Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTeachers
IN THE NEWS

Teachers

OPINION
February 15, 2014
Last Saturday's featured letter by former Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education member Yolie Flores - in which she told of a crying parent's plea to save the job of his autistic child's teacher - has drawn a handful of spirited responses. Some readers said Flores' experience shows the absurdity of using seniority instead of effectiveness to determine which teachers get laid off; others say blaming teachers for the district's woes doesn't help. Flores' letter commented on a lawsuit weighing teacher tenure, a topic that tends to generate substantive yet polarized commentary from readers.
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Foster
The news that Jim Fregosi died today brought sadness. He was one of the franchise's first stars, a catalyst in the 1970 chase for the American League West championship. He got the franchise that banner nearly a decade later, when he managed the Angels to their first division title. Death is personal, and this one was hard for me. We weren't close. I enjoyed the handful of times I interviewed him, but I couldn't say we had any sort of relationship, at least from his perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
CBS has set midseason premiere days for the new comedy "Bad Teacher" and returning drama "Unforgettable. " "Bad Teacher," based on the 2011 film starring Cameron Diaz, will premiere April 24 at 9:30 p.m. after "The Crazy Ones" finishes its full 22-episode first season on April 17. The series stars Ari Graynor as a former trophy wife who masquerades as a teacher in order to find a new man after her wealthy husband leaves her. The comedy costars...
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Larry Sand
Ted Rall's Feb. 6 blog post and cartoon, "Stop tenure tyranny and show some love for our hardworking teachers," is long on demagoguery and little else. Even the title of the piece misses the mark. Contrary to what Rall writes , teachers in California's public schools do not get tenure. What they achieve after two years on the job is "permanent status. " What other job affords workers something called permanence? And getting rid of an underperforming teacher who has reached that lofty perch is just about impossible.
OPINION
February 8, 2014
Re "Deasy provides fodder for both sides in lawsuit," Feb. 3 In his testimony during the trial on teacher tenure, former Sacramento Unified School District Supt. Jonathan Raymond described the pain of having to lay off his son's teacher - one of the top five teachers he'd ever seen. It reminded me of when a dad came before the Los Angeles Unified School District's Board of Education during a debate on layoffs. He spoke about his son, who had autism and had spent years with teachers who could not reach him. Not only was he not learning, he was also spiraling down in terms of his motivation and interest in school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Parents, students and community members rallied Friday in front of Crenshaw High School against the removal of the school's longtime choir director, who was reassigned while under investigation by the Los Angeles Unified School District. Iris Stevenson, who leads Crenshaw's award-winning choir, was removed from the school in December and is reporting to work at district offices - sometimes referred to as "teacher jails" - that house instructors who are facing allegations of misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Black and Latino students are more likely to get ineffective teachers in Los Angeles schools than white and Asian students, according to a new study by a Harvard researcher. The findings were released this week during a trial challenging the way California handles the dismissal, lay off and tenure process for teachers.  In the study , professor Thomas J. Kane concluded that the worst teachers - in the bottom 5%--taught 3.2% of white students and 5.4% of Latino students. If ineffective teachers were evenly distributed, you'd expect that 5% of each group of students would have these low-rated instructors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
Parents, students and community members rallied Friday in front of Crenshaw High School against the removal of the school's longtime choir director, who was reassigned while under investigation by the Los Angeles Unified School District. Iris Stevenson, who leads Crenshaw's award-winning choir, was removed from the school in December and is reporting to work at district offices - often called “teacher jails” - that house instructors who are facing allegations of misconduct. District officials would not comment on the specific allegations, citing privacy laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | Alicia Banks
Martin Byhower has trekked across Chadwick School's Palos Verdes Peninsula campus for 30 years. Fossils scattered across the hilltop grounds often caught the eye of the seventh-grade life sciences teacher. Two years ago, he spotted one that particularly interested him. And on Wednesday, staff from the Natural History Museum excavated it and carefully loaded it onto the bed of a truck. Soon, researchers will begin cleaning it to learn more. This much is known: It appears to be the skull of a juvenile sperm whale, and it is 12 million to 15 million years old. Byhower contacted different groups to ask them to identify the fossil; he got a response from the county museum.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Ted Rall, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
My mother retired recently from teaching under pretty much the best possible working conditions one could expect in an American high school: She taught high school French in an Ohio suburb that is at least 90% white, ranging from middle to upper middle class. By the end of her career, she was relatively decently paid. Her students weren't hobbled by poverty or challenged due to not having mastered English. Since French was an elective, her kids pretty much wanted to be there (though the possibility of having the class cut because of low enrollment was a worry)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|