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SPORTS
November 30, 2009 | Bill Dwyre
Fifty years ago this month, Nov. 22, 1959, to be exact, the Minnesota Vikings ran a reverse play that could have totally defeated the wannabe American Football League. Yet somehow, the AFL survived, flourished and eventually merged with the big guy, the National Football League. The man in the middle of all this, and greatly responsible for what the San Diego Chargers have become, is 82 years old now and is better known for hotels than football teams. But Barron Hilton, the retired chief executive of the Hilton Hotel Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward P. Roski Jr., who is bidding to land a National Football League expansion for a refurbished Los Angeles Coliseum, owns a casino in Las Vegas--an apparent conflict under league rules. Roski operates the Silverton Hotel Casino and RV Park, which he opened about 18 months ago when the previous casino went bust. Roski--who owns the property--had been leasing the site to operators of the Boomtown casino.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 2006 | Pat Jordan, Pat Jordan has written 15 books, including the baseball memoir "A False Spring."
Frank tells stories in the Irish way, with a Boston accent and a faint stutter. Long, elaborate, convoluted stories, all curlicues and digressions, swirling back on themselves, redundant, pointless, spinning and spinning and spinning, but apparently going nowhere, until, miraculously, they begin to rise in a masterful flourish like a baroque concerto from Handel, rising and rising to a deafening crescendo, the point.
SPORTS
August 23, 1998 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine Mayor Christina Shea received a curious telephone call last fall. The caller told Shea he represented an NBA team interested in moving to the city, though he declined to identify himself or the team. That unsolicited call, sketchy as it was, resuscitated spirits in the offices of the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim. Tony Guanci, a Newport Beach resident and a sports industry consultant, was the mystery caller.
SPORTS
January 6, 2001 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the throttle stuck approaching a big jump and Jeff Emig and his motorcycle were launched about 45 feet into the air, he had one thought as he separated from his bike and felt the long drop ahead of him: "This can't be happening." Emig's motocross-supercross racing career ended May 4 when he crushed a vertebra and broke his leg in two places on a Glen Helen practice track. Now, he is fully consumed in the second stage of his storied, but not always storybook, career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1987
Are we being taken advantage of by football team owners? After reading the editorial, it is very clear that the taxpayers' money is practically being taken from under our noses. While hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent in keeping professional sports franchises where they are, it is people like Al Davis, owner of the Raiders, who do not care one way or the other about packing up and moving. We also have to deal with cities such as Irwindale, that offer financing, trying to lure, entice and even hijack our teams away from us. Unless American cities counteract this sports terrorism by either refusing to pay ransom to any team or letting the wealthy team owners build their own stadiums, it is not the sports fan that will win, but the club owners who will have the last laugh at the taxpayers' expense.
SPORTS
May 25, 1992 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raj Bhathal is living the American dream in more ways than one. As owner of a pro football team, the Newport Beach resident finds himself in one of the most select and sought-after clubs in the nation. Bhathal's team is the World League's Orlando Thunder. "It's really exciting," Bhathal said. "I've been in business for 26 years and have been very successful and this new venture is great." But Bhathal is no wealthy neophyte meddling in the team's day-to-day operations.
SPORTS
September 18, 1992 | Associated Press
Manager Lou Piniella of the Cincinnati Reds wrestled with relief pitcher Rob Dibble in the clubhouse at Riverfront Stadium Thursday night after a 3-2 victory over the Atlanta Braves that only slowed the Braves' NL West title drive. The Reds trail the Braves by 9 1/2 games in the National League West and Atlanta's magic number for clinching is eight. About a half-hour after Steve Foster got his first major-league save, Dibble plunged the Reds into another controversy.
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