Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTea Party
IN THE NEWS

Tea Party

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON -- Liberals were dancing on what they saw as the tea party's grave after Jim DeMint, one of its champions, decided to quit the Senate and take the Heritage Foundation's top job. But although 2012 has been, at best, a mixed bag for the tea party, the movement isn't dead. The first test of its vitality comes as Washington tries to deal with the nation's short- and long-term budget and debt crises, issues that top the tea-party agenda. Anti-tax hardliner Grover Norquist predicts a tea-party revival if the U.S. goes over the so-called fiscal cliff this month, which would happen if President Obama and Congress can't reach agreement by Dec. 31 on how to avert the mandated tax increases and across-the-board spending cuts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro
PEARL, Miss. - Sen. Thad Cochran is a portrait of the genteel Southern politician, known for three-piece suits, a shock of white hair and shoveling billions of government dollars back to his impoverished home state to repair levees, construct research facilities at Ole Miss and bolster catfish farms. That spending prowess once reaped rewards for the Mississippi senator, with buildings bearing his name, easy reelection campaigns and so much public affection that he's known here simply as "Thad.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Tea partiers are fed up with the status quo and demand change. So they elect people like Texas GOP Senate nominee Ted Cruz, who by emphasizing his own unwillingness to compromise ensures that nothing will change and that Congress will remain at least as paralyzed and powerless as it already is for the foreseeable future. Great move, Liptonites. The come-from-behind victory by Cruz in a Republican runoff election Tuesday against Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst is being widely hailed as another sign not only of the tea party's political might, but its disdain for establishment Republicans.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Republican incumbents threatened by tea party challengers emerged triumphant in Tuesday's Texas primary, with longtime U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions coasting to victory. The primary also marked the electoral debut of the fourth generation of the Bush dynasty with George P. Bush's candidacy. The son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, nephew and grandson of the former presidents and great-grandson of a U.S. senator, the 37-year-old won the Republican nomination for Texas land commissioner, a little-known but powerful post that has served as a launching pad for state politics.
OPINION
April 20, 2011
The winning electoral coalition assembled by Ronald Reagan in the 1980s has been compared to a three-legged stool, the legs being social conservatives, fiscal conservatives and national security conservatives. As the 2012 Republican race takes shape, another leg has been added to the stool — the "tea party" movement. Last week, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney announced that he was setting up an exploratory committee (though it's hardly a secret what he'll discover), as did former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.
OPINION
April 17, 2010 | Tim Rutten
One of the things journalism teaches you over and over again is that nothing ruins a good story quite like the facts. Consider, for example, this week's renewal of the chattering classes' infatuation with the "tea party" movement, timed to coincide with the deadline to file federal income tax returns. The group is conventionally portrayed as a burgeoning populist expression of discontent that sprouted spontaneously from the grass-roots and cuts in new ways across sectional, class and gender lines.
OPINION
May 22, 2010 | Tim Rutten
Ever since he resigned his speakership and House seat in disgrace nearly 12 years ago, Newt Gingrich has prowled the margins of electoral politics like a wolf, hungry and opportunistic. He's tried on a variety of ideas and ideological colorations in those intervening years, but this week, with the publication of his new book, "To Save America: Stopping Obama's Secular-Socialist Machine," he explicitly linked his fate to the "tea party" movement. Given the fact that Gingrich has said he is weighing a presidential bid, it's a safe bet that others, similarly ambitious, will carefully watch how he fares.
OPINION
May 19, 2012
Re "Alternative presidential bid falters," May 16 It always seemed quixotic to launch a grass-roots movement from the top. In the unlikely scenario that a candidate was elected president, what sort of clout would she or he have in a Congress that lacked even a single supporter? By contrast, consider the "tea party. " Whether or not you agree with its agenda, it is undeniable that the dozens of representatives it helped elect have made their presence felt. Americans Elect should endorse candidates already running for Congress - whether Democratic or Republican - who meet its criteria, and put up candidates of its own in districts where none do. H.A. Drake Santa Barbara ALSO: Letters: Eugenics in America's past Letters: The media and Mitt Romney Letters: California courts feel the cuts
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By James Rainey
TAMPA, Fla. - Defeated Republican presidential candidates Michele Bachmann and Herman Cain told a Tea Party Unity rally here Sunday night that the conservative movement they championed in the primary election season has lost none of its power and will be fully engaged in the fall campaign to defeat President Obama. Bachmann told the rally of about 1,200 tea party activists gathered at the River Church  that they had “already won” by forcing the Republican Party to adhere closely to the activists' goals of small government and reduced taxes.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Ever since a wave of conservative insurgents arrived in Washington after the congressional election of 2010, Congress has careened from one tea party-inspired fiscal crisis to another, from the debt-ceiling showdown of 2011 to last year's 16-day government shutdown. But last week, when the debt ceiling needed to be raised again, conservative Republicans decided not to fight. They still voted no, but they meekly stood aside to let the ceiling rise. "You've got to know when to hold them and when to fold them," Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.)
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas fended off a tea party challenge in Tuesday's primary, easily outdistancing U.S. Rep. Steve Stockman and other GOP candidates to capture his party's nomination. The Associated Press declared Cornyn the winner as early votes showed the incumbent winning more than 6 in 10 votes. Stockman, a Houston-area congressman, drew national attention for walking out on President Obama's last State of the Union address and calling for his impeachment.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Tuesday's Texas primary will test the staying power of longtime Republican Sen. John Cornyn against a tea party challenge and the prospects for a fourth-generation politician and first-time candidate, George P. Bush. The Texas races kick off the 2014 campaign season with themes that will play out across the country this year. Cornyn is one of a host of incumbent GOP senators facing tea party opponents -- though his is not among the seats believed most threatened -- and Bush is one of several candidates trying to parlay family ties into elective office.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014
Barack Obama was first sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2009, and, from that day to this, a battle for the soul of America has been waged. The half-decade since has been one of the most politically polarized periods in U.S. history as conservative talk radio hosts, Fox News commentators, secretive billionaire campaign financiers, the NRA, the tea party movement and right wing celebrities such as Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck have all tried to delegitimize the...
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Without offering a hint as to her plans, Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Wednesday lamented the departure of longtime congressional colleagues from California -- including retiring Reps. Henry Waxman and George Miller --and said their institutional knowledge and ability to compromise in Washington would be missed. “They were creative people who could put things together and who could negotiate compromise and get it done,” she said in an interview after speaking Wednesday at a Century City dinner gathering of the Pacific Council on International Policy.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Ever since a wave of conservative insurgents arrived in Washington after the congressional election of 2010, Congress has careened from one tea party-inspired fiscal crisis to another, from the debt-ceiling showdown of 2011 to last year's 16-day government shutdown. But last week, when the debt ceiling needed to be raised again, conservative Republicans decided not to fight. They still voted no, but they meekly stood aside to let the ceiling rise. "You've got to know when to hold them and when to fold them," Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.)
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Congress gave final approval Wednesday to legislation allowing more federal borrowing to pay the nation's bills, but not without a dramatic scene in the Senate as Republican leaders scrambled to find enough votes to head off a filibuster attempt led by one of their colleagues. The House had swiftly approved the bill this week, and smooth passage was expected in the Senate, ending three years of partisan brinkmanship over the debt limit. But Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas)
OPINION
September 22, 2010 | Tim Rutten
In an afterword appended to the White House diaries he published this week, former President Carter muses, "It may be difficult for some younger readers to realize how much the Washington political scene has changed in the last 30 years. " Carter points out that the congressional bipartisanship on which he relied for his considerable number of legislative achievements no longer exists and that the "pernicious effects of partisanship have not been limited to Washington; American citizens have also become more polarized in their beliefs.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2010 | Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- When Republican leaders in Congress started talking about revisiting the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees citizenship to anyone born in the United States, the discussion appeared to many to be election season maneuvering. South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said he was hearing from constituents who wanted Republicans to take a tough stance against illegal immigration. House Minority Leader John A. Boehner and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell proposed a congressional hearing on the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Fifty years ago, Republicans across America fought a titanic civil war for ideological supremacy. The decisive battleground was California. Conservatives won, and the party turned rightward. It has veered in that direction ever since, especially in California, where Republicans have been battered bucking the natural blue tide. There have been a few exceptions, most notably when the party followed the centrist Arnold Schwarzenegger. But GOP activists never really accepted him. Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater's stunning victory over New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller in the 1964 California presidential primary was an earthquake that dramatically altered the state's political landscape.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Hard-fought passage of a $1-trillion bipartisan spending bill brings to an end - for now - the era of tea-party-driven budget battles in Congress as Republican leaders part ways with their party's rebellious hard-liners and look toward new political battles. Since grass-roots conservatives hoisted Republicans to power in the House with the 2010 midterm election, party leaders can boast that they've helped slash government spending to George W. Bush-era levels, even after Democrats increased budgets to help the nation rebound from the recession.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|