how to prepare a brew, which she expected the staff to follow.
FOOD
November 1, 2000 | LAURA CALDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In my family, we were tea drinkers, an admission that sounds almost quaint these days, given the coffee craze that has swept the continent over the past few decades. Somehow, my family slipped through that grip of mass social conversion and kept right on drinking tea as if coffee had never been invented. As a result, I grew up rather archaically knowing what a proper cup of tea tastes like, and I was brought up to be fussy about it, as only a tea drinker can be.
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