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Telemedicine

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | REPORTER B. NAME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in his swivel chair, facing a computer console, Dr. Robert B. Lufkin goes to work. Lufkin, a radiologist at the UCLA Medical Center, specializes in reading neurological images--"Everything from the neck up"--and the bright screen in front of him has his full attention. On the screen are 24 CAT-scan views of a female patient's head. Lufkin is looking for evidence of cancerous growths.
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HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It sounds futuristic, but telemedicine - the use of telecommunications technologies to diagnose and treat patients - has been hotly anticipated at least since 1993, when the American Telemedicine Assn. was established. But in the last two years, it has finally "taken off" thanks to better technology and lower costs, says Jim Linkous, the association's CEO. "Today 20 million Americans get some part of their health care remotely," and that number will grow as telemedicine will expand its reach, he says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000
"PC Pediatricians" (Dec. 7), about the inner-city telemedicine center, omitted the fine work performed by my staff at the county Community Development Commission, which includes the Housing Authority agency. The commission has formed a unique partnership with Drew University. We provided the crucial seed money to get the program off the ground and have jointly secured additional funding and support. This led to the opening of ophthalmology telemedicine centers at two of our public housing sites and now a third telemedicine center specializing in pediatrics.
HEALTH
February 26, 2007
Re Dr. Marc Siegel's excellent critique of the television program "House" ["The Unreal World," Feb. 12]: I have seen three episodes of "House." These dramas are so unbelievable that I have found myself both laughing out loud and cringing at the same time. The program creates a false impression about the actual methods used to solve medical dilemmas. Multiple errors are frequently present when depicting procedures. Some constitute true malpractice. Furthermore, a "go-it-alone maverick" is not the way medicine is practiced, unless you are in a remote community without other physicians for consultation.
HEALTH
February 26, 2007
Re Dr. Marc Siegel's excellent critique of the television program "House" ["The Unreal World," Feb. 12]: I have seen three episodes of "House." These dramas are so unbelievable that I have found myself both laughing out loud and cringing at the same time. The program creates a false impression about the actual methods used to solve medical dilemmas. Multiple errors are frequently present when depicting procedures. Some constitute true malpractice. Furthermore, a "go-it-alone maverick" is not the way medicine is practiced, unless you are in a remote community without other physicians for consultation.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | DAN SEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
You're calling to hear the result of that lab test you've been lying awake worrying about. Or to schedule an appointment for your wailing sick baby. After hearing "please hold," you might spend the next few minutes listening to Muzak, or to a cheery message that "your call is important to us," or to dead silence. Robert Loeb has a built a national business by offering an alternative. His Vericom Corp., based in Alpharetta, Ga.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It sounds futuristic, but telemedicine - the use of telecommunications technologies to diagnose and treat patients - has been hotly anticipated at least since 1993, when the American Telemedicine Assn. was established. But in the last two years, it has finally "taken off" thanks to better technology and lower costs, says Jim Linkous, the association's CEO. "Today 20 million Americans get some part of their health care remotely," and that number will grow as telemedicine will expand its reach, he says.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long overshadowed by other communications technologies, telemedicine may finally gain wider acceptance as a result of a decision by federal regulators to provide $400 million a year for rural health-care facilities to obtain high-speed Internet access. The Federal Communications Commission, as part of a complex restructuring of telephone rates to promote affordable "universal" service for the poor and those living in rural areas, approved the new funding on May 7.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1997 | WILLIAM McCALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the worst winters in the history of North Dakota, where the National Guard is plowing snowy highways piled higher than 18-wheelers, doctors are having no trouble connecting with their patients. They just sit in front of an interactive TV set, or dial up a computer, and practice telemedicine, the technology that is changing the way health care is managed across rural America.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jim Troxell unwinds the bandage from his patient's foot to reveal gangrene, which has eaten away much of the heel. A consulting orthopedist takes a close look, and after a few questions endorses Troxell's treatment. It's the kind of consultation that takes place in medicine all the time. But in this case, Troxell and his patient are in Kwajalein, an atoll in the South Pacific. The orthopedist is 2,200 miles away at Honolulu's Tripler Army Medical Center.
HEALTH
July 18, 2005 | Rob Stein, Washington Post
Ries Daniel was waiting in his hospital room the morning after bladder surgery when the door finally swung open. But it wasn't his doctor. Instead, a robot rolled in, wheeled over and pivoted its 15-inch video-screen "head" toward the 80-year-old lying in his bed at Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Good morning," said a voice from the robot's speaker. It was Louis Kavoussi, Daniel's urologist. His face peered down from the screen atop the 5 1/2 -foot-tall device dubbed Dr. Robot.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | Ben Dobbin, Associated Press Writer
Marilyn Gonzalez worried that her 2-year-old was coming down with an ear infection. Rather than miss work for a doctor visit, the 25-year-old single mother of two dropped her daughter off as usual at day care and went to work. Little Jaeda was examined soon afterward by a University of Rochester pediatrician and given antibiotics. Using telemedicine tools wielded by a day-care staffer, the diagnosis was done over the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2000
"PC Pediatricians" (Dec. 7), about the inner-city telemedicine center, omitted the fine work performed by my staff at the county Community Development Commission, which includes the Housing Authority agency. The commission has formed a unique partnership with Drew University. We provided the crucial seed money to get the program off the ground and have jointly secured additional funding and support. This led to the opening of ophthalmology telemedicine centers at two of our public housing sites and now a third telemedicine center specializing in pediatrics.
NEWS
November 11, 2000 | LINDSEY TANNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As Joseph Kolodzieski lay unconscious on a Baltimore hospital operating table, the doctor in charge sat more than 700 miles away, directing a remote-controlled robotic arm inside the patient's abdomen. This is 21st century telemedicine, the latest advance in a field that doctors say someday may allow a surgeon on Earth to operate on astronauts in space. Even the earthbound version that took place not long ago seemed out of this world.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | DAN SEWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
You're calling to hear the result of that lab test you've been lying awake worrying about. Or to schedule an appointment for your wailing sick baby. After hearing "please hold," you might spend the next few minutes listening to Muzak, or to a cheery message that "your call is important to us," or to dead silence. Robert Loeb has a built a national business by offering an alternative. His Vericom Corp., based in Alpharetta, Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1998 | MICHELLE RUSHLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Antiseptic lingers in the air. Medical staff escorts you in. But this is not a run-of-the-mill examination room. The doctor examining you is hundreds of miles away, and your only contact is through sophisticated camera equipment, computers, scanners and high-speed data lines.
HEALTH
July 18, 2005 | Rob Stein, Washington Post
Ries Daniel was waiting in his hospital room the morning after bladder surgery when the door finally swung open. But it wasn't his doctor. Instead, a robot rolled in, wheeled over and pivoted its 15-inch video-screen "head" toward the 80-year-old lying in his bed at Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Good morning," said a voice from the robot's speaker. It was Louis Kavoussi, Daniel's urologist. His face peered down from the screen atop the 5 1/2 -foot-tall device dubbed Dr. Robot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1998 | MICHELLE RUSHLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Antiseptic lingers in the air. Medical staff escorts you in. But this is not a run-of-the-mill examination room. The doctor examining you is hundreds of miles away, and your only contact is through sophisticated camera equipment, computers, scanners and high-speed data lines.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long overshadowed by other communications technologies, telemedicine may finally gain wider acceptance as a result of a decision by federal regulators to provide $400 million a year for rural health-care facilities to obtain high-speed Internet access. The Federal Communications Commission, as part of a complex restructuring of telephone rates to promote affordable "universal" service for the poor and those living in rural areas, approved the new funding on May 7.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1997 | WILLIAM McCALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the worst winters in the history of North Dakota, where the National Guard is plowing snowy highways piled higher than 18-wheelers, doctors are having no trouble connecting with their patients. They just sit in front of an interactive TV set, or dial up a computer, and practice telemedicine, the technology that is changing the way health care is managed across rural America.
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