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BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to choosing broadband Internet providers, you can't always get what you want. But with certain limitations, you can get what you need. If you use the Internet regularly, chances are you already have broadband -- that is, a high-speed hookup, usually through your cable television provider or phone company. But are you getting it at the right speed and right price? There are more choices than ever, even though you typically have to go with a provider that serves your neighborhood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
PCM Inc., an El Segundo company that sells information technology products and services, has attracted little attention in more than a quarter-century of business. But that soon may change. The owner of a competing company has starting snapping up PCM's stock, raising speculation of a possible takeover. Firoz Lalji, chairman of technology company Zones Inc. in Auburn, Wash., now owns about 5% of PCM, according to a regulatory filing. And he called PCM "one of the poorest-performing companies in its industry.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Los Angeles City Council may soon decide whether to make new technology available citywide that would allow emergency vehicles to control street lights in their path. Early next week, the council is expected to hear a motion introduced by Councilman Richard Alarcon that would instruct city, fire and police department officials to study the feasibility of installing the technology at key, congested intersections throughout the city.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Willman
WASHINGTON - Amid concerns about its effectiveness and multibillion-dollar cost, the Department of Homeland Security has canceled plans to install an automated technology that was meant to speed the 24-hour operations of BioWatch, the national system for detecting a biological attack. The cancellation of the "Generation 3" acquisition was made Thursday at the direction of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, according to a memorandum circulated by Michael V. Walter, the BioWatch program manager.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Electronics retailer Sharper Image Corp. agreed Friday to stop selling personal breathalyzers and pay $1.2 million in restitution as part of a settlement regarding the devices. The company incorrectly claimed the digital breath alcohol testers were accurate to 0.001 of a percentage point of blood-alcohol content, according to tests by San Diego's Consumer Protection Unit. Sharper Image also agreed to pay $100,000 in penalties for inaccurately advertising the effectiveness of the testers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Rising 10 stories next to the Hollywood Freeway, the sleek, stucco-and-glass building looks more like a backdrop for television's "L.A. Law" than a prison designed to house some of the most notorious criminal suspects in Southern California. Kevin Mitnick, the 25-year-old computer genius accused of breaking into university and corporate computers from Los Angeles to Leeds, England, now calls it home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after an aerial embolism from a high-altitude glider flight ruined his boyhood dream of becoming a fighter pilot, Lance Cpl. Howard A. Foote Jr. of Los Alamitos flew into Marine Corps history and the end of his military career. Under cover of darkness five years ago, the 20-year-old aviation mechanic stole an A-4M Skyhawk from El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and put the aging fighter-bomber through a series of high-speed maneuvers over the black waters of the Pacific.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines and Apple Computer on Wednesday signed their wide-ranging cooperation agreement, a landmark accord that includes the establishment of two joint venture companies and extensive sharing of technologies. The two computer firms, once bitter rivals, stunned the industry when they announced the outlines of the agreement in July.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of companies is steadily staking claim to a piece of the communications future. For now, these promising firms are mostly hidden among a glut of "dot-com" ventures. That obscurity, however, is not likely to last. That's because this group of companies is harnessing the power of next-generation networks that carry phone and Internet traffic together, making possible a host of new services that combine the strengths of both phones and computers.
OPINION
June 1, 2012
Re "Oracle vs. Google," Editorial, May 29 If a federal court holds that application programming interfaces (APIs) are copyrightable, the ruling will have no consequence. An API is an interface, like the key slot in your car. It can be changed while still performing the same functions. An API can have things moved, changed and added without copyright issues because only the appearance has changed. The reverse is also true: APIs, like key slots, can appear exactly the same, yet the under the hood, the mechanics are completely different.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Maeve Reston
DURHAM, Ore. - Oregon officials will vote Friday on whether to become the first state to scrap its troubled insurance exchange and switch to the federal system, after spending an estimated $248 million on an ambitious exchange that failed in spectacular fashion. Not a single insurance seeker was able to enroll online in a private plan under the Affordable Care Act in this high-tech state, which has long prided itself on healthcare innovation and whose governor is a former emergency room doctor.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A procedure that uses a series of electric jolts to inject lab-designed DNA molecules into cells of the inner ear may help to regrow auditory nerves in people with profound hearing loss, according to researchers. In a paper published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine , Australian researchers said they used tiny electrodes and gene therapy to regenerate nerve cells in chemically deafened guinea pigs. The procedure, they said, may one day improve the functioning of human cochlear implants -- electronic devices that provide hearing sensations to the deaf.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
For almost a month, Kansas Citians lived through what amounted to a horror movie without an ending. According to the narrative described in court documents, it would take cutting-edge and occasionally controversial law enforcement technology, including license-plate readers, to put an end to the horror show. The story of this very 21st century hunt began playing out on the tangle of freeways just south of Kansas City, Mo., where, starting in March, one driver after another reported being shot at by a mystery gunman - nobody they knew, for reasons nobody could fathom.
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
Another plunge in once-soaring technology stocks sent the Nasdaq composite index into a triple-digit decline and pushed the rest of the stock market down with it. Erstwhile darlings such as Netflix Inc. and Facebook Inc., as well as biotechnology highfliers such as Intercept Pharmaceuticals Inc., sank as investors rushed to cash in what remained of earlier profits. As of 10:55 a.m. Pacific, the Nasdaq composite index was down 107.50 points, or 2.6%, to 4,076.41. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The Dow Jones industrial average skidded 176.57 points, or 1.1%, to 16,260.61.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Charlotte Allen, guest blogger
The New York Times ran a sob story last weekend about a woman who quit tech because she was shocked, shocked by the gross behavior of men in tech: “Elissa Shevinsky can pinpoint the moment when she felt that she no longer belonged. “She was at a friend's house last Sept. 8, watching the live stream of the TechCrunch Disrupt hackathon on her laptop and iPhone. Entrepreneurs were showing off their products, and two young Australian men, David Boulton and Jethro Batts, stood behind the podium to give their presentation . 'Titstare is an app where you take photos of yourself staring at tits,' Mr. Boulton began, as photographs of women's chests on a cellphone flashed on the screen behind him….
BUSINESS
September 29, 1998
BEA Systems Inc. agreed to buy closely held WebLogic Inc. for $192.5 million in stock. The deal would give the San Jose-based corporate software maker WebLogic's Internet technology to add to its product line.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The "Heartbleed" software flaw that triggered alarm bells around the world could fundamentally undermine two decades' worth of efforts to persuade consumers they could trust the Web to securely handle such tasks as buying a pair of shoes and applying for a job. The discovery of a gaping hole in a piece of software that was supposed to protect personal information from hackers left websites rushing to fix the bug while consumers struggled to understand...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
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