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Telephone Industry Asia

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November 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phone Company Enters Canadian Market: Hongkong Telecommunications Ltd., one of the world's fastest-growing telephone companies, announced its first foray outside Asia. Deputy chief executive Peter Howell-Davies said that the company is setting up a Canadian operation as part of a drive to generate more revenue outside its core market. Hongkong Telecom's Canadian arm will offer long-distance telephone, fax and data services to corporate customers, primarily businesses operating in Asia.
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BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phone Company Enters Canadian Market: Hongkong Telecommunications Ltd., one of the world's fastest-growing telephone companies, announced its first foray outside Asia. Deputy chief executive Peter Howell-Davies said that the company is setting up a Canadian operation as part of a drive to generate more revenue outside its core market. Hongkong Telecom's Canadian arm will offer long-distance telephone, fax and data services to corporate customers, primarily businesses operating in Asia.
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BUSINESS
February 16, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Primitive in some places and on technology's cutting edge in others, East Asia is the world's hottest telecommunications market. In such countries as Indonesia and the Philippines, there is less than one telephone line for every 100 people. Telecommunications experts say that means there eventually will be lucrative contracts for companies that can supply the sorely needed phone systems.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Primitive in some places and on technology's cutting edge in others, East Asia is the world's hottest telecommunications market. In such countries as Indonesia and the Philippines, there is less than one telephone line for every 100 people. Telecommunications experts say that means there eventually will be lucrative contracts for companies that can supply the sorely needed phone systems.
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