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BUSINESS
December 17, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling once more its determination to buy NCR Corp., American Telephone & Telegraph announced on Sunday that it will seek to take over NCR's board and disarm the computer maker's anti-takeover defenses. Such a proxy challenge was widely expected following the NCR board's unanimous vote last Thursday to reject AT&T's $6.1-billion, $90-per-share cash offer for the nation's fifth-largest computer firm.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Mexico's antitrust regulators expect to start an investigation into the nation's fixed-line telephone industry by early next year, a second challenge to the companies that made billionaire Carlos Slim one of the world's richest people. Eduardo Perez Motta, president of the country's Federal Competition Commission, said Tuesday that the agency was reviewing complaints filed this month by Spanish phone company Telefonica against Slim's Telefonos de Mexico before starting the probe.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Recent editions of "Who's Who in the West" and "Who's Who of Emerging Leaders In America" describe the achievements of a son of the late J. Elroy McCaw, a Seattle entrepreneur who built a communications empire. Surprisingly, though, the listing is for Elroy's first-born son, an insurance executive, and not Craig O. McCaw, the second son, who has jolted the big regional phone companies by becoming the undisputed leader of the hot new cellular telephone industry. After starting out with a small cable television concern inherited by the four McCaw sons, 39-year-old Craig McCaw has led the way into building Kirkland, Wash.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2003 | Ben Klayman, Reuters
Staring out over the lush green grass of the baseball diamond in a stadium emblazoned with his company's name, Jack Rooney is grinning broadly. The chief executive of U.S. Cellular Corp., the eighth-largest U.S. wireless operator, was not on the field during July's Major League Baseball All-Star Game at U.S. Cellular Field. Nonetheless, he felt as though he had hit a home run with all the free airtime his Chicago-based company received during the nationally televised game. "We're loving it.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990
The comments made by Los Angeles Assemblywoman Gwen Moore in "Cellular Telephone Blues" (June 10) may be well intended, but she seems to be either mis- or uninformed. Cellular telephone service is anything but a fixed-cost business. For every subscriber added to a cellular system, additional radios in each cell, more telephone lines (for which operators pay a hefty fee to Pacific Bell), more microwave equipment to link the cells to the central computer and ultimately more cells (each at about $1 million)
BUSINESS
November 28, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Mexico's antitrust regulators expect to start an investigation into the nation's fixed-line telephone industry by early next year, a second challenge to the companies that made billionaire Carlos Slim one of the world's richest people. Eduardo Perez Motta, president of the country's Federal Competition Commission, said Tuesday that the agency was reviewing complaints filed this month by Spanish phone company Telefonica against Slim's Telefonos de Mexico before starting the probe.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2003 | Ben Klayman, Reuters
Staring out over the lush green grass of the baseball diamond in a stadium emblazoned with his company's name, Jack Rooney is grinning broadly. The chief executive of U.S. Cellular Corp., the eighth-largest U.S. wireless operator, was not on the field during July's Major League Baseball All-Star Game at U.S. Cellular Field. Nonetheless, he felt as though he had hit a home run with all the free airtime his Chicago-based company received during the nationally televised game. "We're loving it.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For online and Internet service providers and their growing legions of customers, the massive network outage that left more than 6 million America Online Inc. subscribers offline Wednesday was an unwelcome reminder that when it comes to reliability and service, the technology industry is caught between a rock and a hard place.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unveiling the first crackdown of its type in the nation, Los Angeles law enforcement officials will announce today the arrest of nearly two dozen men and the seizure of electronic gear capable of stealing millions of dollars worth of air time from Southern California's cellular companies. Using the code name "L.A.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Welch knew something was wrong when he saw the $1,500 bill from LA Cellular--more than 10 times what it should have been. The retired Hollywood resident, it turns out, was the victim of a new strain of fraud that began in Southern California and is spreading nationwide. His cellular phone had been "cloned"--enabling someone with an illegally purchased telephone, equipped with a counterfeit electronic device, to place calls for free and bill them to Welch.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For online and Internet service providers and their growing legions of customers, the massive network outage that left more than 6 million America Online Inc. subscribers offline Wednesday was an unwelcome reminder that when it comes to reliability and service, the technology industry is caught between a rock and a hard place.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling once more its determination to buy NCR Corp., American Telephone & Telegraph announced on Sunday that it will seek to take over NCR's board and disarm the computer maker's anti-takeover defenses. Such a proxy challenge was widely expected following the NCR board's unanimous vote last Thursday to reject AT&T's $6.1-billion, $90-per-share cash offer for the nation's fifth-largest computer firm.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990
The comments made by Los Angeles Assemblywoman Gwen Moore in "Cellular Telephone Blues" (June 10) may be well intended, but she seems to be either mis- or uninformed. Cellular telephone service is anything but a fixed-cost business. For every subscriber added to a cellular system, additional radios in each cell, more telephone lines (for which operators pay a hefty fee to Pacific Bell), more microwave equipment to link the cells to the central computer and ultimately more cells (each at about $1 million)
BUSINESS
June 19, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Recent editions of "Who's Who in the West" and "Who's Who of Emerging Leaders In America" describe the achievements of a son of the late J. Elroy McCaw, a Seattle entrepreneur who built a communications empire. Surprisingly, though, the listing is for Elroy's first-born son, an insurance executive, and not Craig O. McCaw, the second son, who has jolted the big regional phone companies by becoming the undisputed leader of the hot new cellular telephone industry. After starting out with a small cable television concern inherited by the four McCaw sons, 39-year-old Craig McCaw has led the way into building Kirkland, Wash.
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