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March 9, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Relax, TV programmers. The teen viewer isn't going anywhere. The perception of today's teenagers is that of antsy kids bouncing back and forth between their computer screens and cellphones as they update their Facebook statuses and look at videos on Hulu and YouTube while texting their friends. The reality is that for all the time teens spend staring at small screens, it's still the television screen that gets most of their attention. "There is a popularized notion of the typical teenager constantly digitally connected....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | Howard Blume and Teresa Watanabe
On some campuses, there were tears. On others, relief. But frustration was another overriding sentiment at many Southern California high schools Friday, as officials scrambled to pin down whether their students were aboard the ill-fated bus that crashed in flames en route to a college tour. In Los Angeles Unified, Supt. John Deasy said a number of issues complicated efforts to determine which students were on the bus to Humboldt State. A day after the fiery crash, district officials still had not accounted for all 19 students from 16 high schools who took the trip.
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AUTOS
March 29, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
As a parent, you could assume that your teens have taken all of your lectures about the ills of distracted driving to heart. Or you could turn to a growing number of apps designed to let you know exactly what your teens are doing behind the wheel. Canary (for iPhone and Android) is one. It is installed on a teen's phone, and parents will be alerted whenever their sons and daughters are texting, tweeting or using Facebook while they are driving. Canary can also be set to send an alert when a designated maximum speed is exceeded.
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A word of a warning to parents of adolescents, from the nation's poison centers: Yes, you've secured your medicine chest and your liquor cabinet; but a new thrill-seeking activity among teens might make you consider locking away the cinnamon shaker as well. In the first three months of 2012, the nation's poison centers have had 139 calls -- close to three times as many as were received in all of 2011 -- seeking help and information about the intentional misuse of cinnamon. At least 122 of those calls arose from something called the "cinnamon challenge" -- a game growing in popularity among teens in which a child is dared to swallow a spoonful of ground or powdered cinnamon without drinking any water.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Substance-abuse education and screening should be a part of almost every visit between a doctor and an adolescent, the nation's leading pediatricians said Monday. In a statement published in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics , members of the American Academy of Pediatrics said doctors can use a variety of screening tools to inquire into a teen's use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The statement argues that no level of experimentation with drugs is safe.
SCIENCE
August 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers aren't necessarily tuning out adults; they simply might not be able to hear them. The proportion of teens in the United States with slight hearing loss has increased 30% in the last 15 years, and the number with mild or worse hearing loss has increased 77%, researchers said Tuesday. One in every five teens now has at least a slight hearing loss, which can affect learning, speech perception, social skills development and self-image; one in every 20 has a more severe loss.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Questions on the impact of medical marijuana laws on teenagers' illicit use of the drug have been raised repeatedly by public health officials. One study suggests that allowing marijuana to be sold for medical purposes doesn't harm teens. Researchers compared teens in Rhode Island, where medical marijuana was legalized in 2006, with adolescents in Massachusetts, which doesn't allow medical marijuana sales. The analysis included 32,570 teens who completed surveys on drug use between 1997 and 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Amber Medina has been looking for a job for five months, ever since her father, a metal-worker, was laid off and her mom began struggling to support the family of seven on her $15-per-hour job. But the 17-year-old has yet to find anything permanent, despite sending out resumes and visiting dozens of potential employers, including the clothing stores Old Navy and PacSun. "I'm looking for any job to help my parents," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
The cellphone video from inside a classroom at Santa Monica High School went viral late last week. It showed Mark Black, a longtime teacher and wrestling coach, swatting at a student with his arms, grabbing the teenager by the thigh and then crashing into desks and the classroom wall as he tried to execute a takedown. Moments later, Black had the young man pinned to the ground. District Superintendent Sandra Lyon called the incident "utterly alarming" and acted swiftly, placing the teacher on leave pending the outcome of an investigation.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
TUNICA, Miss. - Marie Barnard was delighted when, after decades of silence on the topic, Mississippi passed a law requiring school districts to teach sex education. But the lesson involving the Peppermint Pattie wasn't what she had in mind for her sons. The curricula adopted by the school district in Oxford called on students to unwrap a piece of chocolate, pass it around class and observe how dirty it became. "They're using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she's had sex - that she's been used," said Barnard, who works in public health.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Any parent with teenagers can tell you how tough it is to keep abreast of their fashion whims. Even more difficult: doing it for a living and making a profit at it. Tilly's Inc. of Irvine is a specialty retailer that targets teens and young adults with action sports clothing, shoes and accessories. Tilly's says on its website that it "offers one of the largest assortments of brands and merchandise from the top players in the surf, skate, motocross and lifestyle apparel industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
An LAPD officer who allegedly beat a teenage relative over poor grades and behavior was charged in Orange County this week with felony child abuse and corporal injury. Prosecutors say Daniel Hun Chun, 39, was off duty March 13 when he allegedly confronted the teenager over poor grades and other behavior issues. Chun repeatedly hit the young man “with a variety of household items in the shoulders, back and buttocks,” according to an Orange County district attorney's news release.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- The Federal Trade Commission and California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris say that Facebook is misinterpreting how a children's privacy law applies to teen privacy in a move that could undercut the giant social network in a federal court case in California. Facebook users sued the company for using their images in ads on the service without their consent and later settled the class-action lawsuit in 2012. Children's advocates are challenging the settlement in an effort to require Facebook to get explicit permission from parents before using the personal information - as well as the images, likes and comments - of teens in advertising.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A New Jersey teenager managed to wiggle through a security fence then make his way past a guard to the spire atop 1 World Trade Center, the nation's tallest building, where he took pictures before he was apprehended, officials said Thursday. The boy, who authorities said was being treated as an adult, was charged with misdemeanor criminal trespass in the Sunday morning stunt and faces up to a year in jail if convicted. Officials identified him as Justin Casquejo, 16, of Weehawken, N.J. "We take security and these types of infractions very seriously and will prosecute violators," Joseph Dunne, chief security officer for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the site, said in a statement.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Teens who diet may not be going through a phase -- they could be continuing that behavior into adulthood, a study finds. Researchers followed a group of teens -- 1,030 boys and 1,257 girls -- for 10 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants ranged from early to middle adolescence (about 13 to 16), and at the end they were in their early to mid-adulthood (ages 23 to 26). About half of the girls and one-fourth of the boys said they had dieted in the last year. Those numbers stayed pretty consistent for all girls, but for older boys dieting increased as they got older, going from 21.9% in mid-adolescence to 27.9% in middle young adulthood.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Parents take note: Your teens can now post status updates and photos on Facebook for anyone to see. The giant social network on Wednesday lifted restrictions on kids ages 13 to 17 that kept them from sharing information with people they do not know. Until now, teens' posts on Facebook could be viewed only by friends and the friends of their friends. The move presents a tough new challenge to parents trying to keep their kids safe on social media. Facebook said it was bringing its privacy policy in line with competitors' by giving teens the freedom to decide whether they want to express themselves among a close circle of friends or with a bullhorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From Harry Potter to Bella Swan to Katniss Everdeen, the hottest phenomenon in publishing these days is young adult fiction about risk takers who dare to go their own way. So it's more than a little ironic, if predictable, that films made from these books are completely risk aversive. Why rock the boat and jeopardize a potentially huge franchise if you don't really have to? "Divergent" is the latest, most snug-fitting version of that trend. As directed by Neil Burger ("The Illusionist," "Limitless")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Richard Winton and Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Fourteen teens accused of throwing a clandestine party at an unoccupied La Habra Heights mansion -- and then looting it of everything from  collectible medieval armor to a mounted snow leopard -- are due in court Wedesday to face trespassing and burglary charges. The 9,000-square-foot home sustained more than than $1 million in losses and damage in the November incident, authorities said. Among the looted items were  collectible medieval armor, scuba gear, designer suits and the snow leopard, valued at $250,000.
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