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Television Advertising

NEWS
October 20, 1992
TV advertising is just beginning to catch on in Russia. And no wonder. Ads exist to create a demand. There's always been a demand in Russia; it's the supply that's been lacking. Now that imported brand-name goods are making their way into kiosks and newly privatized stores and Russian firms are spreading their wings, advertising is again an option. But most struggling entrepreneurs find the cost of television advertising prohibitive.
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NEWS
May 31, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the realm of political advertising, the phrase "free TV" has become the rallying cry for a growing number of members of Congress who want to limit the enormous cost of political campaigns. Indeed, since Senate Democrats and Republicans recently began negotiations on a bipartisan bill to reform the nation's political campaign system, the issue of television advertising has proven to be the only aspect of the debate on which members of both parties can agree.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
With tobacco lobbyists backing off, legislative negotiators quietly sealed an agreement Wednesday on a $1.5-billion bill to spend Proposition 99 tobacco tax revenues for a variety of health and other programs, including an anti-smoking advertising campaign bitterly opposed by cigarette companies. Senate Republican Leader Ken Maddy of Fresno had indicated on Tuesday that he would press for an amendment sought by tobacco companies to pull $28.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | BILL STALL and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Mel Levine uncloaks his "stealth" candidacy for the U.S. Senate today with the beginning of a multimillion-dollar television ad campaign designed to boost him from a black hole in the opinion polls to victory in the primary election in just 63 days.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to capitalize on voter skepticism about campaign promises, alcoholic beverage interests began Tuesday spending $1 million on television advertising that attempts to link a beer, wine and liquor tax hike proposal with pledges made in the successful 1984 effort to pass a state lottery. In one advertisement, a teacher looks into the camera and says, "Remember those promises about all that lottery money for schools? I wonder where it all went.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2007 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
A group of national cable television networks on Thursday abruptly pulled out of an experimental program that sought to use EBay Inc.'s auction expertise and technology to buy and sell TV time. Several big ad agencies and major advertisers including Home Depot Inc., Toyota Motor Corp. and Intel Corp. hired EBay last summer to create an "online media marketplace" for television ads. The companies had hoped to introduce an efficient, and perhaps lower-cost, tool for selling commercial time.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For years, television advertising has been blamed for driving up the cost of political campaigns--particularly for members of the Senate, who believe they must spend millions of dollars to be reelected. Now there is strong evidence that television is not the culprit.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1999 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Less than a year ago, Billy Blanks was a $70-an-hour personal trainer with a growing celebrity clientele--not exactly a rare job description in Los Angeles. Today, thanks to the power of video and an oft-aired TV infomercial, Blanks is on the verge of becoming the most popular fitness guru since Jane Fonda.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The following letter arrived recently, signed by Barbara Young and seven other "Ladies of the Office." The tone was anger. As other office ladies were watching a "soap" during lunch, several commercials ran for yeast infections and feminine products (including one that asked if we ruin our panties every month when we get our period), and I thought to myself about commercials I have seen very recently regarding birth control protection for women, particularly sponge or foam products.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Long on efforts to shock but short on ads, Geraldo Rivera's NBC special on Satanism went to ratings heaven, national audience estimates from A.C. Nielsen Co. showed Wednesday. "Devil Worship: Exposing Satan's Underground" won its two-hour time period Tuesday night with a 21.9 rating and a 33 share of audience--meaning it was seen in about 19.8 million homes, one-third of the number that were watching TV between 8 and 10 p.m.
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