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Ted Field

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REAL ESTATE
May 31, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Ted Field, a TV producer and an heir of Chicago department-store magnate Marshall Field, plans to move Monday into the mansion owned for 43 years by silent screen star Harold Lloyd, who died in 1971. By taking occupancy, Field might be putting an end to those rumors that were circulating last November that he planned to sell the 36,000-square-foot home he bought a year ago this month for what many in the community thought was a great deal: $6.5 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
Ted Field, the financier who co-founded Interscope Records and helped turn it into a music industry juggernaut, is stepping down from the company. Field, who started the label from scratch in 1991 with record producer Jimmy Iovine, may concentrate on his film company, sources said. Vivendi's Universal Music acquired a half-stake in the label for $200 million in 1996, buying the rest about two years later and folding the Geffen and A&M labels into it.
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NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton arrives in Beverly Hills tonight for one of his biggest fund-raisers, celebrity guests such as Barbra Streisand and Warren Beatty will turn heads instantly. Not so their host, a bearded, ponytailed man named Frederick W. (Ted) Field. Heir to one of America's great family fortunes and an established movie and music mogul in Hollywood, Field also has quietly become one of the most potent forces in national politics.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS
In a surprising turnaround, Interscope Records President Tom Whalley rejoined the wildly successful Westwood label on Monday, just three days after abruptly leaving with the intention of joining Walt Disney Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Thirty-one Italian Old Master paintings from the collection of entertainment mogul Ted Field will leave Los Angeles and go on the auction block July 5 at Christie's London. The auction house expects sales to total more than $10 million. Field, an heir to the Marshall Field department store fortune in Chicago, is chairman of Interscope Communications, the Los Angeles film and TV production company that has produced such box-office hits as "Three Men and a Baby."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN and CHUCK PHILIPS, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. Chuck Philips writes about pop music for Calendar
Jimmy Iovine, whose credits as a record producer and engineer range from John Lennon to U2, still winces at the humiliation of being turned down by everyone he approached in 1989 to invest in the record company he wanted to start. "People took my calls and they took me to their house for dinner," says the 40-year-old son of a Brooklyn longshoreman. "But I could sense a lot of them thinking, 'He's no record company president . . . he's no David Geffen.'
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even by the standards of the super rich, this was a big art buy. Over a series of years in the 1980s, movie mogul Ted Field invested $19 million in exquisite Italian paintings, which he hung in a sprawling villa he owned in Beverly Hills. Few outside the world's elite art circles knew about the deals. But they did not escape the gaze of California's tax police. The State Board of Equalization now says Field--whose personal wealth is said to top $600 million--owes $2.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
Ted Field, the financier who co-founded Interscope Records and helped turn it into a music industry juggernaut, is stepping down from the company. Field, who started the label from scratch in 1991 with record producer Jimmy Iovine, may concentrate on his film company, sources said. Vivendi's Universal Music acquired a half-stake in the label for $200 million in 1996, buying the rest about two years later and folding the Geffen and A&M labels into it.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS
In a surprising turnaround, Interscope Records President Tom Whalley rejoined the wildly successful Westwood label on Monday, just three days after abruptly leaving with the intention of joining Walt Disney Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of all the dopey movies recently--and there have been a ton of them--"Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey" (citywide) is the best. Perhaps it's because the movie is so unabashed and glowingly open about that dopiness. Like its central characters--a pair of seraphically good-natured and cretinously self-deluded San Dimas teen-agers who pepper their conversation with interjections like "bodacious," "awesome," "egregious," "How's it hanging, dude?"
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER
If it's hard to picture Ted Field schmoozing it up with a Hollywood agent over dinner at Mortons, look again. The normally press-shy, once-elusive music and film impresario says he's now "emerging from the shadows and into the forefront" of his 14-year-old movie company, Interscope Communications, to try to make it as "hip and cool" as his successful record business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995
The State Board of Equalization on Thursday fined movie mogul Ted Field nearly $250,000 for failing to pay taxes on $19 million worth of Italian paintings he purchased for his former Beverly Hills mansion. Field, whose film credits include "Three Men and a Baby," agreed to pay the taxes last month, dropping his fight against the board's efforts to collect the money. Including interest, the total came to about $2.3 million.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even by the standards of the super rich, this was a big art buy. Over a series of years in the 1980s, movie mogul Ted Field invested $19 million in exquisite Italian paintings, which he hung in a sprawling villa he owned in Beverly Hills. Few outside the world's elite art circles knew about the deals. But they did not escape the gaze of California's tax police. The State Board of Equalization now says Field--whose personal wealth is said to top $600 million--owes $2.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN and CHUCK PHILIPS, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. Chuck Philips writes about pop music for Calendar
Jimmy Iovine, whose credits as a record producer and engineer range from John Lennon to U2, still winces at the humiliation of being turned down by everyone he approached in 1989 to invest in the record company he wanted to start. "People took my calls and they took me to their house for dinner," says the 40-year-old son of a Brooklyn longshoreman. "But I could sense a lot of them thinking, 'He's no record company president . . . he's no David Geffen.'
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton arrives in Beverly Hills tonight for one of his biggest fund-raisers, celebrity guests such as Barbra Streisand and Warren Beatty will turn heads instantly. Not so their host, a bearded, ponytailed man named Frederick W. (Ted) Field. Heir to one of America's great family fortunes and an established movie and music mogul in Hollywood, Field also has quietly become one of the most potent forces in national politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of all the dopey movies recently--and there have been a ton of them--"Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey" (citywide) is the best. Perhaps it's because the movie is so unabashed and glowingly open about that dopiness. Like its central characters--a pair of seraphically good-natured and cretinously self-deluded San Dimas teen-agers who pepper their conversation with interjections like "bodacious," "awesome," "egregious," "How's it hanging, dude?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995
The State Board of Equalization on Thursday fined movie mogul Ted Field nearly $250,000 for failing to pay taxes on $19 million worth of Italian paintings he purchased for his former Beverly Hills mansion. Field, whose film credits include "Three Men and a Baby," agreed to pay the taxes last month, dropping his fight against the board's efforts to collect the money. Including interest, the total came to about $2.3 million.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER
If it's hard to picture Ted Field schmoozing it up with a Hollywood agent over dinner at Mortons, look again. The normally press-shy, once-elusive music and film impresario says he's now "emerging from the shadows and into the forefront" of his 14-year-old movie company, Interscope Communications, to try to make it as "hip and cool" as his successful record business.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Thirty-one Italian Old Master paintings from the collection of entertainment mogul Ted Field will leave Los Angeles and go on the auction block July 5 at Christie's London. The auction house expects sales to total more than $10 million. Field, an heir to the Marshall Field department store fortune in Chicago, is chairman of Interscope Communications, the Los Angeles film and TV production company that has produced such box-office hits as "Three Men and a Baby."
REAL ESTATE
May 31, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Ted Field, a TV producer and an heir of Chicago department-store magnate Marshall Field, plans to move Monday into the mansion owned for 43 years by silent screen star Harold Lloyd, who died in 1971. By taking occupancy, Field might be putting an end to those rumors that were circulating last November that he planned to sell the 36,000-square-foot home he bought a year ago this month for what many in the community thought was a great deal: $6.5 million.
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