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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas E. Coffin, an NBC research director whose groundbreaking studies in the late 1940s demonstrated the effectiveness of television advertising, died May 13 in Stanton, Calif. He was 83. Coffin left a job as a psychology professor at Hofstra University to become NBC's television market research specialist in 1949. He was the first to conduct scientific studies that showed that people bought products after seeing them in television commercials, an unproven concept in TV's early days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before losing the jet lag. The Skinny: I've watched the first four episodes of FX's "Fargo" and can recommend it. Now I want to see the movie again. Seems like Tuesday was light on hard news but we scraped together a Fix for you nonetheless. Today's stories include the latest on L.A. film production and NBC's efforts to build a digital programming space. Also, Oliver North gets to put his experience to work for FX's Cold War drama "The Americans. " Daily Dose: The Washington Post said Comcast's acquisition of Time Warner Cable should be approved by regulators.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can you say "yanked?" That is what Nike did this week to one of its commercials featuring NBA basketball star David Robinson that parodies "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood." In the TV spot for the company's Force line of basketball shoes, Robinson ties his shoes, then looks at the camera and asks: "Can you say, 'Kick some butt?' " The commercial premiered on CBS during the World Series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By David Ng
Norman Yonemoto, a Los Angeles artist who along with his younger brother, Bruce, created innovative video installations that often explored mass media, Hollywood and other forms of pop culture, has died. He was 67. Yonemoto died Friday at his home in Venice. He had been in ill health since suffering a number of strokes, the last of which was in October, said Carole Ann Klonarides, a family representative. Collaborating with his brother for nearly four decades, Yonemoto created video artwork that often appropriated the visual vernacular of Hollywood movies, television and advertising to challenge the viewer's assumptions about the media.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1995 | Debora Vrana, Times staff writer
Century 21 Real Estate Corp. in Irvine has embarked on a new television advertising campaign featuring a soulful rendition of the Bill Withers song, "Lean on Me," sung in the ad by Michael McDonald, formerly of the Doobie Brothers. " 'Lean on Me' will help us convey the message that clients can lean on us for all of their long-term real estate needs," said David Alpert, director of advertising for Century 21 Real Estate Corp.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1997 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To S, V, L and D, add N for nonevent. Media buyers at advertising agencies said Thursday that new program ratings labeling shows for sex, violence, foul language and suggestive dialogue aren't likely to scare many sponsors of successful television shows. Most big national advertisers already screen TV shows for sex and violence before each episode airs and avoid shows they consider unacceptable. These advertisers have stricter standards than the networks, media buyers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
What did it mean? The half-page ad--echoing the tone of loyalty oaths that cowardly television networks made their employees sign during the "Red-scare" frenzy in the decade following World War II--appeared in several hundred newspapers Nov. 4-5. Out of the blue. No explanation. This was the title: "An Open Letter to the American People." This was the text: "Burger King wishes to go on record as supporting traditional American values on television, especially the importance of the family.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Michael Jackson is the $20-million corporate spokesman who won't speak. "Protect me. . . . Don't let them ask me any questions," Jackson whispered Wednesday morning to a top executive from L.A. Gear, moments after the enigmatic pop star told a Hollywood Palladium full of reporters that he was "very happy" to be a part of the L.A. Gear team. By next spring, Jackson will be starring in L.A. Gear commercials. In the meantime he will help design and market a new line of L.A. Gear shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
As the camera pans through a marble room, a statue of a flute player, carved from the same beige marble, sways in time to his own music. As if fulfilling King Midas' dream, the flutist and the other statues in the room turn to gold, glittering in the light. Suddenly, a white ball appears and fills the screen with the familiar brush-stroke logo of The Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994
Another opponent of Sheriff Sherman Block's bid for reelection to a fourth term, Sheriff's Sgt. John R. Stites II, has purchased cable television advertising in an attempt to keep Block from amassing a majority of votes in Tuesday's election and avoiding a runoff. A spokesman for Stites said the purchase totals about $35,000.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
A partnership announced Thursday between the data analyzers who found Americans who might be persuaded to vote for President Obama and the ad creators who successfully pushed them to the polls provides a glimpse of the future of political advertising. The partnership of GMMB, Obama's chief ad creator and buyer, and Civis Analytics, a firm formed by the head of the campaign's data analysis operation, puts in place two elements that the Obama campaign used to great effect to propel him to an easy reelection despite a still-sputtering economy in 2012.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel, after spending heavily on a TV advertising blitz that coincided with the start of early voting, entered the final stretch of the runoff campaign with roughly one-tenth the war chest of rival Eric Garcetti, according to new campaign finance reports. Greuel, the city's controller, also lagged behind Garcetti in fundraising. She reported raising nearly $937,000 in the four weeks ending Saturday and loaning her campaign $100,000, pushing her just past the $1-million mark in documents her campaign filed with the City Ethics Commission late Thursday.
SPORTS
February 19, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
To the victors go the spoils, and in professional sports that includes promotional opportunities. Two NBA teams have more than one player featured in national television advertisements promoting something other than sports coverage or sneakers. One is the defending champion Miami Heat, with reigning MVP LeBron James and nine-time All-Star Dwyane Wade. The other is the Clippers, whose highflying Lob City act has made them among the most entertaining teams in the league, and who are winning at a franchise-record pace for a second consecutive season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Under pressure from some of her own supporters, Proposition 38 proponent Molly Munger said Monday she would take down a television advertisement critical of a tax plan backed by Gov. Jerry Brown on the same ballot. "The ad that's been controversial is not going to be on the air, beginning tomorrow," Munger told a Sacramento television station Monday. The decision came after a week of sparring by the two campaigns. Munger complained that the ads for Brown's Proposition 30 were misleading, while the governor's allies said Munger was sabotaging both measures with a negative campaign.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2012 | By Paul West, Los Angeles Times
CINCINNATI - President Obama long ago seized on Ohio as his top reelection target. He has bombarded it with a larger volume of TV advertising than any other state. And since launching his campaign - in Ohio, not coincidentally - he's given Ohioans more opportunities to hear from him in person than voters in any other battleground. On Wednesday, he returned to the state to frame the election as a choice between policies to benefit the wealthy and those that boost the middle class.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama's sharp turn to the offensive against GOP challenger Mitt Romney last month came at a steep cost: nearly $58 million. That's how much the president's reelection campaign burned through in June as it pounded Romney's business record and personal finances; its relentless television campaign alone cost $38 million, according to campaign finance reports filed Friday with the Federal Election Commission. The expensive barrage came even as Romney and his affiliated party committees outraised Obama and his Democratic Party fundraising partners for the second month in the row, $106 million to $70 million.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2007 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
In the latest sign that Internet companies are stepping up their pursuit of traditional TV advertisers, AOL on Tuesday jumped ahead of network prime-time's annual "upfront" advertising sales season by previewing its own "fall" lineup of programs.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan West holds a piece of paper at arm's length and wrinkles her nose as if the paper stinks. That's how most advertising agencies look at the infomercial, says West, who buys TV time for the medium. "They think it's sleazy. They actually have an attitude." Infomercials--30-minute programs intended mainly to sell a product or service--are the Rodney Dangerfield of television: They get no respect.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2012 | By Meg James and Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK — Spanish-language media giant Univision Communications touted something that its English-language broadcast rivals cannot: Prime-time ratings at its flagship TV network, Univision, have grown 7% during the current season. Ratings gains in an era of shrinking TV audiences are uncommon as major broadcasters struggle to maintain their standing. Cable channels, social media and advances in technology — including digital video recorders — continue to nibble away at viewership, particularly among younger audiences.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Rick Santorum said Thursday that he ended his presidential bid because he ran out of money, his campaign was in debt and he would have been unable to air any advertising in Pennsylvania. “Money isn't everything in politics, but you do have to have enough to be successful and we were reaching a point where we were frankly not in the position,” Santorum said in his first interview since suspending his campaign Tuesday, on the "Today's Issues" show on the American Family Radio Network.
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