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Ted Briseno

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April 23, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sgt. Charles L. Duke Jr., a decorated Los Angeles police officer who testified for the defense in the Rodney G. King federal civil rights trial, said Thursday that the jury in the case erred in two ways: by convicting two of the officers and by acquitting the only one he believes was guilty. Duke accused Officer Theodore J. Briseno of stalking King throughout the incident in Lake View Terrace and maliciously stomping him near the end of the beating.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The much-anticipated U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments Tuesday in the case of two police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights were a casualty of the snowstorm that has gripped the northeastern United States since the weekend. Although the Supreme Court has been virtually the only government institution in Washington to put in full workdays this week, William Kopeny, who was planning to present the argument for Officer Laurence M.
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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Los Angeles police officers indicted in the Rodney G. King case have told department investigators that they feared for their lives during the beating of the motorist and were ready to shoot him if necessary. The officers' first detailed account of their actions is contained in a comprehensive 314-page Los Angeles Police Department Internal Affairs report on the incident, obtained Monday by The Times.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of legal battles and social upheaval, the case that helped shape the modern history of Los Angeles makes its way this week to the nation's highest court, where government lawyers and attorneys for two former police officers will engage in what could be the last debate of the Rodney G. King beating. As the saga marks yet another milestone, the principals still are battling to put their lives in order.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A high school honors student, a devoted father of five, a small-town cop from Kansas and a kid brother who followed his older brother across the country--these are the four Los Angeles police officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King. At least two have histories of disciplinary action and two have some time in college. One joined the department less than a year ago. One was raised by parents who brought multiracial foster children into their home.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. District Judge John G. Davies meticulously laid out his version of what happened during the beating of Rodney G. King, he minimized the illegal conduct of Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell. But, at the same time, Davies' controversial factual findings also cast a shadow across one of their acquitted colleagues--Officer Theodore J. Briseno, the only one of the four accused officers who has any chance of getting his job back.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial finally saw the videotaped testimony of Theodore J. Briseno on Tuesday after prosecutors prevailed in a hard-fought battle to introduce the tape as evidence against the police officers who beat and arrested King. Immediately after the tape was shown, federal prosecutors surprised defense lawyers by resting their case without calling another witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
District attorney officials, saying that more than three Los Angeles police officers should be prosecuted for the videotaped beating of an Altadena man, announced Friday they will seek grand jury indictments in an attempt to speed the volatile case through the criminal justice system. Also Friday, Assistant Dist. Atty. Curt Livesay said his office has decided against prosecuting Rodney G.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At least four Los Angeles police officers were indicted Thursday by a county grand jury investigating the videotaped attack on a motorist who had been stopped for speeding. The indictments were sealed and the precise allegations and number of indictments issued by the grand jury were not known. According to their attorneys and a law enforcement source, four of the 15 officers present at the beating were indicted and were ordered to surrender in court today.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Stacey C. Koon, police sergeant and defendant, stood unnoticed at the back of the room. This was Thursday, the first day of trial for the four Los Angeles cops accused of beating Rodney G. King beyond all reason, and Koon was waiting for his lawyer to finish an impromptu news conference and go to lunch. Koon wore a blue banker's suit and a thin, stiff smile. The smile receded when he realized he had been spotted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by Theodore J. Briseno, a key figure in the Rodney G. King police beating case who was trying to get his job back with the Los Angeles Police Department. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies, who presided over the federal civil rights case against Briseno and three other former officers involved in the 1991 beating of King during a traffic stop, granted the city's motion to dismiss the suit late last week, City Atty. James Hahn said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | DWAYNE BRAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Los Angeles Police Officer Theodore J. Briseno probably lied under oath during the 1992 Simi Valley trial of officers charged in the beating of Rodney G. King, according to the results of a little-known, 10-month investigation released Monday by Ventura County prosecutors. But perjury charges will not be filed against him because the testimony did not affect the outcome of the trial of Briseno and three fellow officers, prosecutors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council could not agree Wednesday whether to pay the legal bills of the two police officers acquitted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. In a closed-door session, six council members voted in favor of paying the officers a total of $250,000 to put an end to the King matter. Seven others feared that making the payment might somehow endorse the officers' conduct. The issue may be taken up again Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
A police officer who kicked Rodney G. King has been fired, a month after a disciplinary panel ruled he used excessive force during the videotaped beating. Police Chief Willie L. Williams signed the order firing Theodore J. Briseno on Thursday. The 12-year veteran was suspended without pay after the March 3, 1991, beating of King. "I'm sorry for Ted; he's been through hell," said Harland Braun, one of Briseno's lawyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A police Board of Rights on Tuesday recommended that Officer Theodore J. Briseno be fired from the Los Angeles Police Department, finding the suspended officer guilty of unnecessarily kicking Rodney G. King during the notorious 1991 police beating. The decision, rendered by a three-member board, must be approved within five days by Police Chief Willie L. Williams. If Williams follows the board's recommendation, Briseno will take the department to court, Briseno's lawyer said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officer Theodore J. Briseno bitterly accused the Los Angeles Police Department on Friday of wasting taxpayers money--and possibly breaking the law--by refusing to reinstate him after three juries said he did not use excessive force in the beating of Rodney G. King. Briseno, one of six officers who escaped punitive damages this week in King's civil case, has been on unpaid leave since eight days after the March 3, 1991, beating.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unaware that they had been videotaped, Los Angeles police officers and supervisors downplayed the level of violence used to arrest Rodney G. King by claiming that he suffered only cuts and bruises "of a minor nature," according to internal police documents reviewed by The Times. In contrast, three California Highway Patrol officers who watched how the police officers attacked King were so "shocked" at the brutality that they took note of the officers' name tags.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates, testifying Thursday in Rodney G. King's lawsuit against him and other current and former officers, recalled his shock when he first saw the videotape of King's beating. "I realized clearly this was an incident that could be misinterpreted by the public, that this would be a great media event and the department would be in crisis, and these officers would be part of that crisis," Gates said of the incident that toppled him from power.
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