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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Jimmy Hoffa never drove a truck for a living but he turned the Teamsters into the largest and strongest union of its day. He trafficked with thugs but used a sophisticated grasp of the intricacies of trucking industry economics to consolidate his gains. A devoted family man who never developed champagne tastes, he disappeared on July 30, 1975, probably a victim of organized crime. He was a complex, contradictory personality whose life might have made an exceptional movie. It hasn't quite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Every man has his price. What's yours? --Jimmy Hoffa If Danny DeVito were a rubber band, he'd be ready to snap. For two days, the director has been trying to shoot a complicated sequence in "Hoffa," which stars Jack Nicholson as Jimmy Hoffa, dark prince of the American labor movement. Nothing is going right. The sound is garbled. Extras knock over chairs. A flock of pigeons flies across the sound stage's cavernous rafters, making a racket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995
It is clear that Alexander Cockburn did not speak to any rank-and-file Teamsters before he wrote his glib smear on Jimmy Hoffa Jr. and tried to portray incumbent Teamster President Ron Carey as a David figure trying to sling the mob Goliath (Column Left, Nov. 3). Indeed, the facts on Carey's stewardship over the last four years are not pretty. I know the Carey record firsthand, because I ran on his slate in 1991 and was one of his biggest supporters until the reality of his dictatorial and deceitful personality became obvious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1988
The federal government's 30-year effort to clean up the International Brotherhood of Teamsters sometimes seems like something out of mythology--perhaps the tale of Sisyphus. Like the king of Corinth, doomed forever in Hades to roll a heavy stone uphill only to see it roll back down, the government has found real progress elusive.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Although FedEx Corp. was built on a cargo airline, its trucking business is now a big-time moneymaker and a tough competitor for its chief rival, United Parcel Service Inc. But the shipping giant's trucking division, FedEx Ground Package System Inc., is embroiled in a growing labor fight that could raise operating costs by millions and lead to an overhaul of its workforce.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2005 | James Flanigan
The Fourth of July weekend seems like a good time to examine some of the heat and rhetoric lately surrounding one of the basic building blocks of our society: immigration. There is widespread concern that too many immigrants are coming in and, worse, that waves of unskilled workers will form a permanent underclass and change the historic dynamic of American society. These are serious matters. Immigration is part of the DNA of America, and it's as necessary today as ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Elizabeth Taylor and Welsh actor Richard Burton divorced in 1973, she offered a lofty explanation for the breakup: "We have loved each other too much." After she filed for divorce Monday from her seventh husband, construction worker Larry Fortensky, her explanation was prosaic: "irreconcilable differences." "The whole thing will be worked out amicably between Elizabeth and Larry," said Taylor's attorney, Neil Papiano.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2002 | Bloomberg News
The union representing 40,000 engineers at Union Pacific Corp. and other railroads tentatively agreed to merge with the Teamsters, the largest transportation union, to raise bargaining power. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and the Teamsters this week set up committees that in the next six months will work out details such as dues, Teamsters spokesman Rob Black said. Members of the Cleveland-based engineers union still have to vote on the merger, said BLE spokesman John Bentley.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1998 | Reuters
James P. Hoffa expanded his lead over rival Tom Leedham in the Teamsters union presidential election Friday as ballot counting moved into eastern states expected to be friendly to Leedham. In the second day of counting by federal election authorities, with one-quarter of the approximately 400,000 ballots tallied, Hoffa was leading with 53.4% of the vote. Leedham, a Teamsters leader from Portland, Ore., was second, at 40.6%, followed by John Metz of St. Louis, at 6%.
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