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BUSINESS
June 1, 1999
Primus Telecommunications Group Inc. said it has bought AT&T Canada Corp.'s residential phone and Internet business for $39 million in cash and assumed debt to more than triple its customer base in Canada. Primus, a McLean, Va.-based provider of voice and data services, is gaining 450,000 new customers. Times Business News on Radio: Our reporters provide perspective on markets, entertainment and other news on the KFWB-Los Angeles Times Noon Business Hour, every weekday on KFWB-AM (980).
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BUSINESS
June 1, 1999
Primus Telecommunications Group Inc. said it has bought AT&T Canada Corp.'s residential phone and Internet business for $39 million in cash and assumed debt to more than triple its customer base in Canada. Primus, a McLean, Va.-based provider of voice and data services, is gaining 450,000 new customers. Times Business News on Radio: Our reporters provide perspective on markets, entertainment and other news on the KFWB-Los Angeles Times Noon Business Hour, every weekday on KFWB-AM (980).
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BUSINESS
June 13, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Friday opened this country's $6.3-billion long-distance telephone market to competition in a decision that could also open the door to American suppliers. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission ruled in response to applications from Unitel Communications Inc. of Toronto and BC Rail Telecommunications/Lightel Inc. consortium of Vancouver. The decision to allow competing long-distance services promised to end Bell Canada's century-old monopoly.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Ameritech Corp., the local phone company set to be acquired by SBC Communications Inc., said it will buy a 20% stake in Bell Canada, Canada's leading carrier, for $3.4 billion. The deal with Bell Canada parent BCE Inc. would fill a key gap in the North American operations of SBC and Ameritech while giving them a stake in Canada's recently deregulated phone market. It also follows AT&T Corp.'s purchase of a stake in a rival Canadian phone company.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1992 | From Reuters
The battle over Canada's lucrative long-distance telephone market will heat up today when Unitel Communications Inc. is expected to unveil its new service, which will challenge former monopoly carrier Bell Canada. Unitel, a partnership between Canadian Pacific and Rogers Communications Inc., announced that it intended to jump into the business after Canada's telephone regulator--the Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission--ended Bell's 100-year monopoly. At stake is a $6.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phone Company Enters Canadian Market: Hongkong Telecommunications Ltd., one of the world's fastest-growing telephone companies, announced its first foray outside Asia. Deputy chief executive Peter Howell-Davies said that the company is setting up a Canadian operation as part of a drive to generate more revenue outside its core market. Hongkong Telecom's Canadian arm will offer long-distance telephone, fax and data services to corporate customers, primarily businesses operating in Asia.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Having been sickened and outraged by the report of the tragic and unnecessary accident in Temecula involving Border Patrol officers, illegal immigrants and innocent citizens, I am compelled to write this letter. This needless slaughter caused by high-speed chases, by people who are hired to protect us, is absolutely senseless! There have been many such chases recently, some televised, which were potential accidents and certainly put people's lives in jeopardy.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Ameritech Corp., the local phone company set to be acquired by SBC Communications Inc., said it will buy a 20% stake in Bell Canada, Canada's leading carrier, for $3.4 billion. The deal with Bell Canada parent BCE Inc. would fill a key gap in the North American operations of SBC and Ameritech while giving them a stake in Canada's recently deregulated phone market. It also follows AT&T Corp.'s purchase of a stake in a rival Canadian phone company.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phone Company Enters Canadian Market: Hongkong Telecommunications Ltd., one of the world's fastest-growing telephone companies, announced its first foray outside Asia. Deputy chief executive Peter Howell-Davies said that the company is setting up a Canadian operation as part of a drive to generate more revenue outside its core market. Hongkong Telecom's Canadian arm will offer long-distance telephone, fax and data services to corporate customers, primarily businesses operating in Asia.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1992 | From Reuters
The battle over Canada's lucrative long-distance telephone market will heat up today when Unitel Communications Inc. is expected to unveil its new service, which will challenge former monopoly carrier Bell Canada. Unitel, a partnership between Canadian Pacific and Rogers Communications Inc., announced that it intended to jump into the business after Canada's telephone regulator--the Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission--ended Bell's 100-year monopoly. At stake is a $6.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government on Friday opened this country's $6.3-billion long-distance telephone market to competition in a decision that could also open the door to American suppliers. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission ruled in response to applications from Unitel Communications Inc. of Toronto and BC Rail Telecommunications/Lightel Inc. consortium of Vancouver. The decision to allow competing long-distance services promised to end Bell Canada's century-old monopoly.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Having been sickened and outraged by the report of the tragic and unnecessary accident in Temecula involving Border Patrol officers, illegal immigrants and innocent citizens, I am compelled to write this letter. This needless slaughter caused by high-speed chases, by people who are hired to protect us, is absolutely senseless! There have been many such chases recently, some televised, which were potential accidents and certainly put people's lives in jeopardy.
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