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March 29, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
As a parent, you could assume that your teens have taken all of your lectures about the ills of distracted driving to heart. Or you could turn to a growing number of apps designed to let you know exactly what your teens are doing behind the wheel. Canary (for iPhone and Android) is one. It is installed on a teen's phone, and parents will be alerted whenever their sons and daughters are texting, tweeting or using Facebook while they are driving. Canary can also be set to send an alert when a designated maximum speed is exceeded.
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NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A 16-year-old boy refused to drop the knives he was using in a slashing attack at a Pennsylvania school and told a school official that he had “more people to kill,” according to a police affidavit released Friday. Alex Hribal was arraigned Friday on 21 counts of attempted homicide and 21 counts of aggravated assault in the April 9 attack at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Pa., about 20 miles from Pittsburgh. Hribal, who remains in custody, was originally charged with four counts of attempted homicide and 21 counts of aggravated assault.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2009 | Seema Mehta
Amber Medina has been looking for a job for five months, ever since her father, a metal-worker, was laid off and her mom began struggling to support the family of seven on her $15-per-hour job. But the 17-year-old has yet to find anything permanent, despite sending out resumes and visiting dozens of potential employers, including the clothing stores Old Navy and PacSun. "I'm looking for any job to help my parents," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
A 14-year-old boy wanted on suspicion of torturing and attempting to kill an 87-year-old woman as she slept in a retirement home in Hemet has been arrested, police said. Raymond Michael Miranda was tracked to Temecula on Thursday evening and brought back to Hemet, where he was booked into the city jail, Hemet police said in a statement. Officials said took the unusual step of releasing the boy's photo and identity Thursday "due to the serious nature of the case" and the need for the public's help in tracking the homeless teen down.
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A word of a warning to parents of adolescents, from the nation's poison centers: Yes, you've secured your medicine chest and your liquor cabinet; but a new thrill-seeking activity among teens might make you consider locking away the cinnamon shaker as well. In the first three months of 2012, the nation's poison centers have had 139 calls -- close to three times as many as were received in all of 2011 -- seeking help and information about the intentional misuse of cinnamon. At least 122 of those calls arose from something called the "cinnamon challenge" -- a game growing in popularity among teens in which a child is dared to swallow a spoonful of ground or powdered cinnamon without drinking any water.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Relax, TV programmers. The teen viewer isn't going anywhere. The perception of today's teenagers is that of antsy kids bouncing back and forth between their computer screens and cellphones as they update their Facebook statuses and look at videos on Hulu and YouTube while texting their friends. The reality is that for all the time teens spend staring at small screens, it's still the television screen that gets most of their attention. "There is a popularized notion of the typical teenager constantly digitally connected....
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Dog ownership appears to make teens more active, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Virginia. They surveyed 618 pairs of adolescents and their parents living in the Minneapolis area about the number of dogs in the home and how much time they spent physically active. About half of the teens also wore accelerometers -- devices that measure activity -- for one week. The teens in dog-owning families logged about 15 additional minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity per week after the researchers controlled for factors such as gender and socioeconomic status.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Questions on the impact of medical marijuana laws on teenagers' illicit use of the drug have been raised repeatedly by public health officials. One study suggests that allowing marijuana to be sold for medical purposes doesn't harm teens. Researchers compared teens in Rhode Island, where medical marijuana was legalized in 2006, with adolescents in Massachusetts, which doesn't allow medical marijuana sales. The analysis included 32,570 teens who completed surveys on drug use between 1997 and 2009.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Substance-abuse education and screening should be a part of almost every visit between a doctor and an adolescent, the nation's leading pediatricians said Monday. In a statement published in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics , members of the American Academy of Pediatrics said doctors can use a variety of screening tools to inquire into a teen's use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The statement argues that no level of experimentation with drugs is safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Nicole Teeny's first feature-length documentary unveils a little-known subculture, one that combines the Good Book with good old-fashioned competitiveness. But the National Bible Quiz Championship, with its teams of Scripture-spouting teens, isn't the main event in "Bible Quiz. " A smart, funny and disarming 17-year-old girl is the heart of this low-key charmer of a coming-of-age story. The intimate film, a prize winner at the Slamdance Film Festival, revolves around the experience of Mikayla Irle, a tomboyish 12th-grader with family troubles who finds a sense of belonging on a Bible Quiz team in Tacoma, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
The father of a 15-year-old boy who stowed away in the wheel-well of a Hawaii-bound plane "thanked God" his son survived the ordeal, saying the boy may have been trying to return to Africa, according to the Voice of America . “When I watched the analysis about the extraordinary and dangerous trip of my son on local TVs and that Allah had saved him, I thanked God and I was very happy,” Abdilahi Yusuf Abdi, of Santa Clara, told VOA's Somali...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Kate Mather, Brian Bennett and Joseph Serna
The teen stowaway who survived a flight from San Jose to Hawaii in a wheel well of a jet is recovering and could be reunited with his family soon. The boy spent Tuesday "resting comfortably" in a Hawaii hospital, said Kayla Rosenfeld of the state's Department of Human Services. Officials with child welfare services, which now has custody of the teen, are making arrangements to send him home, she said. Santa Clara Unified School District spokeswoman Jennifer Dericco confirmed the teenager was a high school student in the district, but declined to say where, citing privacy concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Kate Mather
Images of footprints and handprints inside the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 jetliner appear to bolster the fantastic story of a Santa Clara teenager who reportedly survived a frigid, perilous journey cooped up inside as a stowaway. The images, including of a footprint on the tire below the wheel well, were taken by Hawaii News Now,  and appear to support the boy's story of surviving the 5-1/2 hour flight from San Jose while enduring sub-zero temperatures and deathly thin air. Authorities said it was a miracle the 15-year-old boy survived in the wheel well, as oxygen was limited at the jet's cruising altitude of 38,000 feet, and the temperature could have dropped to 50 degrees below zero or lower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Brian Bennett, Kate Mather and Joseph Serna
Security experts say it's important to thoroughly trace what transpired over the approximately six-hour period that a 15-year-old apparently went undetected at Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport  before stowing away in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jetliner traveling to Maui. According to a federal law enforcement source who spoke to The Times on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the case, a security camera at the airport recorded video of a person coming over a perimeter fence at the airport just after 1 a.m. Sunday.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A U.S. soldier faces a preliminary hearing on Wednesday on charges he unlawfully killed two unarmed teenagers in an Iraqi battle zone. Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera has been charged with several counts, including premeditated murder, and faces a mandatory life sentence if convicted of the killings. The preliminary hearing, known in military parlance as an Article 32 proceeding, is being held at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. The Army has been reluctant to comment on the case, which was pushed into the limelight in 2012 by an investigative report by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review in which soldiers who served with Barbera said they were troubled that no legal action had been taken after the shootings.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Teens who diet may not be going through a phase -- they could be continuing that behavior into adulthood, a study finds. Researchers followed a group of teens -- 1,030 boys and 1,257 girls -- for 10 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants ranged from early to middle adolescence (about 13 to 16), and at the end they were in their early to mid-adulthood (ages 23 to 26). About half of the girls and one-fourth of the boys said they had dieted in the last year. Those numbers stayed pretty consistent for all girls, but for older boys dieting increased as they got older, going from 21.9% in mid-adolescence to 27.9% in middle young adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Readers of young adult fiction have more choices than ever before. Still, just as adults are "reading down," many teens are also "reading up. " What does that mean? Some teens are turning to titles intended for adults that feature young protagonists. Stormdancer By Jay Kristoff Thomas Dunne Books, 336 pp.: $24.99 The kickoff to a new fantasy series is dystopian steam punk set in feudal Japan with a strong female lead. (September) The Yellow Birds By Kevin Powers Little, Brown, 240 pp.: $24.99 Two young American soldiers struggle to protect each other from insurgents, fatigue and other perils of the Iraq War. (September)
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Two weeks after federal officials criticized its aggressive use of force, the Albuquerque Police Department tried but failed to retrieve video from the on-body camera of an officer who two days ago shot to death a woman suspected of stealing a car. Police Chief Gorden Eden Jr. told reporters at a televised briefing Wednesday that the department has faced similar issues with the small body-mounted cameras and that this officer's device has been...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Authorities are investigating if any more security video exists showing a teenager who bypassed security at a San Jose airport and stowed away in the wheel well of a Hawaii-bound jetliner. In a statement Monday, airport officials said they have video of the 15-year-old walking on the airport tarmac toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 on Sunday, but it remains unclear how the teen got onto the tarmac. The   FBI   originally said video showed him scaling a fence. But late Monday, airport officials only mentioned a video that showed him walking on the tarmac.
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