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SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Teenagers in America report they are just as stressed out as adults, according to a new study by the American Psychological Assn. And during the school year, many teens report even higher stress levels than adults. In an online survey of 1,018 teens and 1,950 adults conducted in August, the average stress level reported by teens during the school year was 5.8 on a 10-point scale where 1 is least stressed and 10 is most stressed. Adults reported an average stress level of 5.1.  Teens were a bit more relaxed in the summer, though, when their reported stress level fell to 4.1. "We assumed that teens experience stress, but what was surprising was that it was so high compared to adults," said Norman Anderson, chief executive of the APA. "In adulthood there are work pressures, family pressures and economic pressures, but adolescents still reported higher levels of stress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
It's not easy growing up gay in America, despite the nation's increasing acceptance of same-sex marriage and other issues of gay equality. Gay and lesbian teenagers across the United States are less likely to be happy, more likely to report harassment and more inclined to experiment with drugs and alcohol than the nation's straight teens, according to a new nationwide survey of more than 10,000 gay and lesbian young people. The survey , which will be released Thursday by the Human Rights Campaign, aWashington, D.C.-based civil rights group, is described as one of the largest ever to focus on the nation's gay youth.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Mom and Dad, when your teen says, "But everybody's doing it," they're actually telling the truth -- not that that should sway you. Digital communications are an integral part of daily life for an overwhelming majority of American teens, according to findings from Common Sense Media. Indeed, when it comes to networking online, 90 percent of 13- to 17-year-olds have tried some form of social media, with the majority of them hanging out on Facebook, the survey reports.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
What does it matter if you were cute in high school? More than you might think. A new study undertaken by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Texas at Austin finds that teens rated as good-looking in high school got higher grades and were ultimately more likely to graduate college and get bigger paychecks as adults. Well into adulthood, “people's personal appearance has powerful effects on their life chances,” sociologists Rachel A. Gordon and Robert Crosnoe wrote in a briefing paper prepared for the Council on Contemporary Families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Four teens could face attempted murder charges after police said they chased a man down in Huntington Beach and almost beat him to death with their skateboards. The victim, whose identity was not released, was rushed to UCI Medical Center's trauma center, where he underwent emergency surgery, KTLA reported . Police said the four teens, whose genders were not immediately available, were booked on suspicion of attempted murder. Two groups of teenagers began fighting about 7:50 p.m. Friday at Murdy Park in Huntington Beach, according to KTLA-TV . During the fight, a woman tried to break it up and was attacked.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
Teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome may push themselves too hard, which contributes to ongoing fatigue, claim the authors of a new study.   Researchers followed 301 adolescents with mononucleosis, which often precedes chronic fatigue syndrome in teens. They diagnosed 39 teens with chronic fatigue syndrome six months after the mononucleosis diagnosis. That group of adolescents was compared with 39 of the youths who had mononucleosis but who had recovered fully after six months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The last issue of L.A. Youth has gone to press. The newspaper produced by teenagers for teenagers survived for 25 years in city schools but now has reached the end of its run. "It's over," said Donna Myrow, L.A. Youth's executive director, who started the newspaper with students working at her kitchen table. Over the years, it grew to have an office of its own, where students would come to produce a newspaper that was distributed to the classrooms of more than 1,200 teachers across Los Angeles County.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Authorities released new details Monday about two teenage boys who are charged with the murder of Delbert Belton, an 88-year-old World War II veteran, in Spokane, Wash., saying the motive of the attack was robbery, and that family members helped lead police to their second suspect. Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub, at a news conference Monday that was streamed live online, said suspects Demetrius Glenn and Kenan Adams-Kinard, both 16, have been charged with first-degree murder and first-degree robbery.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People who volunteer are often known to say they get more out of the experience than those who are being helped. A study in Canada concurs that that may be true: Researchers say that high school students who volunteered improved their own health. The researchers recruited and assessed 106 10 th graders from western Canada. Half were assigned to volunteer weekly with elementary school children for two months. At the end of that time, the high school students showed significantly lower markers for cardiovascular disease risk, including body mass index and cholesterol levels when compared with students in a control group.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A new study has found a link between teenage sexual activity and "sexting" -- using cellphone devices to send sexually suggestive or explicit messages and photos. In short, teens who "sext" are seven times more likely to have sex.  The study polled more than 1,800 Los Angeles high school-age students. Of those polled, 15% acknowledged sexting, and 54% reported knowing someone who had sent a sext. Why is that second figure relevant? Because the study found that "knowing someone who sexted was strongly associated with an individual's own sexting behavior.
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