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NEWS
September 9, 2010
Teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome may push themselves too hard, which contributes to ongoing fatigue, claim the authors of a new study.   Researchers followed 301 adolescents with mononucleosis, which often precedes chronic fatigue syndrome in teens. They diagnosed 39 teens with chronic fatigue syndrome six months after the mononucleosis diagnosis. That group of adolescents was compared with 39 of the youths who had mononucleosis but who had recovered fully after six months.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
It's not easy growing up gay in America, despite the nation's increasing acceptance of same-sex marriage and other issues of gay equality. Gay and lesbian teenagers across the United States are less likely to be happy, more likely to report harassment and more inclined to experiment with drugs and alcohol than the nation's straight teens, according to a new nationwide survey of more than 10,000 gay and lesbian young people. The survey , which will be released Thursday by the Human Rights Campaign, aWashington, D.C.-based civil rights group, is described as one of the largest ever to focus on the nation's gay youth.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People who volunteer are often known to say they get more out of the experience than those who are being helped. A study in Canada concurs that that may be true: Researchers say that high school students who volunteered improved their own health. The researchers recruited and assessed 106 10 th graders from western Canada. Half were assigned to volunteer weekly with elementary school children for two months. At the end of that time, the high school students showed significantly lower markers for cardiovascular disease risk, including body mass index and cholesterol levels when compared with students in a control group.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Taylor Swift has finally weighed in on whether she considers herself a role model for impressionable young people. And the verdict is ... she accepts! In an interview to be broadcast this Sunday on "60 Minutes," the singer said she believes she can be an influence among some fans, and she's OK with that. But how influential are celebs when it comes to health-related issues such as drugs, alcohol, smoking and weight? Studies show that teens' habits and choices may be affected by famous people they admire, but they're not the only ones who hold sway.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A new study has found a link between teenage sexual activity and "sexting" -- using cellphone devices to send sexually suggestive or explicit messages and photos. In short, teens who "sext" are seven times more likely to have sex.  The study polled more than 1,800 Los Angeles high school-age students. Of those polled, 15% acknowledged sexting, and 54% reported knowing someone who had sent a sext. Why is that second figure relevant? Because the study found that "knowing someone who sexted was strongly associated with an individual's own sexting behavior.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Facebook is lifting restrictions on teens to let them share more information publicly in a bid to regain the popularity it has lost to Twitter, Snapchat and other social networks. Teens ages 13 to 17 used to be able to only share information with friends or friends of friends. Now Facebook is giving them more control over what information they share publicly. "Teens," the company said in a blog post, "want to be heard. " With the new policy, teens' privacy settings will automatically only share information with friends but they will have the ability to change those settings.
AUTOS
March 15, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Given a choice between a new Toyota Corolla or the latest iPhone, 16-year-old Allison Katz of Irvine says that's an easy one. She'd take the phone. Texting drives her social life. She doesn't have a driver's license and hasn't rushed to get one. "I mostly stay near my house except for soccer practice, and then Mom or Dad drives," Allison said. It's enough to keep an auto executive awake at night. Thirty years ago, nearly half of 16-year-olds had a driver's license, their passport to independence.
HEALTH
April 6, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
Two weeks ago, a federal judge ordered the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to allow 17-year-olds to buy the emergency contraceptive pill Plan B without a prescription and to consider allowing such purchases by younger girls as well. Previously, the agency had set 18 as the cutoff age, meaning younger girls had to consult a doctor to get the pill. The FDA is reviewing the court's decision, spokeswoman Rita Chappelle says.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- More American teens than ever are using smartphones as their main onramp to the Internet. A new report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project found that far more teens are using smartphones to access the Internet than adults. About 37% of Americans ages 12 to 17 go on to the Internet from a smartphone, up sharply in just one year, according to the 2012 Pew survey. Twenty-three percent of teens mostly go online using their phones and not a desktop or laptop computer, compared with 15% of adults, the survey found.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2009 | Associated Press
Nearly 15% of teenagers think they are going to die young, leading many to drug use, suicide attempts and other unsafe behavior, new research suggests. The study, based on a survey of more than 20,000 young people, challenges conventional wisdom that says teens engage in risky behavior because they think they are invulnerable to harm. Instead, a sizable number of teens may take chances "because they feel hopeless and figure that not much is at stake," said study author Dr.
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