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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Meg James
  This is a sample post for the p2p training     Related: On Location: 'Think Like a Man' brings romance to Culver City On Location: 'Hemingway & Gellhorn' sets global stage in San Francisco On Location: HBO crew members out of 'Luck'    
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A Mexican regulatory agency has ordered the massive companies that dominate this nation's telephone and broadcast television sectors to share their network infrastructure with competitors, a move that could seriously alter Mexico's telecommunications landscape in the months and years to come. The rulings by the Federal Telecommunications Institute appeared to be a "step in the right direction" for the Mexican economy, said George W. Grayson, a Mexico specialist at the College of William and Mary.
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BUSINESS
December 14, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's premier entertainment company made a spectacular stock market debut this week in the midst of a slump at the Mexican Stock Exchange. In Mexico's largest initial public offering, investors paid $750 million for 20% of Televisa, which owns 211 media-related businesses worldwide. At $12.50 a share, the sales price was $1 more than the top price expected. The stock rose $1.17 in its first day of trading Tuesday, as the rest of the Mexican market plummeted. A simultaneous placement among U.
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Soraya Jimenez, who won the 58-kilogram weightlifting competition at the 2000 Sydney Games to become Mexico's first female Olympic champion, died of a heart attack Thursday at her home in Mexico City. She was 35. Jimenez, who retired after numerous injuries and surgeries to her left knee. She was described in a statement by the Mexico Olympic Committee as one of her country's "most beloved athletes. " She won her gold medal with a lift of 497 pounds. Following her retirement from competition before the 2004 Athens Games, Jimenez became a broadcaster for Televisa, the largest Spanish-language media company in the world and parent of Univision in the U.S. Jimenez had been accused of doping in 2002 but was exonerated of the charges.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A Mexican regulatory agency has ordered the massive companies that dominate this nation's telephone and broadcast television sectors to share their network infrastructure with competitors, a move that could seriously alter Mexico's telecommunications landscape in the months and years to come. The rulings by the Federal Telecommunications Institute appeared to be a "step in the right direction" for the Mexican economy, said George W. Grayson, a Mexico specialist at the College of William and Mary.
WORLD
November 26, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
If it were a soap opera (and it sure feels like one), Saturday's big event would be the pull-out-the-stops season finale. The script calls for wedding bells. After months of buildup, the man who could be Mexico's next president, Enrique Pena Nieto, is to marry a real-life soap opera star, Angelica Rivera, in a ceremony some hype-mongers here have dared dub "the wedding of the century. " Chatter over the nuptials is all over Mexican magazines, Twitter and Facebook, where the handsome couple posted a Brady Bunch-style photo of themselves and the six children they will soon blend into a family.
WORLD
August 13, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Here they were again, marching through the dark and the rain - the preppies from private universities, the hipsters in fat-lace skater sneakers, the young intellectuals with faces framed in wispy Che Guevara beards, the regular kids with backpacks and smartphones. They pooled by the thousands on Avenida Chapultepec in front of the headquarters ofMexico'smost powerful broadcaster, brandishing signs and banners, trailed by an opportunistic band of hot dog and taco vendors.
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991
It was refreshing to read the bold piece about Emilio Azcarraga and Televisa ("El Tigre," by Marjorie Miller and Juanita Darling, Nov. 10). During the early 1980s, I worked as co-executive producer and director of operations for a Televisa subsidiary, International Videofilms. The Televisa powers arrogantly and blindly, without adequate market research, decided to spend several millions of dollars to dub into English a half-dozen of their long-running Spanish language soaps. The project was a total failure.
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Soraya Jimenez, who won the 58-kilogram weightlifting competition at the 2000 Sydney Games to become Mexico's first female Olympic champion, died of a heart attack Thursday at her home in Mexico City. She was 35. Jimenez, who retired after numerous injuries and surgeries to her left knee. She was described in a statement by the Mexico Olympic Committee as one of her country's "most beloved athletes. " She won her gold medal with a lift of 497 pounds. Following her retirement from competition before the 2004 Athens Games, Jimenez became a broadcaster for Televisa, the largest Spanish-language media company in the world and parent of Univision in the U.S. Jimenez had been accused of doping in 2002 but was exonerated of the charges.
WORLD
January 26, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Carlos Slim's telecommunications empire, Telmex, is poised to get a new shot at realizing its long-held goal of entering Mexico's television market after a regulatory board this week approved rules that may allow the world's richest man to launch a for-pay TV channel.  Mexico's television market is almost completely dominated by the duopoly of media giant Televisa and  TV Azteca, which together control about 95% of what viewers see and hear on the country's airwaves.
WORLD
March 12, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - President Enrique Peña Nieto on Monday touted proposed new reforms to boost competition in Mexico's highly concentrated telecommunications sector - moves that could weaken the influence of billionaire Carlos Slim and television giant Televisa. The proposed constitutional reforms would create a new, autonomous Federal Telecommunications Institute, which could apply special rules to help small telecom companies compete with big ones, and even force large firms to sell assets if they are deemed too big. The proposal would also make room for new digital TV broadcast networks, and would create a new public broadcasting channel.
WORLD
January 26, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Carlos Slim's telecommunications empire, Telmex, is poised to get a new shot at realizing its long-held goal of entering Mexico's television market after a regulatory board this week approved rules that may allow the world's richest man to launch a for-pay TV channel.  Mexico's television market is almost completely dominated by the duopoly of media giant Televisa and  TV Azteca, which together control about 95% of what viewers see and hear on the country's airwaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Soap operas may be nearly dead in the United States, but telenovelas remain a booming industry in Mexico and throughout Latin America. "The Factory of Dreams" by photographer Stefan Ruiz goes behind the scenes at Televisa, the world's largest producer of telenovelas . From 2003 to '11, Ruiz was granted access to the actors and sets at Televisa's Mexico City studio and at the Centro de Educación Artística, Televisa's soap opera acting school,...
WORLD
August 13, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Here they were again, marching through the dark and the rain - the preppies from private universities, the hipsters in fat-lace skater sneakers, the young intellectuals with faces framed in wispy Che Guevara beards, the regular kids with backpacks and smartphones. They pooled by the thousands on Avenida Chapultepec in front of the headquarters ofMexico'smost powerful broadcaster, brandishing signs and banners, trailed by an opportunistic band of hot dog and taco vendors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Meg James
  This is a sample post for the p2p training     Related: On Location: 'Think Like a Man' brings romance to Culver City On Location: 'Hemingway & Gellhorn' sets global stage in San Francisco On Location: HBO crew members out of 'Luck'    
WORLD
September 1, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Two women from the world of Mexico City journalism were abducted and slain, their naked, bound bodies found Thursday in a field behind a cemetery, authorities said. Although dozens of journalists have been killed, kidnapped or threatened as part of Mexico's spiraling violence, this appears to be the first time news media employees have been slain in the relative safe harbor of Mexico City. It was not immediately known whether the attacks on the women were related to their work.
NEWS
August 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
In what would be a crucial victory ahead of the 2000 presidential elections, the opposition National Action Party, or PAN, captured the governor's seat in the central state of Aguascalientes, according to television exit polls. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, however, said its own polls showed it was hanging on to Aguascalientes by 4 percentage points.
WORLD
August 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexican federal police on Saturday rescued two of four journalists kidnapped five days earlier by a drug gang in northern Mexico, authorities said. The case highlighted the dangers faced by journalists in Mexico, where criminal gangs often seek to silence news coverage or slant it in their favor. The captors had demanded the airing of homemade videos that linked a rival gang to corrupt police in the states of Durango and Coahuila. Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna said intelligence work led to a predawn operation that freed cameramen Javier Canales of Multimedios Laguna and Alejandro Hernandez of Televisa from a house in Gomez Palacio, Durango.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
One weekly drama probes modern manhood in famously macho Mexico. Another show traipses through trendy Mexico City on the heels of not-quite-grown-up grown-ups fumbling with life and love. A third plunges underground, where strange experiments are taking place in the city's sewers. (It's a cop drama, no less.) If your idea of Mexican television is the sappy soap opera known as the telenovela , think again. Led by its public-television broadcaster, Mexico is producing a new breed of TV series ?
WORLD
November 26, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
If it were a soap opera (and it sure feels like one), Saturday's big event would be the pull-out-the-stops season finale. The script calls for wedding bells. After months of buildup, the man who could be Mexico's next president, Enrique Pena Nieto, is to marry a real-life soap opera star, Angelica Rivera, in a ceremony some hype-mongers here have dared dub "the wedding of the century. " Chatter over the nuptials is all over Mexican magazines, Twitter and Facebook, where the handsome couple posted a Brady Bunch-style photo of themselves and the six children they will soon blend into a family.
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