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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999
America's teaching hospitals are acclaimed for their use of advanced medicine to save patients. In August, for instance, doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully labored around the clock on two young boys--one of them critically wounded--who were shot at a Granada Hills Jewish center.
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OPINION
April 3, 2013
Re "Our big appetite for healthcare," Opinion, March 31 Dr. Daniel J. Stone mentions "the Starbucks syndrome in healthcare" when blaming the overutilization of resources on patient demand and doctor apathy. His solutions are accountable care organizations - networks of physicians, hospitals and patients working efficiently to keep costs down - and Choosing Wisely, which appears to be an altruistic approach to cost control. These solutions are doomed unless cost control is mandated from the top. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs commands the lowest prices for drugs and other medical necessities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1985
The teaching hospital, a critically important element in the American health care system, urgently requires special financing if the future of the institution is to be assured. That is the timely warning emerging from "Prescription for Change," the report of the Commonwealth Fund's Task Force on Academic Health Centers. National health cost-cutting measures now being implemented, however well-intentioned, place at risk the teaching hospital, the task force found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2011 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Doctors Medical Center in San Pablo is among the most troubled hospitals in California. By 2006, it was so strapped financially that it turned to San Quentin prison for patients — knowing that the state, at least, would pay its bill. That backfired when a sex offender serving 100-plus years managed to undo his manacles and briefly escape through a fire door, causing a top police official to accuse administrators of skimping on safety for easy money. In 2008, the state hit the hospital three times with its highest possible penalties for lapses in patient care, including a death after a catheter was incorrectly inserted into a patient's vein.
OPINION
August 6, 2000 | Albert Carnesale, Albert Carnesale is chancellor of UCLA
Some critics contend that university presidents and chancellors spend too much time raising money and not enough on academic matters. I confess I do spend a good bit of time thinking about funding for public universities--and worrying about it, particularly about the future of the nation's teaching hospitals. Public resources for higher education are shrinking relative to need.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | PHIL GALEWITZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The University of Pennsylvania Health System is laying off 20% of its workers after losing $300 million during the last two years. The University of Oklahoma sold control of its hospitals in 1998 to Columbia/HCA Healthcare after losing $15 million in the seven months before the deal. And the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, which has lost more than $80 million since 1998, is rationing care to the poor by cutting off free doctor visits, prescription drugs and hospitalizations.
NEWS
July 21, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The financial future of two dozen of the nation's most prominent municipal teaching hospitals--including County-USC Medical Center and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center here--is gravely threatened, along with the health care of masses of poorer people, according to several new studies.
OPINION
December 2, 2001 | GERALD S. LEVEY and HARVEY KIBEL
Just when Americans are turning to their major metropolitan medical centers as the first line of defense against bioterrorism, federal agencies are getting ready to yank critical funding from these beleaguered institutions. And while this will affect hospitals across the country, California will be hit the hardest.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battered by insurance companies looking for bargains and terrified of cuts proposed by President Clinton in their Medicare payments, officials of some of the nation's most prestigious hospitals say they are worried about the future of their institutions. Most severely squeezed are the teaching hospitals that train many of the nation's doctors and the massive urban hospitals that serve poor communities as everything from family doctor's office to surgical center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
The aged baby-boom generation will be retiring in massive numbers within the next two decades, and the federal government is paying teaching hospitals not to train doctors (Aug. 24). That sounds like great pre-planning to me. SUSAN REIMERS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Stanley van den Noort, the UC Irvine neurologist who championed the early treatment of multiple sclerosis patients and who, as dean of the university's school of medicine, fought a 12-year losing battle to construct a major teaching hospital on campus, has died. He was 79. Van den Noort died Wednesday at his home in Tustin of complications from a brain injury he suffered two years earlier, his family said. Van den Noort built a large and successful MS practice at UC Irvine, drawing patients from throughout the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
The program to train cardiologists at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center has been stripped of its national accreditation by the Chicago-based Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The decision, which takes effect in a year, marks the first time a residency or fellowship program at the Boyle Heights facility has lost accreditation.
OPINION
February 14, 2005
Re "King/Drew at a Critical Point," editorial, Feb. 7: We concur with Navigant that Charles Drew University of Medicine is an asset and strength to King/Drew Medical Center. Many of our nation's best hospitals are affiliated with a university. This community deserves excellence in care, and excellence in care is associated with teaching hospitals. King/Drew has distinguished itself from other similar public or private institutions by investing in academic programs to train physicians and allied health workers to specifically care for Los Angeles' sickest and poorest populations.
HEALTH
May 10, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Access to healthcare, it seems, doesn't ensure quality. Americans get only half the recommended medical care and screenings from their doctors, a new report says, even if they live in metropolitan areas with noted teaching hospitals. It makes no difference whether the setting is Orange County, Cleveland or Greenville, S.C., or whether patients are insured or uninsured, according to a new Rand Corp. study of 12 metropolitan areas with at least 200,000 people.
NEWS
May 3, 2003 | Gail V. Anderson Jr., Gail V. Anderson Jr. is medical director at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and assistant dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
Lost in the publicity about the Los Angeles County public health-care system's continuing fiscal challenge is a serious inequity in federal funding of the county's renowned physician-training programs. The county's public teaching hospitals -- Harbor-UCLA, County-USC, King-Drew, Olive View-UCLA and Rancho Los Amigos -- not only are critical parts of the health-care safety net but also are important sources of well-trained doctors for our community and nation. These five hospitals train about 1.
HEALTH
October 21, 2002 | Trudy Lieberman, Special to The Times
When choosing health insurance this fall, many consumers will notice something new that's going to affect their pocketbooks. It used to be that it didn't matter which hospital your doctor sent you to -- you'd pay the same amount out of pocket. But some of California's largest medical insurers are pushing new health plans that will require you to pay more to go to hospitals that insurers consider too pricey.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | Reuters
Doctors in training opposed to abortion on moral grounds do not to have to undergo training in the procedure, the medical accreditation council said Friday in clarifying its controversial recommendation earlier in the week. The council, whose accreditation is needed by teaching hospitals to qualify for federal funding, had recommended that resident gynecologists and obstetricians receive training in abortion procedures, triggering an angry response from pro-life advocates.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York, Presbyterian Hospitals to Merge: Merger of the two hospitals would create one of the largest not-for-profit health-care systems in the country, with 2,600 beds. It is the third big merger among New York's private teaching hospitals in the last month. When completed, under the name the New York & Presbyterian Hospitals Health-Care System, the transaction would bring together more than 20 hospitals and other health-care institutions throughout the city. Their combined revenue exceeds $2.
OPINION
June 14, 2002 | GAIL V. ANDERSON Jr., Dr. Gail V. Anderson Jr. is medical director of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and assistant dean at the UCLA School of Medicine. The views expressed here are his own.
Last month, a 10-year-old girl riding her bike home from school landed in the hospital after she was struck by a car and dragged for a distance. After stabilizing her, the hospital transferred her to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center for special surgical care. Last fall at a Carson construction site, the roof of a giant sewage tank collapsed, impaling two workers with steel rods and injuring nine others. Harbor trauma experts provided critical surgical care.
OPINION
December 2, 2001 | GERALD S. LEVEY and HARVEY KIBEL
Just when Americans are turning to their major metropolitan medical centers as the first line of defense against bioterrorism, federal agencies are getting ready to yank critical funding from these beleaguered institutions. And while this will affect hospitals across the country, California will be hit the hardest.
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