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August 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
In 1978, as a young, white Southern businessman with strong conservative feelings of alienation about the Democratic Party, F. Borden Hanes Jr. switched his registration to Republican. There was one candidate for the U.S. Senate, in particular, whom Hanes found a politically kindred spirit and for whose reelection campaign Hanes organized a group of other like-minded young men. Hanes recalls that the group raised between $30,000 and $40,000. Their man won. His name: Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
In 1978, as a young, white Southern businessman with strong conservative feelings of alienation about the Democratic Party, F. Borden Hanes Jr. switched his registration to Republican. There was one candidate for the U.S. Senate, in particular, whom Hanes found a politically kindred spirit and for whose reelection campaign Hanes organized a group of other like-minded young men. Hanes recalls that the group raised between $30,000 and $40,000. Their man won. His name: Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
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SPORTS
January 31, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Phil Mickelson rebounded from a lackluster outing at Torrey Pines last week to nearly become the sixth PGA Tour player to card a 59. Unfortunately, as you can see from the video above, his 25-foot birdie putt on his final hole Thursday at the Phoenix Open curled around the lip of the cup and stayed out, leaving him in the lead with a 60. "When it was a foot out, I just couldn't see it missing either way," Mickelson said via a tweet on...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1989 | LORI SILVER and ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writers
The Senate Wednesday, falling to pressure from conservatives, voted to bar the National Endowment for the Arts from funding "obscene artwork" that denigrates the beliefs of a particular religion. Sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), the amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill was approved on a voice vote and sparked little debate. "No artist has a preemptive claim on taxpayer funds" to pay for obscene art, Helms said on the Senate floor. Sen.
SPORTS
July 10, 2012 | Wire reports
Na Yeon Choi survived a triple bogey and a few more shaky moments on the back nine Sunday to win the U.S. Women's Open at Kohler, Wis. It's the first major and sixth LPGA Tour victory for the 24-year-old South Korean star, who came into the tournament ranked fifth in the world. Choi shot a one-over 73 and finished at seven under for a four-stroke victory. Fellow South Korean Amy Yang had a 71 to finish second. They were the only players to finish the tournament under par. Choi went into Sunday with a six-stroke lead after shooting a seven-under 65 on Saturday.
SPORTS
January 19, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from La Quinta -- Camilo Villegas shot a "chill round" of nine-under-par 63 Thursday at the Nicklaus Private Course in the first round of the Humana Challenge. Villegas, a fitness buff who once posed for nude for the ESPN the Magazine body issue, is not shy about flexing his muscles for a female fan. At La Quinta Country Club, David Toms was the other guy in his group, the one wearing an orange shirt and playing with the biggest draw in the field, Phil Mickelson. The galleries that gathered at every hole to cheer for Mickelson actually perked up Toms, who also had a 63 and tied Villegas for the first-round lead.
SPORTS
July 19, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England - Zach Johnson played nearly perfect golf Thursday in the British Open, shared second place with his five-under-par 65, and is assured of a brief mention in the seventh paragraph of most stories on the first round. Several reasons for that. One is that he's from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, giving him a profile about the same as his birthplace. He is Midwest in a game where East, West and South stir the drink. His sport's imagery tends to have a New England hard edge, a California palm tree or a Southern drawl.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his battle to make history in North Carolina, Harvey Gantt draws upon events a continent away, rallying a group of supporters with the power of positive speaking. "You know, when you look at the people in Poland and in Czechoslovakia and you see what they threw off in the course of less than a year, I know that in North Carolina we can throw Jesse Helms off," he tells an enthusiastic crowd of about 200 in the nearby town of Bolivia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The settling of dust after the fractious censorship crisis that gripped the National Endowment for the Arts from early April until a Senate vote Saturday makes clear that politicians and the arts lost on almost every front. It will be a while before results are known of the prolonged focus of media and political attention on artistic freedom of expression--and on the limits to which public funding of the arts may be taken in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A major show of work of the late photographer Robert Mapplethorpe--due to open here July 1--was canceled Tuesday in what apparently is the latest development in an escalating political controversy that has embroiled the National Endowment for the Arts. Cancellation of "Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment" was announced as a second dispute involving the endowment--this one over the endowment's support of a photograph of a crucifix seemingly immersed in urine--has grown in the last few days into a confrontation between the endowment and several conservative senators.
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