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Telecommuting

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
Some important information was not mentioned in your recent story on telecommuting ("Clean Air Plans Call on Telecommuting" July 2). I was quoted in the story as saying that some managers resist telecommuting because they fear they will lose control over the performance of their employees. The story didn't mention that this resistance can be overcome fairly easily by training managers to manage what employees produce, rather than the effort they seem to put into their work. The story said that few employers are aware of telecommuting, but this isn't true in Orange County.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A second strike by Bay Area rapid transit workers in four months produced traffic jams and frustration Friday, but officials predicted the worst was yet to come. Transportation officials said they believed many commuters took the day off or telecommuted, relieving the crush to get in and out of San Francisco and around the East Bay. BART, the nation's fifth-largest transit system, normally carries 400,000 round-trip passengers each workday. On Friday, the first day of the strike, traffic increased only 8% and car pools by 25%, according to an afternoon count by transportation officials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2001
Re "Companies Turning Cool to Telecommuting Trend," Dec. 28: Most middle managers and supervisors are workers who are unable to act as individual contributors; thus, their reason for being is to "monitor the productivity of their workers." I have telecommuted for almost three years, and my productivity has never been higher. Nobody stops by my desk to repeatedly ask me for "status." Nobody stops by to rehash the game last night. Nobody drops by to see if there is any way that I could do their job for them.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Despite recent moves by Yahoo Inc. and Best Buy to end work-from-home arrangements, telecommuters need not fret. Most firms have no plans to end the flexible work policies, a survey found. A poll of 120 human resources executives by Challengers, Gray & Christmas Inc., a global outplacement and executive coaching firm, found that 97% of those who responded -- about 80% -- said they had no plans to eliminate telecommuting. "When major companies like Yahoo and Best Buy make notable policy changes, there is no doubt that other employers will take notice and some may even reevaluate their policies," said John A. Challenger, chief executive of the firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989
Los Angeles County officials Wednesday unveiled details of their first full-scale "telecommuting" project, which they hope will eventually enable thousands of county employees to work at home on computers. Supervisor Mike Antonovich and Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon said at a press conference that about 200 volunteers will be working at home by August, and officials expect 2,000 of the county's 17,000 downtown employees to be telecommuting in the next five years. The concept is part of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's master plan to help alleviate smog by reducing traffic in the region.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN
Seven hundred thousand workers in the Southland are putting technology to work for them--at home. They are telecommuters, and they spend at least one day a week working from home or a nearby tele-center equipped with all the comforts of the workplace. According to figures released this month by the Southern California Telecommuting Partnership, the number of telecommuters has increased 11% since last fall. The reason is technology.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1991 | TIMOTHY H. WILLARD, TIMOTHY H. WILLARD is managing editor of the Futurist, a publication of the World Future Society in Bethesda, Md
Telecommuting is typically seen as being high-tech, computer-oriented, home-based and full time. But that won't necessarily be the case in the future. None of these features are essential to telecommuting, says Patricia Mokhtarian of UC Davis, who has spent six years administering and evaluation telecommuting pilot programs. "Telecommunications technology may be no more sophisticated than the telephone," she says.
REAL ESTATE
September 11, 2005 | From Times wire reports
The rise in telecommuting has led to home offices becoming the most popular special-function room that architects are being asked to design, according to the American Institute of Architects' Home Design Trends Survey for the second quarter of 2005. Low-maintenance materials and more storage space are also increasingly sought. Meanwhile, consumer demand for exercise rooms appears to have peaked in many markets. Upscale entryways and defined hallways are becoming less popular.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Working from home may be the nation's fastest-growing employment trend. Already more than 25 million Americans work from home at least part time, and the numbers continue to swell each year. Some believe that the growth will only accelerate with the current baby boom and the growth of more flexible employment practices. But "telecommuters" often confront problems they'd never have in the office.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2009 | Michael S. Rosenwald, Rosenwald writes for the Washington Post.
Frank Gruber's workstation at AOL in Dulles, Va., could be in any cubicle farm from here to Bangalore -- pushpin board for reminders, computer on Formica desk, stifling fluorescent lighting. It's so drab, there's nothing more to say about it, which is why the odds of finding Gruber there are slim. Instead, Gruber often works at the Tryst coffeehouse in the Adams Morgan neighborhood here, at Liberty Tavern in nearby suburban Clarendon, Va.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Electronics retailer Best Buy is calling its workers back into the office, shutting down its experiment with flexible workplace hours a week after Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer put the kibosh on telecommuting at her own company. Best Buy said the roughly 4,000 employees who report to its headquarters in Richfield, Minn., will be asked to do their work at the facility instead of on their own terms. The shift marks the end of an innovative program called Results Only Work Environment, which for the past several years has allowed workers to complete projects out of the office and off the clock.
OPINION
March 3, 2013 | By Nikil Saval
When the first modern office buildings sprung up in America at the end of the 19th century, it was an unquestioned expectation that employees would show up for work there every day. Like the factory workers who came before them, office workers usually clocked in and out, and they sat at their desks - most arranged in highly regimented rows - from morning until early evening, under constant supervision. Even trips to the water cooler were often monitored. With the development of computers and more advanced telecommunications in the 1970s, some employees began to imagine a day when it might be possible to work from home, free from oversight and more in control of their work day. Today, working from home is becoming so common that the idea of making every employee come into the office five days a week seems almost tyrannical.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer stirred up a hornet's nest with her company's announcement that it will soon ban telecommuting . By Yahoo's reckoning, you can't operate at the top of your game if you're working from home. "To become the absolute best place to work, communication and collaboration will be important, so we need to be working side-by-side," Jackie Reses, Yahoo's human resources chief, wrote in a memo to staffers. "That is why it is critical that we are all present in our offices.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Corporate America's most famous working mother has banned her employees from working at home. Now the backlash is threatening to overshadow the progress she has made turning around Yahoo Inc. Marissa Mayer, one of only a handful of women leading Fortune 500 companies, has become the talk of Twitter and Silicon Valley for her controversial move to end telecommuting at the struggling Internet pioneer. VIDEO DISCUSSION: Is Yahoo's telecommuting ban too severe?
BUSINESS
July 16, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Times
The comfort of working at home might have serious drawbacks for telecommuters hoping for the big promotion. A new study from the MIT Sloan Management Review suggests the benefits of being seen at work can dramatically improve your chances of advancement. The study describes two types of "passive face time" that it says heavily influence manager's decisions. "Expected face time" is the typical hours when everyone is seen at work, and "extracurricular face time" is everything outside the normal workday.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Some see telecommuting as a working mother's best friend. After all, having access to the office from home -- whether over the phone or through e-mail -- means Mom can be more flexible, fitting in family duties while also getting the workplace job done.  She can bring home the bacon and fry it up in a pan ... at the same time!   The only problem, a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior reports, is that performing this mighty feat may make her feel guilty.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1997
The number of telecommuters is approaching the number of self-employed Americans who work out of their homes, a survey by a public relations agency found. Creamer Dickson Basford, whose California operations are based in Irvine, said 40% of at-home workers are employed by someone other than themselves. Through a research and consulting subsidiary, Creamer conducted telephone interviews with 500 adults nationwide. It said the margin of error in its study was 6 percentage points.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Some see telecommuting as a working mother's best friend. After all, having access to the office from home -- whether over the phone or through e-mail -- means Mom can be more flexible, fitting in family duties while also getting the workplace job done.  She can bring home the bacon and fry it up in a pan ... at the same time!   The only problem, a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior reports, is that performing this mighty feat may make her feel guilty.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2010 | By Troy Wolverton
Late one July night, Mountain View Fire Capt. Verne Chestnut and his team were checking out a fire alarm at an office building when he saw movement at the front door. But the thing waiting there, as if to greet them, was not a person. It was a robot that looked like a Segway scooter with a head. The robot trailed the crew as they inspected the building and shut off the alarm. Then it spoke to them. "It was just like, 'You're kidding!' " Chestnut said. "It was definitely different being met by a robot.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2009 | Michael S. Rosenwald, Rosenwald writes for the Washington Post.
Frank Gruber's workstation at AOL in Dulles, Va., could be in any cubicle farm from here to Bangalore -- pushpin board for reminders, computer on Formica desk, stifling fluorescent lighting. It's so drab, there's nothing more to say about it, which is why the odds of finding Gruber there are slim. Instead, Gruber often works at the Tryst coffeehouse in the Adams Morgan neighborhood here, at Liberty Tavern in nearby suburban Clarendon, Va.
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