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BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
StarbucksCoffee Co. plans to continue expanding beyond its coffee cafes with its first stand-alone tea shop, which will operate under the company's Tazo brand. The store will open in the fall near Starbuck's Seattle headquarters and will feature a staffed blending bar where customers can mix their own tea from more than 80 loose-leaf choices along with iced teas, tea lattes and full-leaf tea sachets. To pair with the tea, the location in Seattle's University Village will also sell packaged chocolates, infused sugars and honey.
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NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The primary runoff for a congressional seat in Alabama, seen as a bellwether in the Republican Party's civil war , closed Tuesday with establishment-backed Bradley Byrne overtaking conservative upstart Dean Young, officials said. Byrne, a former state senator and onetime candidate for governor, was backed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, while Young had the support of tea party-aligned groups. Both Republicans are opposed to taxes and President Obama's healthcare law, and intent on reducing the scope of government.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The civil war within the GOP is playing out in Tuesday's special election in Alabama, where mainstream conservatives are working overtime to stop the ascent of a tea-party-style Republican in a primary runoff to fill a vacant congressional seat. The race provides an early look at GOP divisions heading into the 2014 congressional midterm elections as the Republican establishment, frustrated by the dominance of the party's hard-right flank, attempts to reassert its role early in the contests.
WORLD
July 8, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
I was at a tea stall near my hotel here in Srinagar, along a strip of houseboats and slowly decaying hotels known as the Boulevard, when the police patrol pulled up Wednesday morning and ordered the tea-wallahs to close down for curfew. As the workers scrambled to comply, the lead officer, identified on his lapel as Mussafar Shah, and a subordinate started striking them on their backs and legs with four-foot wooden sticks known as lathis . I took out my cellphone — in reality, the camera wasn't switched on, but I hoped its presence would stem the beatings — identified myself as press and showed my Indian media card.
FOOD
November 15, 2000
I thoroughly enjoyed Laura Calder's article on tea ("Crumpets, Tea & Co.," Nov. 1) and the other article on crumpets. I plan to try the recipes soon. I am a devoted reader of your section. Thank you for finally acknowledging those of us who choose to buck the trends and not participate in coffee madness. Though the tea article was very thorough in the tea-making process, it left one important thing out: Sources for good tea in L.A. I have been a tea drinker all my life, and am a recent transplant to Palos Verdes from Washington, D.C. I have been unable to find a place on this side of town (or anywhere in L.A., for that matter)
TRAVEL
February 16, 1997
Regarding reader Jonathan Korejko's letter ("Time for Tea," Feb. 2) in reaction to your Lincoln, England, article [in which he urged Americans to drink tea while there], I'd bet that if you shook him awake in the middle of the night back in Lincoln and asked him what he drank while in the Los Angeles area for a family reunion, he'd answer "tea"--not our American coffee. So much for leaving your tea dependency at home, English duplicity and "when in Rome . . ." theories. BILL POWELL Toluca Lake
TRAVEL
February 2, 1997
We were in the Los Angeles area for a family reunion and were delighted to see your article about Lincoln, England ("A Victorian Holiday," Dec. 15). You obviously got to know our city during your visit, and your report was well observed. We have but one criticism: Next time, leave your coffee dependency at home, and give your taste buds a holiday too! English tea is a marvelous beverage; light, warming and refreshing. Enjoyable at all times, tea is a must when you visit Lincoln.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: Guests didn't need to be British to attend Saturday's BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea Party, “but you have to love the Brits,” joked Nigel Daly, the chair of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts' L.A. chapter. The scene: Sure enough, Hollywood VIPs -- British and otherwise -- streamed nonstop into the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills to meet the organization's members and mingle with fellow BAFTA Award, Golden Globe Awards and yet-to-be-named potential Oscar nominees.  PHOTOS: Stars dress for BAFTA tea party The crowd: Among others in the crush were Sandra Bullock, writer/director Alfonso Cuaron and producers David Heyman and Gabriela Rodriguez of “Gravity;” Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi, director Paul Greengrass, writer Billy Ray and producer Dana Brunetti of “Captain Phillips;” Bradley Cooper, director David O. Russell, and producers Charles Roven and Richard Suckle of “American Hustle;” Leonardo DiCaprio, director Martin Scorsese and producer Joey McFarland of “Wolf of Wall Street;” Chiwetel Ejiofor, Benedict Cumberbatch, Michael Fassbender, director Steve McQueen and writer John Ridley of “12 Years a Slave;” Cate Blanchett and Sally Hawkins of “Blue Jasmine;” Jacqueline Bisset of “Dancing on the Edge;” Rebecca Ferguson, Janet McTeer, James Frain and writer Emma Frost of “The White Queen;” Daniel Bruhl of “Rush;” Steve Coogan and producers Tracey Seaward and Gaby Tana of “Philomena;”...
NATIONAL
April 18, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Greg Mortenson's “Three Cups of Tea” purports to describe the Montana philanthropist's harrowing adventures in Pakistan that led him to launch a charity for building schools in the impoverished region. But did it really happen the way he said it did? And if not, are readers entitled to their money back? That was the subject of a federal court hearing Wednesday in Great Falls, Mont., where Mortenson and his publishers are seeking dismissal of a lawsuit that aims to obtain class-action relief for book-buyers allegedly defrauded by purported fabrications in the book and its sequel, “Stones into Schools.” The Montana attorney general already has completed an investigation into charges that Mortenson and the Bozeman-based Central Asia Institute he co-founded mishandled money donated to the popular charity, substantiating many of the financial allegations.
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