Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelephone Industry California
IN THE NEWS

Telephone Industry California

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 26, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey R. Hultman, president and chief executive of PacTel Cellular, likes to tell his employees that they are pioneers in a "100-year business." Taking a long-term view keeps a decision such as which of two competing cellular phone technologies to adopt from seeming quite so daunting, he says. Even so, Hultman and other cellular industry executives are grappling with the biggest technological transition in the industry's brief history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | Elizabeth Douglass
Pacific Bell on Wednesday formally applied for state permission to sell long-distance phone service in California, culminating three years of hearings, filings and skirmishes with competitors. To win approval, PacBell must prove to the California Public Utilities Commission and the Federal Communications Commission that it has sufficiently opened up its local phone network to rival companies. AT&T Corp., WorldCom Inc.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of this East Mojave Desert outpost are accustomed to doing without a lot of society's modern conveniences. There are no automated teller machines, no fast-food restaurants, no video rental shops and mighty few gas stations. Hardy souls, these folks can tolerate such deprivations. But there's one thing they're sick and tired of living without: telephones.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pay phone in Goodyears Bar, population 100, is gone. So is the one in Gazelle, population 400, and the one at the public school in pint-sized Pike. The ubiquitous pay phone is disappearing from lonely outposts and city street corners throughout the state, the victim of cellular phone competition and other economic pressures. In the last year, companies yanked out about 1,000 pay phones a month in California.
NEWS
January 22, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pay phone in Goodyears Bar, population 100, is gone. So is the one in Gazelle, population 400, and the one at the public school in pint-sized Pike. The ubiquitous pay phone is disappearing from lonely outposts and city street corners throughout the state, the victim of cellular phone competition and other economic pressures. In the last year, companies yanked out about 1,000 pay phones a month in California.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
How about a public policy initiative that could simultaneously cut traffic congestion, reduce air pollution and accelerate technological innovation--all without costing California's taxpayers an extra penny? Too good to be true? No, just too obvious to be ignored. With but a smidgen of creativity, Pacific Bell and the state Public Utilities Commission could offer telecommunications tariffs that make it simpler and easier for California business to invest some energy and thought in telecommuting.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The explosion of new area codes will slow dramatically in California and nationwide because of new state and federal policies aimed at forcing phone companies to use hundreds of millions of unissued phone numbers. Consumers and businesses have grown increasingly frustrated by the expense and disruption of adopting new area codes. California has been hardest hit by their proliferation--with 25 area codes statewide, up from 13 in 1997.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quality of Pacific Bell's residential telephone service has dipped markedly and customer dissatisfaction has more than doubled in the years since California's dominant phone company was taken over by SBC Communications, according to a complaint filed Thursday by a state consumer agency.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A consumer advocacy group Thursday asked the state Public Utilities Commission to fine Pacific Bell $50 million for improperly assessing late-payment and reconnect charges to thousands of California customers. San Francisco-based Toward Utility Rate Normalization (TURN) said the telephone company deliberately chose to delay processing customer phone-bill payments rather than hire additional staff to handle them.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Negotiators for Pacific Bell and the major union representing the phone company's workers in California continued meeting in Oakland on Friday against a strike deadline of midnight tonight when the current three-year contract expires. Leaders of the Communications Workers of America, which represents more than 41,000 employees at Pacific Bell, have vowed that the union will walk out unless they receive an acceptable offer before that.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, elizabeth.douglass@latimes.com
Many Californians recently got a letter from a group calling itself Project Connect California. The letter laments the confusing array of telecommunications companies and regulations and promises to help. "We want to help you not only understand what's happening in the telecommunications industry, but also have a voice in it," the letter reads. "We don't want you to be intimidated by telecommunications.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State regulators have launched an investigation into sales practices at Qwest Communications, a phone company that has provoked tens of thousands of complaints from Californians who say they were billed for services they didn't order or had their long-distance service switched without their permission. The probe by the California Public Utilities Commission comes as state officials move to step up enforcement of telecommunications fraud.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quality of Pacific Bell's residential telephone service has dipped markedly and customer dissatisfaction has more than doubled in the years since California's dominant phone company was taken over by SBC Communications, according to a complaint filed Thursday by a state consumer agency.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | NANCY VOGEL and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With two days left before lawmakers disband for the year, the state Senate on Tuesday moved to cap San Diego Gas & Electric power rates by passing a new version of a consumer relief bill. In a separate action, the Senate approved and sent to the Assembly a bill to create a special monitor with significant authority to oversee the Los Angeles Unified School District.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Sempra Energy on Wednesday said the California Public Utilities Commission granted its Sempra Communications unit authority to provide local telephone service in the state. San Diego-based Sempra, owner of the largest U.S. natural-gas utility, said it is considering alliances with telecommunications companies. The license allows Sempra to offer telecom services using only equipment installed within or on existing buildings and structures.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | Elizabeth Douglass
The state Public Utilities Commission will hold the first in a series of public meetings Thursday as it considers stepped-up consumer protections concerning phone companies. The hearing will be at the Northeast Valley Senior Multipurpose Center, 11300 Glenoaks Blvd. in Pacoima. From 6 to 7 p.m., state officials and phone companies will answer billing and service questions. From 7 to 9 p.m., PUC Commissioner Carl Wood will discuss his proposed "Telephone Consumers' Bill of Rights."
BUSINESS
March 26, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's chief utility regulator offered a plan Thursday to make it easier for California cellular telephone operators to lower their rates, now among the very highest in the nation. And if the operators don't lower them, Public Utility Commission Chairman Daniel Fessler said, "we're going to have to lower rates for them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legislation that would place stricter controls on area code overlays goes before the state Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday, but action very likely will be delayed because of the bill's $529,610 price tag, officials said. The Consumer Area Code Relief Act is one of hundreds of bills expected to come before the 13-member committee when it convenes Monday morning.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California phone companies are pressing federal regulators to force the introduction of at least 12 new area codes statewide, including six more in the Los Angeles region. The request to override the state's phone number conservation measures, contained in a May 12 letter to the FCC only recently made public, argues that prolonged rationing of new phone numbers means that "California carriers are effectively denied the equitable access to numbers guaranteed to them by the Telecommunications Act."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|