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Telecommunications Industry

BUSINESS
April 2, 1996 | LESLIE HELM and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
SBC Communications Corp.'s announcement Monday of its plans to acquire Pacific Telesis Group is just the largest in a series of mergers and realignments that are dramatically changing the competitive landscape of the nation's telecommunications industry. "Everyone is positioning themselves to be the new model of an integrated, one-stop service provider," said Bryan Van Dussen, director of telecommunications research at Yankee Group, a Boston-based market research company.
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BUSINESS
December 14, 1987
Frank J. Feitz began a recent interview in his Irvine office by taking two telephone calls. Somehow, the interruption seemed appropriate for a businessman who has spent more than 20 years in the telecommunications industry. Feitz is chairman of ABI American Businessphones, a company that sells telephone systems to small and medium-size businesses. Feitz founded the company in 1982 and has led it on a fast-track expansion. The firm's annual sales have soared from $726,000 in 1982 to $27.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
For the last few weeks I've been wondering whether I've been deeply unfair to the nation's phone and wireless companies. You see, I've been assuming that the only reason we couldn't keep our old cellphone numbers when switching to new carriers was that the companies had obstructed the practice over fears that it would encourage customers to seek out better deals from competitors.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2002 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In today's brutally humbled telecommunications industry, it's all about the basics. Upstarts with brash-talking executives are out. Conquering the world is out. And chief executives these days can forget about rapid expansion, frenzied acquisitions and highflying stock prices. In times like these, it's good to be Verizon Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Europe's telecommunications titans continue to struggle with the continent's steep downturn, with two reporting steep losses Tuesday while two others saw their credit ratings cut. London-based Vodafone Group, Europe's largest mobile phone company, said its fiscal first-half loss more than doubled to $14 billion as it wrote down the value of acquisitions from a spending spree.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Until 1984, people like Mary Quintana and Laer Pearce rarely thought about their telephone service. There was one company -- AT&T Corp. -- and it charged one basic price for local calls. Long-distance service cost extra and was too expensive not to watch the clock while talking. Then a federal court mandate turned the telecommunications industry upside down, and millions of Americans suddenly had to start paying attention.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, the wireless industry has heralded the promise of third-generation technology and the coming of do-it-all phones with high-speed Internet connections and streaming video. Now, however, the mobile companies are changing their tune. Battered by low stock prices, slowing phone sales and the prospect of investing billions of dollars on new radio spectrum and networks, many companies say the shift to so-called 3G high-speed cellular networks isn't so urgent after all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council is expected to weigh in today on one of the most controversial aspects of cable TV, and it isn't even about television. It is about the Internet, and who will control its delivery at high speeds to hundreds of thousands of households in Los Angeles over cable television lines.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With new FCC Chairman Michael Powell throttling back his agency's past activism, the telecommunications battleground is likely to shift to Congress and the states. In his first news conference since President Bush named him chairman of the Federal Communications Commission last month, Powell spelled out his belief this week that the marketplace, rather than federal bureaucrats, should set the terms of telecommunications competition.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
Qwest Communications International Inc. and union representatives headed back to the bargaining table Monday afternoon after a day in which little progress was reported in reaching a new contract for nearly 25,000 employees. The employees across a 13-state region remained on the job two days after their contract with the telephone provider expired, hoping to avoid a strike.
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