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Teddy Kollek

ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | From Reuters
Amos Kollek said his difficult relationship with his famous father, Teddy Kollek, an important figure in Israeli history and long-time mayor of Jerusalem, was the inspiration for his film "Restless." After Thursday's premiere of the drama about the bitter estrangement of a father and his son at the Berlin Film Festival, the Israeli director said he felt cheated out of having a father even though it seemed everyone else envied him. "I had feelings of anger towards my father," the 60-year-old filmmaker said.
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NEWS
November 12, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any day now, one of the best-known mayors in the world will pack his pictures, paperweights and collection of teddy bears and end a 28-year run as one of the great builders of this legendary city. With the results of last week's elections officially announced on Thursday, Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek must now vacate his lived-in office in the Jaffa Road municipality building and march into the pages of history.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mr. Jerusalem" for more than a quarter of a century, Mayor Teddy Kollek is now proving to be "Mr. Indispensable." Kollek, who will be 82 in May, had expected to slip into retirement at the end of last year, advising his successor on how to manage his treasured city but slowing his pace after 60 years of helping to build modern Israel.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | MARCUS ELIASON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Teddy Kollek's pet word for the day was "silly"--mild by the standards of the blunt-talking Jerusalem mayor. A Cabinet minister making his home in the Muslim Quarter: "silly." A pledge by Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir to build yet another Jewish housing project in Arab east Jerusalem: "silly." His own decision to run for mayor 25 years ago: "the silliest." Teddy Kollek will be 80 in May, and is showing no inclination toward imminent retirement.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A secret, first meeting between Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek and Palestinian activist leader Faisal Husseini was disclosed here Friday. The two men held a cordial discussion Monday under the auspices of a Hebrew-language Jerusalem weekly, on condition that the meeting not be made public immediately. Their conversation was published Friday. Both Kollek and Husseini stressed that the conversation was in no way a "negotiation," but both had proposals to make on touchy Israeli-Palestinian issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the late 1950s, when Teddy Kollek took on the challenge of establishing a major art museum in Jerusalem, he might have been whistling in the desert wind. The state of Israel had yet to come of age and Kollek, then director-general of the prime minister's office under David Ben-Gurion, had yet to become mayor of the historic city. Kollek thought his fledgling nation had to have a prestigious showcase for art of high quality and global reach, on par with the best museums in cultural capitals around the world.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's Likud Party gained ground on the once dominant Labor Party in nationwide municipal elections Tuesday, further highlighting a swing by Israel to the political right. Jewish religious parties also made strong showings and helped deny Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek a majority on the City Council for the first time in his 24 years in office. An Arab boycott of the vote also crippled Kollek's "One Jerusalem" council ticket.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Jewish settlers were killed and five others were wounded Monday night in an automatic weapons attack on a civilian bus heading from the West Bank to a rally in Tel Aviv to protest any disbanding of Israeli settlements. The attack came despite the high state of alert observed by the army and the police. Authorities have been expecting possible acts of terrorism during the Middle East peace talks that begin Wednesday in Madrid.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teddy Kollek, the mayor of Jerusalem for 28 years, was defeated for reelection Tuesday by a tough critic of Israel's accord with the Palestine Liberation Organization on Palestinian self-government. Kollek, who had seen the election as a referendum on the peace agreement as well as on his policies of coexistence between Jew and Arab, religious and secular, lost decisively to Ehud Olmert, a leader of the right-wing Likud Party.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old saying that you can't fight City Hall has been turned on its head in this divided and tense capital of religious and political extremes. Teddy Kollek, perhaps the world's best known mayor, is finding that his own City Hall can't fight. Kollek, one of the last grand figures of Zionism, clings to a vision of a united city of disparate groups living in separate but equal communities in mutual respect.
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