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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Was it Superman's, Spider-Man's or Socrates' uncle who said, "With great power comes great responsibility?" Regardless, it would have proved sound advice for the suddenly telekinetic teens at the center of the raw, electrical charge of "Chronicle. " Thankfully, it's wisdom the filmmakers took to heart. This mind-and-fork-bending sci-fi saga comes from the freaky imaginations of director Josh Trank and screenwriter Max Landis, who've packed their feature debut with smartness. Don't let its DIY sensibility fool you: "Chronicle" is ultimately telling a meta-story, built around the age-old conundrum - if you had superpowers that would let you do just about anything, would you do good or evil?
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Relax, TV programmers. The teen viewer isn't going anywhere. The perception of today's teenagers is that of antsy kids bouncing back and forth between their computer screens and cellphones as they update their Facebook statuses and look at videos on Hulu and YouTube while texting their friends. The reality is that for all the time teens spend staring at small screens, it's still the television screen that gets most of their attention. "There is a popularized notion of the typical teenager constantly digitally connected....
SCIENCE
November 26, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Doctors should give underage teenagers prescriptions for emergency contraceptives like Plan B before they start having sex instead of waiting until a young patient's "plan A" goes awry, the American Academy of Pediatrics says in a new policy statement. It says doctors should also counsel teens on the various options for emergency birth control as part of an overall strategy to reduce teen pregnancy. The academy is issuing the new position paper, published online Monday by the journal Pediatrics, as physicians and other health experts struggle to reduce the nation's high birthrate among adolescents.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2009 | Associated Press
Nearly 15% of teenagers think they are going to die young, leading many to drug use, suicide attempts and other unsafe behavior, new research suggests. The study, based on a survey of more than 20,000 young people, challenges conventional wisdom that says teens engage in risky behavior because they think they are invulnerable to harm. Instead, a sizable number of teens may take chances "because they feel hopeless and figure that not much is at stake," said study author Dr.
SCIENCE
August 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers aren't necessarily tuning out adults; they simply might not be able to hear them. The proportion of teens in the United States with slight hearing loss has increased 30% in the last 15 years, and the number with mild or worse hearing loss has increased 77%, researchers said Tuesday. One in every five teens now has at least a slight hearing loss, which can affect learning, speech perception, social skills development and self-image; one in every 20 has a more severe loss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
It's not easy growing up gay in America, despite the nation's increasing acceptance of same-sex marriage and other issues of gay equality. Gay and lesbian teenagers across the United States are less likely to be happy, more likely to report harassment and more inclined to experiment with drugs and alcohol than the nation's straight teens, according to a new nationwide survey of more than 10,000 gay and lesbian young people. The survey , which will be released Thursday by the Human Rights Campaign, aWashington, D.C.-based civil rights group, is described as one of the largest ever to focus on the nation's gay youth.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Cutting, burning and other forms of self-harm behaviors occur in 8% of all teenagers, according to a study released Thursday. While common, however, the study suggests that the practice of self-harm typically vanishes in late adolescence -- often without any mental-health treatment. That doesn't mean, however, that parents should ignore the behavior, say the authors of the study, published Wednesday in the Lancet . Many youths who cut or burn themselves have underlying mental-health problems, such as depression or anxiety, that commonly persist into adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"... I can't shop there I'm overweight, have to say it like it's a curse word. Only the skinny can joke about how fat they are because they know how much they aren't; all they want are the compliments. I know I won't get compliments... " ? Amy Hunt, 16 Teenage girls used to keep their secrets ? those they dared to record ? locked away in diaries. These days, many express their most intimate thoughts on paper or in cyberspace, often rendered in language surprisingly (to adults, at least)
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook is lifting restrictions on teens to let them share more information publicly in a bid to regain the popularity it has lost to Twitter, Snapchat and other social networks. Teens ages 13 to 17 used to be able to only share information with friends or friends of friends. Now Facebook is giving them more control over what information they share publicly. "Teens," the company said in a blog post, "want to be heard. " With the new policy, teens' privacy settings will automatically only share information with friends but they will have the ability to change those settings.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- More American teens than ever are using smartphones as their main onramp to the Internet. A new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that far more teens are using smartphones to access the Internet than adults. About 37% of Americans ages 12 to 17 go on to the Internet from a smartphone, up sharply in just one year, according to the 2012 Pew survey. Twenty-three percent of teens mostly go online using their phones and not a desktop or laptop computer, compared with 15% of adults, the survey found.
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