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February 4, 2014 | By Matthew Fleischer, guest blogger, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
The recent spritz of rain notwithstanding, California is in the midst of what Gov. Jerry Brown called “perhaps the worst drought [the state] has ever seen.” And yet, despite the desperate state of affairs, every day the city of Los Angeles flushes hundreds of millions of gallons of potentially potable water out to sea. I'm talking about treated sewage. In 2000, Los Angeles actually completed a sewage reclamation plant capable of providing water to 120,000 homes - the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to choosing broadband Internet providers, you can't always get what you want. But with certain limitations, you can get what you need. If you use the Internet regularly, chances are you already have broadband -- that is, a high-speed hookup, usually through your cable television provider or phone company. But are you getting it at the right speed and right price? There are more choices than ever, even though you typically have to go with a provider that serves your neighborhood.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The "Heartbleed" software flaw that triggered alarm bells around the world could fundamentally undermine two decades' worth of efforts to persuade consumers they could trust the Web to securely handle such tasks as buying a pair of shoes and applying for a job. The discovery of a gaping hole in a piece of software that was supposed to protect personal information from hackers left websites rushing to fix the bug while consumers struggled to understand...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Los Angeles City Council may soon decide whether to make new technology available citywide that would allow emergency vehicles to control street lights in their path. Early next week, the council is expected to hear a motion introduced by Councilman Richard Alarcon that would instruct city, fire and police department officials to study the feasibility of installing the technology at key, congested intersections throughout the city.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Electronics retailer Sharper Image Corp. agreed Friday to stop selling personal breathalyzers and pay $1.2 million in restitution as part of a settlement regarding the devices. The company incorrectly claimed the digital breath alcohol testers were accurate to 0.001 of a percentage point of blood-alcohol content, according to tests by San Diego's Consumer Protection Unit. Sharper Image also agreed to pay $100,000 in penalties for inaccurately advertising the effectiveness of the testers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Rising 10 stories next to the Hollywood Freeway, the sleek, stucco-and-glass building looks more like a backdrop for television's "L.A. Law" than a prison designed to house some of the most notorious criminal suspects in Southern California. Kevin Mitnick, the 25-year-old computer genius accused of breaking into university and corporate computers from Los Angeles to Leeds, England, now calls it home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days after an aerial embolism from a high-altitude glider flight ruined his boyhood dream of becoming a fighter pilot, Lance Cpl. Howard A. Foote Jr. of Los Alamitos flew into Marine Corps history and the end of his military career. Under cover of darkness five years ago, the 20-year-old aviation mechanic stole an A-4M Skyhawk from El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and put the aging fighter-bomber through a series of high-speed maneuvers over the black waters of the Pacific.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines and Apple Computer on Wednesday signed their wide-ranging cooperation agreement, a landmark accord that includes the establishment of two joint venture companies and extensive sharing of technologies. The two computer firms, once bitter rivals, stunned the industry when they announced the outlines of the agreement in July.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of companies is steadily staking claim to a piece of the communications future. For now, these promising firms are mostly hidden among a glut of "dot-com" ventures. That obscurity, however, is not likely to last. That's because this group of companies is harnessing the power of next-generation networks that carry phone and Internet traffic together, making possible a host of new services that combine the strengths of both phones and computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Brett Berk
My Grandma Bobbie is 93 and lives on her own, in a spotless condo decorated with enviable midcentury furnishings. The daughter of a General Motors millwright, she grew up in Detroit riding the streetcar, but one of her goals was to get to the promised land - the suburbs - and preferably by car. For my grandmother, like many older people in her cohort, a car is not only a convenience or a luxury - though it is that; Grandma loved Lincolns and Cadillacs...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Matthew Vella certainly doesn't look like a troll. Vella is the regular-guy chief executive of Acacia Research Corp., which calls itself a patent outsource licensing company. The Newport Beach firm links up with inventors who fear that others are elbowing in on their patents or whose patents aren't making the money they could. "Our clients often can't afford to hire specialists that will help turn those patents into money," Vella said. "They are not looking to sell them necessarily, but if they are looking to get money because people are infringing their patents, we want to be their partner.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
It's long been the stuff of science fiction, the ability to wear a headset and feel as if you're in another world. Creating an affordable virtual reality device for the mass market has been the holy grail of sorts for game developers and futurists. Now Facebook's $2-billion purchase of Oculus may bring that dream one step closer to reality. Virtual reality enthusiasts say they've been waiting for decades for the technology to take off and have been developing headsets and content in the hopes they could soon have mainstream appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler under fire for contaminating nearby homes with lead and threatening the health of more than 100,000 people with its arsenic emissions is in trouble once again for emitting more than the permitted level of lead, according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District. As a result, the agency will order Exide to curtail its operations by 15%. On March 22 and 23, an air monitor on the northeast side of the Exide Technologies plant, near the Los Angeles River, picked up lead levels that were high enough to cause the outdoor air concentration to exceed 0.15 micrograms per cubic meter based on a 30-day average - a violation of rules designed to protect public health.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | W.J. Hennigan
As the Pentagon moves beyond the relatively low-tech wars in the Middle East and turns its attention to future national security challenges, it has doubled down on sophisticated new radar-jamming devices that aim to render adversaries' air defenses useless. Although the U.S. faced limited resistance in the skies above Iraq and Afghanistan, that would not be the case in Asia, where the Obama administration plans to shift its diplomatic focus and strengthen its defense strategy in the coming decade.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - A tussle involving a woman wearing Google Glass in a San Francisco bar is just the latest incident to highlight growing tensions over the new wearable technology even before Google Inc. begins selling it to the public. Sarah Slocum, a 34-year-old technology blogger and social media consultant, said she was "verbally and physically assaulted" over the weekend by patrons of a bar in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood. A man allegedly ripped the Glass off Slocum's face and ran out of the bar with it. She got the Glass back but says someone stole her purse and phone.
OPINION
June 1, 2012
Re "Oracle vs. Google," Editorial, May 29 If a federal court holds that application programming interfaces (APIs) are copyrightable, the ruling will have no consequence. An API is an interface, like the key slot in your car. It can be changed while still performing the same functions. An API can have things moved, changed and added without copyright issues because only the appearance has changed. The reverse is also true: APIs, like key slots, can appear exactly the same, yet the under the hood, the mechanics are completely different.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Despite a wealth of technology, crews trying to find the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner must cover a large swath of the South China Sea that varies widely in depth and is subject to fast-moving currents that could carry debris more than 50 miles a day, experts say. The search for the missing Boeing 777 off the southern coast of Vietnam had yielded nothing by early Tuesday. Malaysian and Vietnamese authorities said they had yet to find anything linked to the airliner that carried 239 passengers and crew, and that the search area was being expanded and the operation "intensified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
Elevated levels of lead have been found in the soil of homes and a preschool near a battery recycling plant in Vernon, prompting officials to issue health warnings and order more testing in adjacent neighborhoods. State toxic waste regulators said the initial results from 39 homes as well as two schools concerned them enough that they have directed Exide Technologies to create a plan to protect children and pregnant women living in affected homes, as well as perform the additional testing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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