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Teen Drinking

NATIONAL
September 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Despite popular ads featuring milk-mustached athletes and rock stars, teenage girls drink less milk as they grow older and instead quench their thirst with sugar-concentrated soda, a study says. A U.S. Agriculture Department study of girls ages 12 through 19 found that the youngest drink the most milk and the least soda. In a survey of 732 girls, 78% of 12-year-olds drank milk, while consuming only nine ounces of soda per day.
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NEWS
December 19, 1993 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a Saturday night party in South Orange County. The music was blaring, teen-age hormones were raging and good old mom was mixing cocktails for the kids. It was an event that Danielle Dragotta, then 15, will never forget. "We thought she (the mom) was so cool," Dragotta recalls. "She was making strawberry margaritas and screwdrivers and drinking right along with us." For Dragotta, the casual drinking evolved into all-night parties and shots of tequila; eventually she had to seek help.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
For those concerned about teens drinking too many sugary beverages, this may be good news: Water, milk and fruit juice are the drinks most likely to be consumed by high school students, not soda. Or so they say.  In a survey last year of high school students, 72% said they drink a glass of water each day, 42% drink at least one glass of milk, and 30% drink fruit juices daily. Only 24% said they drank regular soda (or pop), though when other sugary drinks such as sports drinks, sweetened coffee drinks (ah, yes, those sweetened coffee drinks)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control has accused the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum of multiple violations of its conditional alcohol license during the Electric Daisy Carnival rave last year, including allowing teenagers to consume alcohol. The Coliseum also is accused of allowing consumption and sales of alcohol outside its licensed area, such as the parking lot, during the June 25-26 event. Penalties for a violation of an alcohol license can range from a letter of warning or a fine to suspension or revocation of a license.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Illegal and unseemly as it was, his underage son's bout of falling-down drunkenness in central London drew more sympathy than retribution Friday for Prime Minister Tony Blair--and just when he needed it most. Government squabbling and a controversial policy proposal have rankled many Britons in recent weeks and eroded Blair's popularity.
NEWS
May 25, 1990
South County Safe-Rides, a student-run program sponsored by Capistrano by the Sea Hospital in Dana Point, was recently acknowledged by the Orange County Board of Supervisors for its efforts to reduce teen-age drinking and driving. Launched two years ago, the program provides safe and confidential rides home to fellow students in the Dana Point, Laguna Beach and San Clemente areas who have been drinking or riding with someone who has.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | Interviews conducted by Samantha MacLaren
MARINA BROCKWAY 18, Westwood Not all 18-year-olds are able to handle alcohol. But I don't think the law is necessarily working. It is easy to get alcohol if you are underage. You either know people who are 21 or you tap people on the shoulder in front of a liquor store and ask them to buy for you. When you're 18, you are considered an adult in many regards. At 18, you can join the Army and be given weapons training and the responsibility of protecting your country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000 | NANCY KINSEY NEEDHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parents concerned about their teenagers attending parties where alcohol is served or that are without adult supervision usually have to depend on the trust they place in their children. Promises that such gatherings will be safe are often followed by the words, "But everybody else is allowed to . . . " Now parents facing teens whining this old refrain can stand tough and literally throw the book at them.
HEALTH
December 27, 2004 | Jamie Talan, Newsday
The percentage of teenage girls who drink alcoholic beverages is rising faster than that of boys, and on average, the girls take their first drink at age 13, the American Medical Assn. has reported. In announcing the findings of two surveys, the AMA contended earlier this month that a class of beverages informally known as "alcopops" is partly to blame. The group is warning doctors to educate teenagers about the dangers of such sweet drinks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Corina Knoll
Four days have passed since Aydin Salek died. Tony Veiller, 17, a South Pasadena High School junior, tried to cope with his friend's loss by planning a vigil to honor Salek. Salek died early Sunday, a day before his 18th birthday, after he went to a party where teens were drinking alcohol. The cause of his death is under investigation. On Wednesday evening, hundreds of students, teachers and community members gathered outside the high school gym on Diamond Avenue. They held paper cups with tea lights and votive candles glowing in the night.
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