Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelephone Industry Brazil
IN THE NEWS

Telephone Industry Brazil

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 9, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil on Friday raised $1.74 billion through the sale of mobile telephone licenses, as groups led by Sweden's Telia International and Atlanta-based BellSouth Corp. bid handsomely for stakes in one of the last big emerging telephone markets on the planet. "Brazil is the last of the big markets," said Peter Meurling, Telia's vice president for Latin America. "It's obvious that this is a big market with huge demand." The winning bids--more than double the government-set floor prices--bring to $4.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had Dante been a Brazilian living in the late 20th century, surely he would have found room in his Inferno for the torments of using a telephone in Brazil these days. A traveler attempting long-distance calls here recently ran into the following obstacles: Silence. Hideous feedback. A busy signal. A recorded voice. Crossed lines allowing the caller to listen to a U.S. businessman reciting his credit card and Social Security numbers to someone overseas.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 24, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil said Thursday that it will split its telephone monopoly Telecomunicacoes Brasileiras into 12 companies, paving the way to open the industry to competition and asset sales the government hopes will raise $30 billion. The government divided the telephone company, known as Telebras, into nine wireless units and three fixed-line operators. Each new company will serve a geographic region. The reorganization is to Brazil what the 1984 breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph Co.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL and PAULA GOBBI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a strong vote of confidence in Brazil that nonetheless sent thousands of protesters pouring into the streets, telephone companies from around the world anted up $19 billion on Wednesday to buy control of the nation's antiquated phone system. Police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators who marched on Rio de Janeiro's stock exchange to protest the sale to foreigners and the massive job losses they fear will result from the largest auction ever held of Latin American state-owned assets.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazil's state-controlled telecommunications market, the largest in Latin America, is on the threshold of dramatic changes that promise billions of dollars in new business opportunities for private companies. One of the many U.S. corporations in the running, big and small, is Sprint. "We are going to make the necessary investment to become a big player in Brazil," said Francisco A. Loureiro, Sprint's general manager here. "This is a key market for Sprint."
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL and PAULA GOBBI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a strong vote of confidence in Brazil that nonetheless sent thousands of protesters pouring into the streets, telephone companies from around the world anted up $19 billion on Wednesday to buy control of the nation's antiquated phone system. Police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators who marched on Rio de Janeiro's stock exchange to protest the sale to foreigners and the massive job losses they fear will result from the largest auction ever held of Latin American state-owned assets.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had Dante been a Brazilian living in the late 20th century, surely he would have found room in his Inferno for the torments of using a telephone in Brazil these days. A traveler attempting long-distance calls here recently ran into the following obstacles: Silence. Hideous feedback. A busy signal. A recorded voice. Crossed lines allowing the caller to listen to a U.S. businessman reciting his credit card and Social Security numbers to someone overseas.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
A BellSouth Corp.-led group on Wednesday paid a hefty $2.45 billion for the right to provide a second mobile-telephone service in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Latin America's largest urban telephone market. BellSouth will pay more than four times the minimum price set by the government in an auction of the rights to offer cellular service in Sao Paulo. The bid was almost $1 billion more than the next-highest offer by a group led by AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | From Washington Post
At Brazilian restaurants in Rio de Janeiro and Washington on Wednesday night, MCI Communications Corp. executives celebrated a World Cup-size telecommunications victory: their $2.3-billion winning bid for Embratel, Brazil's only long-distance carrier, which will give MCI total control over long-haul voice and data communications in Latin America's biggest market. The acquisition will also help it better serve U.S.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Three Brazilian corporations have filed a billion-dollar civil lawsuit against American Telephone & Telegraph Co. over the communication giant's withdrawal from a joint telephone book venture. The lawsuit, filed late Wednesday in federal court in Manhattan and disclosed Thursday, seeks at least $1.4 billion in compensatory damages and unspecified punitive damages from AT&T and a subsidiary, AT&T International.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1998 | From Washington Post
At Brazilian restaurants in Rio de Janeiro and Washington on Wednesday night, MCI Communications Corp. executives celebrated a World Cup-size telecommunications victory: their $2.3-billion winning bid for Embratel, Brazil's only long-distance carrier, which will give MCI total control over long-haul voice and data communications in Latin America's biggest market. The acquisition will also help it better serve U.S.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazil attached a minimum price tag of $11.7 billion to its piece of the national phone company Wednesday, setting the stage for a mega-auction that has the rapt attention of jumpy investors, eager international bidders, frazzled Brazilian consumers and a cash-hungry government. Brazil's expectations from the sale of Telecomunicacoes Brasileiras, or Telebras, have waned steadily since the Asian crisis began last year.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1998 | Bloomberg News, Times Staff
The breakup of Brazil's equivalent of Ma Bell is imminent, and investors are lining up to bid for the pieces. Is Warren Buffett in that lineup? Opportunity Capital Partners, one of Brazil's biggest money managers, said it has approached the American billionaire about making a joint bid for one or more of the telephone companies to be sold in July as part of the $20-billion breakup of Telecomunicacoes Brasileiras, or Telebras for short.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil said Thursday that it will split its telephone monopoly Telecomunicacoes Brasileiras into 12 companies, paving the way to open the industry to competition and asset sales the government hopes will raise $30 billion. The government divided the telephone company, known as Telebras, into nine wireless units and three fixed-line operators. Each new company will serve a geographic region. The reorganization is to Brazil what the 1984 breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph Co.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil on Friday raised $1.74 billion through the sale of mobile telephone licenses, as groups led by Sweden's Telia International and Atlanta-based BellSouth Corp. bid handsomely for stakes in one of the last big emerging telephone markets on the planet. "Brazil is the last of the big markets," said Peter Meurling, Telia's vice president for Latin America. "It's obvious that this is a big market with huge demand." The winning bids--more than double the government-set floor prices--bring to $4.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
A BellSouth Corp.-led group on Wednesday paid a hefty $2.45 billion for the right to provide a second mobile-telephone service in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Latin America's largest urban telephone market. BellSouth will pay more than four times the minimum price set by the government in an auction of the rights to offer cellular service in Sao Paulo. The bid was almost $1 billion more than the next-highest offer by a group led by AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1998 | Bloomberg News, Times Staff
The breakup of Brazil's equivalent of Ma Bell is imminent, and investors are lining up to bid for the pieces. Is Warren Buffett in that lineup? Opportunity Capital Partners, one of Brazil's biggest money managers, said it has approached the American billionaire about making a joint bid for one or more of the telephone companies to be sold in July as part of the $20-billion breakup of Telecomunicacoes Brasileiras, or Telebras for short.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Forms Brazilian Joint Venture: AT&T Corp. said it is forming a joint venture with two Brazilian partners to pursue wireless telecommunications services. The venture is expected to invest more than $1 billion over the next five years in communications services to customers in Brazil. AT&T said it will hold 40% of the voting equity in the venture company.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazil's state-controlled telecommunications market, the largest in Latin America, is on the threshold of dramatic changes that promise billions of dollars in new business opportunities for private companies. One of the many U.S. corporations in the running, big and small, is Sprint. "We are going to make the necessary investment to become a big player in Brazil," said Francisco A. Loureiro, Sprint's general manager here. "This is a key market for Sprint."
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Forms Brazilian Joint Venture: AT&T Corp. said it is forming a joint venture with two Brazilian partners to pursue wireless telecommunications services. The venture is expected to invest more than $1 billion over the next five years in communications services to customers in Brazil. AT&T said it will hold 40% of the voting equity in the venture company.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|