Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTed Schmitt
IN THE NEWS

Ted Schmitt

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Schmitt was a great sidewalk schmoozer. The lobby at Schmitt's Cast Theatre was tiny. So Schmitt, who died Thursday from AIDS-related complications, would preside over the sidewalk on opening nights, greeting theatergoers, introducing playwrights to patrons, exchanging information and opinions about what was happening in other theaters around town, talking about life and Hollywood and raising children and, to reporters, constantly pressing for more coverage of Los Angeles theater.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
Reading that the Cast Theatre might be returning to its roots (Theater Notes, May 23) brought me much joy. I was a friend of Ted Schmitt and was lucky enough to have worked with him on David Mamet's "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" in 1980. Without his generosity of spirit and risk-taking elan, the show would never have been possible. Ted nurtured the entire production team as no other producer I've ever known. To him, we were all the Cast. We don't have many legacies in Los Angeles, and the theater community has even fewer.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Schmitt, the personable producer at two of the city's more significant small theaters, who several years ago exchanged a successful business career for a scaled-down life style so he could produce small plays on even smaller budgets, died Thursday of the complications of AIDS. The mover and shaker behind the tiny Cast and Cast-at-the-Circle theaters in Hollywood was 50 when he died at the Medical Center of North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ted Schmitt Memorial: A memorial service for the late Ted Schmitt, the Cast Theatre leader who died May 30, will be held Saturday at 11 a.m. at First Christian Church, 4390 Colfax Ave., North Hollywood. A reception will follow at 1:30 p.m. at the Cast, in Hollywood. A list of organizations to which contributions may be made in Schmitt's memory is available by calling the Cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ted Schmitt Memorial: A memorial service for the late Ted Schmitt, the Cast Theatre leader who died May 30, will be held Saturday at 11 a.m. at First Christian Church, 4390 Colfax Ave., North Hollywood. A reception will follow at 1:30 p.m. at the Cast, in Hollywood. A list of organizations to which contributions may be made in Schmitt's memory is available by calling the Cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1988
From which "cage" does Ted Schmitt ("Theater on a Shoestring," July 10) wish to be freed and from whose incarceration? By his own admission, he and his fellow homosexual citizens are "everywhere . . . even influencing your lives." AMELIA ONTIVEROS Whittier
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
Reading that the Cast Theatre might be returning to its roots (Theater Notes, May 23) brought me much joy. I was a friend of Ted Schmitt and was lucky enough to have worked with him on David Mamet's "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" in 1980. Without his generosity of spirit and risk-taking elan, the show would never have been possible. Ted nurtured the entire production team as no other producer I've ever known. To him, we were all the Cast. We don't have many legacies in Los Angeles, and the theater community has even fewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988
From the point of view of Barbara Isenberg's article, Ted Schmitt's position is laudatory; after all, who can fault his dedication to the theater for such a meager material return? However, as an "artist" in my own right and a loyal theatergoer, I am forced to ask some questions: Where has the press been with comparable front-page coverage of our struggling "little theater" in Los Angeles all these years? And what was the real point of the article? Was the Equity referendum requiring actors to be paid $5 to $14 really the issue?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1985 | DIANA MAR, Mar, a UCLA graduate, was a Times summer intern.
Actor Gregory Harrison recalls the early years of his career when he did nothing but study acting and do Equity Waiver shows. "I would study all day, do plays in the evenings and wash windows from 11 p.m. until 2 a.m. But I could say that I was an actor and mean it because I was working in Waiver. There's not an actor I know who has had to grow up in Hollywood, who hasn't benefitted from it." But good things can turn sour. There have been increasing charges of abuses on the Waiver front.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1988 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Tall, outgoing Ted Schmitt was president of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity at USC. He married his college sweetheart, spent four years in the Navy and earned his MBA at night. He and his wife raised three children in a four-bedroom house near Whittier College, and he had three cars to choose from for his drive to the manufacturing company where he worked in investor relations. He had made what seemed to be the right choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Schmitt was a great sidewalk schmoozer. The lobby at Schmitt's Cast Theatre was tiny. So Schmitt, who died Thursday from AIDS-related complications, would preside over the sidewalk on opening nights, greeting theatergoers, introducing playwrights to patrons, exchanging information and opinions about what was happening in other theaters around town, talking about life and Hollywood and raising children and, to reporters, constantly pressing for more coverage of Los Angeles theater.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Schmitt, the personable producer at two of the city's more significant small theaters, who several years ago exchanged a successful business career for a scaled-down life style so he could produce small plays on even smaller budgets, died Thursday of the complications of AIDS. The mover and shaker behind the tiny Cast and Cast-at-the-Circle theaters in Hollywood was 50 when he died at the Medical Center of North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1988
From which "cage" does Ted Schmitt ("Theater on a Shoestring," July 10) wish to be freed and from whose incarceration? By his own admission, he and his fellow homosexual citizens are "everywhere . . . even influencing your lives." AMELIA ONTIVEROS Whittier
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988
From the point of view of Barbara Isenberg's article, Ted Schmitt's position is laudatory; after all, who can fault his dedication to the theater for such a meager material return? However, as an "artist" in my own right and a loyal theatergoer, I am forced to ask some questions: Where has the press been with comparable front-page coverage of our struggling "little theater" in Los Angeles all these years? And what was the real point of the article? Was the Equity referendum requiring actors to be paid $5 to $14 really the issue?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1988 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Tall, outgoing Ted Schmitt was president of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity at USC. He married his college sweetheart, spent four years in the Navy and earned his MBA at night. He and his wife raised three children in a four-bedroom house near Whittier College, and he had three cars to choose from for his drive to the manufacturing company where he worked in investor relations. He had made what seemed to be the right choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1985 | DIANA MAR, Mar, a UCLA graduate, was a Times summer intern.
Actor Gregory Harrison recalls the early years of his career when he did nothing but study acting and do Equity Waiver shows. "I would study all day, do plays in the evenings and wash windows from 11 p.m. until 2 a.m. But I could say that I was an actor and mean it because I was working in Waiver. There's not an actor I know who has had to grow up in Hollywood, who hasn't benefitted from it." But good things can turn sour. There have been increasing charges of abuses on the Waiver front.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|