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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009
SAVANNAH GUTHRIE MSNBC ANCHOR Five years ago, Savannah Guthrie rolled the dice and walked away from a promising legal career to try to make it in television news. After a little more than a year at NBC, she landed the plum job of covering the White House. And in two weeks, Guthrie will add new duties to her plate: She'll be anchoring a daily morning show on MSNBC with Chief White House Correspondent Chuck Todd. "It's beyond any reporter's dream," the 38-year-old said of her current assignment, for which she rises by 4:30 a.m. to cram information about toxic assets, Afghanistan and healthcare reform.
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OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "Patt Morrison Asks: Jeanie Buss, Laker woman," Opinion, April 9 Asked about Dodger fans' TV discomfort, Lakers President Jeanie Buss said: "We went through that last year…but the deal we did allowed all our games to be in one place. Before, half our games were on Fox and the other half were on KCAL. Each of them had other programming after the game or before. The Laker channel allows us to have pregame and postgame shows, and ancillary programming; it allows people more of a connection with the team.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Scott Collins
[ This story has been corrected. See bottom of post for details .] Sunday's Super Bowl may not have been exciting football, but it drew record TV ratings anyway. An average of 111.5-million total viewers tuned in to Fox to see the Seattle Seahawks stomp the Denver Broncos, 43-8, making it the most-watched TV program in U.S. history, according to Nielsen. That was just a hair above record-setting 111.3 million for the 2011 Giants-Patriots Super Bowl XLV on NBC. Three of the last four Super Bowls have set television audience records, making the annual winter game one of the very few TV programs showing steady growth in viewing.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | David Lazarus
Call it a curveball that nobody wants to swing at. After decades of forcing consumers to pay for channels they don't want, the pay-TV industry is strongly resisting Time Warner Cable's efforts to make subscribers of all its rivals pony up $4 to $5 a month for a Dodgers channel. All eyes are currently on satellite heavyweight DirecTV, whose 1.2 million Los Angeles customers give it a roughly 30% share of the local pay-TV market, slightly less than Time Warner's estimated one-third market share.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Relax, TV programmers. The teen viewer isn't going anywhere. The perception of today's teenagers is that of antsy kids bouncing back and forth between their computer screens and cellphones as they update their Facebook statuses and look at videos on Hulu and YouTube while texting their friends. The reality is that for all the time teens spend staring at small screens, it's still the television screen that gets most of their attention. "There is a popularized notion of the typical teenager constantly digitally connected....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Sundance Channel's "Rectify" is the first and possibly only television show one can imagine Flannery O'Connor blogging about. It isn't just good TV, it's revelatory TV. The genre's biggest potential game changer since AMC debuted the one-two punch of "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad. " "Television can do that?" we asked in wonder as Don Draper squinted in cultural allegory over his Scotch on the rocks. Yes it can, and now, thanks to creator Ray McKinnon and the cast of "Rectify," television can also immerse the viewer in a gloriously rich and careful study of how endurance and faith, strength and surrender, fear and serenity balance to form the essential nature of humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011
Pioneers of Television infobox 1/18/11 'Pioneers of Television' Where: KOCE When: 8 p.m. Tuesday Rating: TV-G (suitable for all ages)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Cindy Chang and Ruben Vives
Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies mistakenly shot two hostages, killing one, earlier this week as the men fled a knife-wielding captor in West Hollywood, officials said Thursday. John Winkler, a 30-year-old TV production assistant who had recently arrived from Washington state to pursue a career in entertainment, was hit once in the chest when three deputies opened fire on him Monday night at an apartment complex, officials said in a statement. UPDATES: Death toll rises in deadly bus crash He died at a local hospital.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014
L.A. has great sports fans. Uniquely loyal, yet never to be had. If Time Warner Cable thinks the notion "I need my Dodgers.com" even remotely resonates, they're advised to go back and review "I need my Rams & Raiders.com. " Anthony J. Moretti Lomita :: I realize that this full-page ad for Dodgers baseball on SportsNet L.A. is big money, but, I, for one, don't want my cable bill to go up, even one more dollar, in order to pay over-salaried players. To my TV provider, I'm willing to "miss this" and attend a few games in the season at Chavez Ravine instead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Chorale master Paul Salamunovich once said that the greatest moment of his life was a 1988 concert at the Vatican for Pope John Paul II with the group he had led continuously since 1949, the St. Charles Borromeo Church Choir of North Hollywood. But it was his experience with choral music as a Southern California teenager that provided the underpinning for nearly everything he did over the next six-plus decades, including his role in shaping the Los Angeles Master Chorale into one of the world's finest choirs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | Steve Lopez
The dreaded Giants were in town and Dodger fans were out in force on opening day, tailgating, wearing the blue and turning Elysian Park into a giant latrine. Chad Kline of Echo Park was walking his dog, Lola, early Friday morning when he saw fans hiking up into the bushes between Scott and Academy Roads to water the plants. "I went up to these three motorcycle officers … and informed them about 15 gentlemen were urinating in the park and I said, 'I think it's illegal, what are you going to do about it?
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
Four minutes before Hyun-Jin Ryu threw the first pitch of the Dodgers' home opener Friday, Time Warner Cable hit the send button. Vin Scully had just handed the ceremonial first pitch to Sandy Koufax, two of the most beloved sports figures in Los Angeles history teaming up to welcome baseball back to Dodger Stadium. It was a goosebump moment in person and on television, except that most of Southern California cannot see the Dodgers on television. In an email blast to DirecTV subscribers demanding their Dodgers, TWC put the blame on DirecTV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014
Sandy Grossman, 78, a television sports director who oversaw broadcasts of a record 10 Super Bowls and introduced several innovations to TV sports coverage, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his son Dean. Grossman won eight Emmys for his work in a career that spanned more than four decades. From early on, he sought to not just cover the action, but also humanize sports matches by concentrating on individuals. "A good football broadcast should be like a good novel," Grossman said in a 1980 Los Angeles Times interview.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn and Chris O'Brien
REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - Silicon Valley, with its influence and economic clout soaring to all-time highs, is having its pop culture moment. But the stream of movies, books, even a reality TV show spotlighting nerdy start-up culture have all been widely panned locally as cheap caricatures. With Sunday's kickoff of Mike Judge's "Silicon Valley" comedy series on HBO, the geeks here say Hollywood finally gets them - even as it mocks them. "It was like watching a bizarro version of your own reality," said Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk, after the Silicon Valley premiere Wednesday night at this city's historic Fox Theatre, where stars of the show walked the red carpet and the tech glitterati came out in force.
SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
My whopper of a journey ended in a Burger King, in front of a darkened TV screen hanging in a corner obscured by a tall guy eating a bag of fries. The Dodgers game had just ended, and I had missed it. All of it. Every pitch, every hit, every Vin. My Tuesday afternoon quest to watch the Dodgers' first domestic appearance on their new SportsNet LA channel had finished in fast-food failure. Bad enough that this new channel reaches only 30% of Los Angeles. On the first day that would test the effect of the Dodgers' decision to cut a TV deal that has cut out the majority of their fans, the channel reached 0% of me. I tried.
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