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Ted Bundy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | ROBERT GEHRKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The patrol car's headlights drowned the Volkswagen Beetle in light, and the officer trained his gun on a shaggy-haired suspect in a black turtleneck. "I didn't want to shoot the guy," said highway patrol Sgt. Bob Hayward. "I wish I had." Hayward didn't know he had collared America's most notorious serial killer. By then, Theodore Bundy had already killed at least 25 young women in four states, preying on good girls from average households.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
The gig: Los Angeles graphologist Andrea McNichol is no stranger to high-profile court cases. As an examiner of questioned documents, she has worked on the murder trials of O.J. Simpson and Ted Bundy and the legal challenge of Howard Hughes' will. Clients of McNichol, the author of "Handwriting Analysis: Putting It to Work for You," include the FBI, other law enforcement agencies and Fortune 500 companies. Baseline: McNichol has used her knowledge of handwriting to assess death threats, debunk hoaxes and expose fraud.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Berberich, 64, a police psychologist who was the first to draw up a profile of serial killer Ted Bundy, died at a hospital in Bellevue, Wash., on Wednesday after apparently suffering a heart attack while playing golf. Bob Keppel, an investigative consultant who once worked for the state attorney general's office in Washington, credited Berberich with doing the first profile on Bundy in 1974.
OPINION
April 7, 2013
Re "Trying to prove their love," Column One, April 4 Your poignant story about Gerardo Herrejon and Ana Verdin-Hernandez - who fell in love when he was 63 and she was 22, but whose marriage is under question by U.S. immigration officials because Ana is an undocumented immigrant - brings to mind one of the most famous romances of the 20th century. After three failed marriages, acclaimed actor Charlie Chaplin met the love of his life - Oona O'Neill, daughter of the playwright Eugene O'Neill - when he was 54 and she was 17. They had eight children and she never married after he died.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court today refused to let Florida authorities execute multiple murderer Ted Bundy for the 1978 slaying of a 12-year-old girl in Lake City, Fla. The court, without any recorded dissent, turned down the state's emergency request aimed at dissolving a federal appeals court order that postponed Bundy's scheduled execution. He was to have died in Florida's electric chair Tuesday morning, but the death warrant for his execution was good through noon today. The U.S.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | United Press International
Theodore Bundy, sentenced to death for strangling two Florida sorority sisters as they slept in 1978, lost a Supreme Court appeal today challenging key testimony used to convict him. The justices rejected Bundy's bid to escape the electric chair for the murders of Margaret Bowman and Lisa Levy at Florida State University's Chi Omega house. Bundy, a law school dropout, argued that testimony from another sorority sister should not have been allowed because she was hypnotized before his trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1989 | JERRY KIRK, Jerry Kirk is the founder and president of the Cincinnati-based National Coalition Against Pornography, an alliance of representatives from more than 70 religious denominations and private organizations
It is tempting to do our best to forget Ted Bundy, but this man and the lessons that his life offers must not be forgotten. Bundy roamed the country on a 20-year trail of premeditated, sadistic violence--a trail marked by rape, mutilation and murder. In a chilling final interview beforehis execution, he discussed at length some of the formative influences in his destructive life. The role of alcohol abuse is not surprising, but the role of hard-core pornography in his life sheds new light.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The FBI on Friday said it will convene a meeting in Quantico, Va., of law enforcement agents from around the country in hopes of clearing up unsolved murders believed to have been committed by Ted Bundy. Terry Green, an FBI major case specialist, declined to say how many would be invited to the meeting, which will take place within three weeks if the schedules of various investigators allow it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer and Mark I. Pinsky is a staff writer for the Orange County Edition of The Times.
By its nature, murder is difficult to comprehend in any rational context. This is especially true of gruesome serial killings. Encountering one charged with that level of violence sitting neat and clean in a well-lighted room makes it even more difficult to envision him committing the brutal and bizarre acts alleged in the indictment.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | From Times wire services
Gov. Bob Martinez signed a new death warrant today for mass murderer Ted Bundy, who lost his bid to have the Supreme Court overturn his death sentence for the slaying of a 12-year-old girl. "Justice has been on hold for a decade," the governor said after Bundy's final appeal was rejected, "and it's about time Ted Bundy paid for his crimes." Bundy, 42, is scheduled to die at 7 a.m.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - John Henry Browne's first brush with the U.S. military was during the Vietnam War. The lanky attorney, then a student who drove a purple hippie van, was rejected for the draft because he was too tall. "I had done research, and I knew if you were over 6 foot 6 you were not qualified to go kill short people," said Browne, who has a 1969 photo of himself in an Uncle Sam hat towering above a sea of fellow antiwar protesters. "So I'd done a bunch of yoga and stretched myself - and I got some help from some Quaker doctors - and I went in with a letter saying I was close to 6-7, which I was at the time.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Ted Bundy was one of the United States' most notorious serial killers. On Friday, his DNA was uploaded into a national database in the hope that the new material will help solve murder cases that have gone cold over the years. Executed in January 1989, Bundy was linked to brutal murders in at least six states before he was captured in Florida after daring escapes elsewhere. He received three death sentences in two separate trials for three known Florida murders, perhaps the most famous of which was that of 12-year-old Kimberly Leach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Msgr. William A. Kerr, 68, a leading human rights figure whom serial killer Ted Bundy sought out to be his spiritual counselor on death row, died May 13 in Tallahassee, Fla. Kerr was hospitalized May 3 after having a stroke as he concluded celebrating a Mass. In 1978, Kerr administered the last rites to a woman Bundy bludgeoned to death in her sorority house near the Florida State University campus. Kerr last spoke with Bundy two days before he was put to death in Florida's electric chair in January 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Berberich, 64, a police psychologist who was the first to draw up a profile of serial killer Ted Bundy, died at a hospital in Bellevue, Wash., on Wednesday after apparently suffering a heart attack while playing golf. Bob Keppel, an investigative consultant who once worked for the state attorney general's office in Washington, credited Berberich with doing the first profile on Bundy in 1974.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | ROBERT GEHRKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The patrol car's headlights drowned the Volkswagen Beetle in light, and the officer trained his gun on a shaggy-haired suspect in a black turtleneck. "I didn't want to shoot the guy," said highway patrol Sgt. Bob Hayward. "I wish I had." Hayward didn't know he had collared America's most notorious serial killer. By then, Theodore Bundy had already killed at least 25 young women in four states, preying on good girls from average households.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998 | JAMES L. ENG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Much of the story of the search for one of the nation's most notorious serial killers can be found in 19 cardboard boxes stored in a warehouse at the King County Archives and Records Center here. Witness reports. Police logs. Suspect files. Tip sheets. Audiotaped interviews. Detectives' notes. Computer lists of Volkswagen owners. Crime-scene and autopsy photographs of young women brutally raped and strangled.
BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | Sarah Caudwell, Sarah Caudwell formerly practiced at the English Bar, and has written three crime novels with a legal setting. She has also written a play, "The Madman's Advocate," about the M'Naghten case
Killing someone is a serious matter--or so, in a civilized society, it is usually believed. Murder, say defenders of the death penalty, is a uniquely terrible crime, which can aptly be requited only by a uniquely terrible punishment. By the same token, however, the existence of that penalty places a uniquely heavy burden on those involved in the process of its exaction--on judges, on juries and not least on the lawyers for both the prosecution and the defense.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
The gig: Los Angeles graphologist Andrea McNichol is no stranger to high-profile court cases. As an examiner of questioned documents, she has worked on the murder trials of O.J. Simpson and Ted Bundy and the legal challenge of Howard Hughes' will. Clients of McNichol, the author of "Handwriting Analysis: Putting It to Work for You," include the FBI, other law enforcement agencies and Fortune 500 companies. Baseline: McNichol has used her knowledge of handwriting to assess death threats, debunk hoaxes and expose fraud.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dispassionate, plodding opening statement laced with crime scene photographs that moved relatives of some victims to near collapse, the prosecution Monday opened its case against accused Riverside County serial killer William L. Suff. Deputy Dist. Atty. Paul Zellerbach likened Suff, 44, to serial killers Jack the Ripper and Ted Bundy, linking the onetime county employee to the deaths of 13 prostitutes over a 2 1/2-year killing rampage that ended in December, 1991.
BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | Sarah Caudwell, Sarah Caudwell formerly practiced at the English Bar, and has written three crime novels with a legal setting. She has also written a play, "The Madman's Advocate," about the M'Naghten case
Killing someone is a serious matter--or so, in a civilized society, it is usually believed. Murder, say defenders of the death penalty, is a uniquely terrible crime, which can aptly be requited only by a uniquely terrible punishment. By the same token, however, the existence of that penalty places a uniquely heavy burden on those involved in the process of its exaction--on judges, on juries and not least on the lawyers for both the prosecution and the defense.
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