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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002
Radio talk show host Dennis Prager will host the 22nd annual "L'Chaim--To Life" telethon on KCAL-TV Sunday. The seven-hour event raises money for Chabad of California, a not-for-profit Jewish organization that operates nonsectarian social services such as schools, summer camps, drug rehabilitation centers and seniors' programs. Airing from 5 p.m.
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NEWS
April 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
A princess donated her Rolls-Royce, one woman gave up her dowry and other Saudis poured millions of dollars into a fund to help families of Palestinian "martyrs" in a nationwide telethon Thursday. Wheelchair-bound children braved unseasonable rain in Riyadh, the capital, to drop cash into plastic boxes outside the state-run television station, which, along with the radio, was organizing the drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
"America: A Tribute to Heroes" on DVD is a reminder of how much the nation was in shock in the days after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and the Pentagon. That element alone establishes "Tribute" as one of the great concert documents ever.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Organizers of last Friday's two-hour telethon to raise money for victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack said Monday that the program generated more than $150 million in pledges, with accountants still tallying. The event, carried on dozens of broadcast and cable television channels, may raise millions of dollars more through the release of an album compiled from Friday's performances, which included those by U2, Bruce Springsteen, Celine Dion, Mariah Carey and Bon Jovi.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
This is a different war, we've heard nightly on television from politicians and talking heads, and Friday's telethon reminded us this is a different era in popular music as well. The rock 'n' roll descendants of blues and folk artists, who would have been excluded from earlier prime-time showcases as voices of rebellion, have become the ones the country turns to as voices of unity. The defining moment during a national World War II radio benefit: Bing Crosby singing Irving Berlin.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | DANA CALVO and ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A telethon by the ambassadors of pop culture drew more viewers than President Bush's speech to Congress during which he declared war on terrorism. An estimated 89 million viewers tuned in at some point to Friday night's "America: A Tribute to Heroes." That is 7 million more than tuned in to Bush's address the night before and nearly 5 million more than watched the 2001 Super Bowl.
NEWS
September 22, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
What a moment, what a truce. So there is hope for world peace. If the fractious television industry can come together without shedding blood, anyone can. Did it ever unite Friday night on one channel after another, generously and for the best of reasons, defying its own 1st Commandment (Thou shalt be big, splashy, greedy, competitive and cost-effective) while bucking traditions going back half a century. Glitz and glam? Forget it. Egos? On hold. Self-love? See ya later. Smarmy speeches?
NEWS
September 22, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a singularly American response to crisis, a group of pop culture superstars took over the airwaves Friday night for an unprecedented telethon to raise money for victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Even in this information age, the communal moment of charity, grief and celebrity beamed to televisions, radios and computers across the globe was historic in reach.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top executives from all four major television networks had just one question for Joel Gallen last weekend: Was it feasible to pull together--in only four business days--a memorable two-hour telecast to raise money for victims of the terrorist attack? Gallen's mind began to race. Could he line up the talent, the stages and the crews on such short notice? It usually took him two months of full-time work to produce the MTV music and movie award shows.
NEWS
September 19, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four major broadcast networks confirmed plans Tuesday to simulcast a commercial-free two-hour program Friday night to raise money for the families of the victims of last week's terrorist attacks. The fund-raiser, which will be called "America: A Tribute to Heroes," will feature musical acts including the Dixie Chicks, Alicia Keys, Sheryl Crow, Neil Young, Stevie Wonder, Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, Tom Petty, Billy Joel, Faith Hill and Paul Simon.
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