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NEWS
June 19, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Sunday morning and the face on the television screen is just short of angelic. A middle-aged, ex-altar boy grins and welcomes viewers from more than 3 million sleepy households to NBC's "Meet the Press." Amenities done, the face changes. Eyebrows arch, the mouth tightens and the apple cheeks sour into "the weekend pit bull," as one reviewer has called him. Or "Sunday's top inquisitor," as another columnist opined. This is Timothy J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014
Larry D. Mann Canadian character actor, TV announcer Larry D. Mann, 91, a veteran actor who voiced Yukon Cornelius in the animated Christmas favorite "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," died of age-related causes Monday in Los Angeles, said his son, Richard Mann. Mann, a Canadian-born actor and TV announcer, played the role of the hearty prospector in the Christmas TV special first broadcast in 1964. Since the 1950s, Mann did voice work for other animated shows, had small roles in movies, including "The Sting" and "In the Heat of the Night," and appeared in dozens of TV series including "Gunsmoke," "Bewitched" and "Hill Street Blues.
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SPORTS
September 9, 1993
The Mighty Ducks announced three-quarters of their radio and television broadcast teams Wednesday. Chris Madsen, who was recently with SportsChannel Chicago, will be the team's play-by-play announcer for KCAL-TV (Channel 9). Matt McConnell, who will do the radio play-by-play, has seven years of hockey broadcasting experience, including stints with the Michigan State Spartans and the Flint Spirits and Peoria Rivermen of the International Hockey League.
WORLD
December 19, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Trains stopped running. Markets closed. In at least one city, officials urged people to get off the streets and soldiers were everywhere. It is rarely easy to find out what's happening inside North Korea. On the cold Monday when officials announced the death of "Dear Leader" Kim Jong Il, the few reports trickling out of the country indicated that the country of 24 million people shut down for a time. No signs of unrest were reported. But faced with making the transition to Kim's largely untested young son, the power structure appeared to be taking no chances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1996
The California Highway Patrol's annual Chips for Kids Toy Drive is being aided this year by a series of KTTV/Fox Television public service announcements. "Fox News at 10" and "Good Day L.A." will provide regular updates of the campaign collection efforts. People are encouraged to donate new, unwrapped toys at the Northridge Fashion Square, the Montebello Towne Center, Plaza at West Covina, Knott's Berry Farm and CHP area offices through Christmas Day.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
Former professional wrestler Robert "Gorilla Monsoon" Marella, one of the most beloved villains of the ring who became a television announcer for the World Wrestling Federation, has died at the age of 62. Marella, who had suffered from diabetes and heart problems in recent years, died Wednesday at his home in this Philadelphia suburb, where he had been a longtime resident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000
Bob "Shamrock" Shannon, 79, longtime radio and television announcer. Shannon began working as a radio announcer in his hometown of West Allis, Wis., in 1938, while he was still in high school. He got his big break at WTMJ in Milwaukee announcing for Heinie and the Grenadiers, a locally well-known polka band. He came to Hollywood after military service in World War II and was a CBS network announcer in the late 1940s.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | DAVID E. BRADY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wendell Niles, a veteran radio and television announcer who worked with such performers as Bob Hope, George Burns and Milton Berle, has died at his San Fernando Valley home. He was 89. A Toluca Lake resident for 55 years, Niles died Monday of cancer, said his son, Wendell Niles Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Jay Stewart, the announcer of the long-running television game show "Let's Make a Deal," died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his Hollywood home, police said Monday Police Detective Russell Kuster said the 71-year-old Stewart, whose real name was Jay Fix, shot himself in the head Sunday outside the garage of his Grace Street residence. An explanatory note and a last will and testament was discovered in his possession, Kuster said.
SPORTS
April 7, 2003 | GRAHAME L. JONES
They wired Mia Hamm for sound on Saturday. Unfortunately, they did the same for Ty Keough. OK, so that's a bit of a cheap shot, but there is only so much dull even the hardiest of television soccer viewers can stand. Cheerleading is bad enough, but claptrap is worse. Fortunately, help is on the way. The most encouraging news to emerge from the Major League Soccer and Women's United Soccer Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2011
Leo Kirch German media mogul Leo Kirch, 84, who turned his one-man film distribution company into Germany's second-biggest media business before losing control of it after a gamble on pay television, died Thursday in Munich. His family did not give the cause, but Kirch had suffered from diabetes and near-blindness for several years. At its height, Kirch's media group was valued at $5 billion. It held Germany's biggest film-licensing library, the nation's only pay-television channel and rights to two World Cup soccer tournaments.
SPORTS
April 5, 2011 | By Broderick Turner
The Lakers would not comment on media reports that team television play-by-play announcer Joel Meyers will be replaced by radio play-by-play announcer Spero Dedes at the end of the season. Dedes would become the third Lakers television announcer since the death of Hall of Famer Chick Hearn. Paul Sunderland took over for Hearn after Hearn's death in August 2002. "All of our announcers are under contract and we're not going to discuss that situation until the end of the season," said Lakers vice president of public relations John Black.
WORLD
March 10, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The glittering fireworks show burst into a thunderous ending. The cheering in the soccer stadium died down. A crowd of mostly young men enduring a chilly Wednesday night to rally in support of Moammar Kadafi's claimed victory over the rebels of this town scrambled to collect their reward: truckloads of free rice, pasta, milk, sodas and vegetable oil handed out from waiting military vehicles. They hauled off their bounty with at least as much enthusiasm as they had shown minutes earlier for their leader, whose forces have for weeks been fighting rebels for control of this city of 210,000 people.
WORLD
February 11, 2011 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Los Angeles Times
Less than 24 hours after a patronizing speech in which he insisted he wouldn't resign, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak fled his palace by helicopter and left it to his newly appointed vice president to tell the nation he had turned power over to the military. The dramatic end to Mubarak's 30 years in power came after a day of widespread confusion over who really ruled Egypt, and massive demonstrations that spread far from Cairo's central Tahrir Square, the nerve center of the protests for more than two weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
KCET-TV has already made clear that it will no longer be telling children how to get to "Sesame Street. " But that's not the only kiddie fare that the public- television station is relinquishing once it assumes its new guise as an independent channel on Saturday. Gone will be the furry friends of "Curious George," the scientific principles of "Sid the Science Kid" and the wacky adventures of "Clifford the Big Red Dog. " Ditto "Dinosaur Train," "Martha Speaks," "Super Why!" and "The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!"
SPORTS
September 30, 2010 | Wire reports
LeBron James said he thinks race played a factor in the backlash to his nationally televised announcement that he was signing with the Miami Heat. He first made the comments in a CNN interview that aired Wednesday, then reiterated his feelings after the Heat's practice Thursday. James has been criticized for announcing that he would leave the Cavaliers for Miami in July in an hourlong ESPN special called "The Decision," with some accusing him of letting his ego get away from him. Asked if race was a factor in the fallout, James told CNN's Soledad O'Brien in the interview, which was conducted Monday, "I think so, at times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
KCET-TV has already made clear that it will no longer be telling children how to get to "Sesame Street. " But that's not the only kiddie fare that the public- television station is relinquishing once it assumes its new guise as an independent channel on Saturday. Gone will be the furry friends of "Curious George," the scientific principles of "Sid the Science Kid" and the wacky adventures of "Clifford the Big Red Dog. " Ditto "Dinosaur Train," "Martha Speaks," "Super Why!" and "The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
Roy Rowan, 78, a radio and television announcer who introduced all of the Lucille Ball shows. Born in Paw Paw, Mich., Rowan attended Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo and began his announcing career at radio station WKZO there, working with Ralph Story, Paul Harvey and Harry Carry. Rowan moved on to radio stations in Schenectady and Buffalo, N.Y., and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles to work for CBS Radio and later CBS Television.
SPORTS
April 22, 2009 | DIANE PUCIN
Eric Collins did a week of practice games with Dodgers television partner Steve Lyons. They went into a booth at Dodger Stadium last week and pretended as if they were on television calling balls and strikes, making conversation, telling little stories, doing a broadcast. And Collins worked the clubhouse. He introduced himself to each Dodger. He wanted for them to know him. "I'm the guy who's going to be talking about them on television this season," Collins said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2009 | Lee Margulies
Six local students were among the first-place winners of the 30th annual College Television Awards, handed out Saturday night by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation. Julie Sagalowsky and Josh C. Feldman of UCLA won in the comedy category for "Lucy: A Period Piece," about a teenager aching for puberty, while Daniel M. Harrich of the American Film Institute in L.A. captured top drama honors for "Acholiland," about a United Nations worker in Uganda.
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