Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelemundo Television Group
IN THE NEWS

Telemundo Television Group

BUSINESS
July 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Spanish-language network Telemundo is asking federal regulators to delay a decision on rival Univision Communication Inc.'s proposed $3-billion purchase of Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. Executives from Telemundo and its parent network, General Electric Co.'s NBC, told Federal Communications Commission officials in meetings last week that the Univision deal would harm competition in the Spanish-language media industry. Los Angeles-based Univision owns 50 TV stations nationwide.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 9, 2002 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union leaders pressuring NBC to extend contract coverage to TV anchors and reporters who work for Telemundo, NBC's recently acquired Spanish-language network, will take their campaign to Los Angeles City Hall today. The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists has demanded the right to organize 36 on-air employees of the two Telemundo stations in Los Angeles, KVEA-TV Channel 52 and KWHY-TV Channel 22, since NBC completed its $2.7-billion acquisition of Telemundo in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2002 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As networks explore ways to get more mileage out of their news divisions, NBC is charting ambitious plans for integrating its operations with those of Telemundo, the U.S.' second-largest Spanish-language broadcaster, after the anticipated completion of its $2.7-billion acquisition next month. The two sides have been meeting regularly to determine where cooperation is possible, hoping to help Telemundo take on Spanish-language ratings leader Univision while extending NBC's resources on the U.S.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Electric's NBC television unit on Thursday agreed to acquire Spanish-language broadcaster Telemundo for $1.98 billion in a deal that would give the venerable network entry to the nation's youngest and fastest-growing market. "This is the most dynamic television market in the U.S.--the Hispanic television market," said Bob Wright, chairman of NBC and a GE vice chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The inevitable has occurred on Spanish-language television. This fall, Telemundo, the country's second-largest Spanish-language network, will feature a staged, unscripted show about 16 aspiring actors who are locked up in a Miami television studio for several weeks. The "survivor" of the Saturday night show, "Protagonistas," will land a role on one of the network's telenovelas next year. The announcement came Monday in New York as the network unveiled its prime-time plans to advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A progressive and expensive experiment on the Spanish-language television network Telemundo was shut down this week, with the cancellation of "Los Beltran," a U.S.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2000 | Dana Calvo and Lee Romney
Telemundo Network is in talks to acquire Los Angeles-based KWHY-TV, the nation's largest independent Spanish-language channel. The transaction, which would exceed $200 million, according to sources close to the deal, signals increasingly vigorous competition for Spanish-language viewers nationwide. The Miami-based Telemundo would be the first entity to own two Spanish-language stations in a single market.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Years before Regis Philbin knotted his shiny tie and walked on to the set of ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," producers in Sevilla, Spain, were enjoying the success of their game show, "Numeros Rojos" (Red Numbers), where contestants vied for the chance to jettison their personal debt. It might not sound as sexy as collecting a million cool greenbacks, but walking away from a car payment, mortgage and credit card debt seemed chock-full o' euphoria for viewers in Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tall, barrel-chested and comically macho, the uniformed general strides onto the set of a new Spanish-language sitcom in spit-polished black boots and orders his adult son to stand at attention. For most of the next half hour of "Los Beltran," characters become tangled in a zigzag of mistaken identity before the son is forced to reveal to his father that he is gay.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|