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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
Karen Fulte sat amid photos, books and other items related to Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, a pioneer of television who made the nation his pulpit. But collecting memorabilia was not her goal. She was looking for stories about people whose lives had been deeply influenced by the late Roman Catholic teacher -- provable testimonials tinged with enough divine influence to persuade the church to name Sheen a saint. What she needs is a miracle.
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BUSINESS
January 3, 2003 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Three of the nation's top television networks urged the federal government Thursday to scrap all remaining media-ownership rules, which they said are no longer needed to spur competition among broadcasters and ensure diversity on television. In a lengthy filing with the Federal Communications Commission, Fox Entertainment, NBC and Viacom Inc.
SPORTS
June 2, 2002
Giving its isolated populace a rare glimpse of rival South Korea, North Korea on Saturday broadcast the World Cup match played by Senegal and France in Seoul. The delayed showing of the Friday match, which Senegal won, 1-0, was one of the first known broadcasts of scenes from the South in North Korea, possibly the world's most closed society. The North's reclusive communist regime has had no diplomatic ties with the South since the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended without a peace treaty.
SPORTS
January 30, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone has his own story, Jim McKay is saying, and that's what makes the Olympics so great, so different from every other sporting enterprise. There is, for instance, the tale of Billy Fiske, the first American killed in World War II, who was a star rider in the 1930s at the Cresta Run in St. Moritz, Switzerland, where the sport of skeleton--a sort of head-first luge--was developed. And there is Eddie the Eagle, the low-flying Brit at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephen K. Nenno, a Los Angeles broadcast executive who became vice president of program operations for ABC Television and a mentor to other broadcasters, has died. He was 59. Nenno, who had held his post since 1994, died July 30 of cancer at New York Presbyterian Hospital. He had lived in New York for 30 years. Throughout his radio and television management career, Nenno worked to bring the best and brightest into his business and retain them.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viacom Inc. is exploring the possibility of acquiring Telemundo Communications Group Inc., the nation's second-largest Spanish-language television broadcaster, according to three sources close to the companies. The talks are very preliminary, these sources say, although the companies have exchanged certain information in recent weeks.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day, nearly 200 television stations across the country pump out hour after hour of crystal-clear programming that virtually no one can watch. This is the state of digital broadcasting, the biggest innovation in television since the introduction of color in 1953. Despite a federal mandate to switch to clearer, more vibrant digital broadcasts, fewer than one in 1,000 homes is equipped to tune in.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | DAN MORAIN and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After spending months voicing opposition to electricity rate hikes, Gov. Gray Davis acknowledged to a statewide television audience Thursday night the need for an increase that would average 26.5%. Calling the upheaval in California's deregulated electricity market a "crisis" for the first time, Davis enumerated steps he has taken, then said he has fought "tooth and nail against raising rates."
BUSINESS
December 6, 2000 | From Reuters
USA Networks Inc. plans to sell or form a joint venture for its 13 TV stations by Jan. 1, ending speculation USA might acquire other companies to bolster the station group, which some financial analysts consider untenable on its own. USA Chief Executive Barry Diller told reporters and investors about his intentions for the group of mostly UHF stations during an investor conference Monday in New York, said USA Networks spokeswoman Adrienne Becker.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2000 | ROBERT MARICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the U.S., it would be unthinkable to see PBS pay up for the right to air the Super Bowl or that the publicly funded network would outbid NBC for the Olympics. But in Europe, state-run public TV channels not only have historically broadcast the Olympics, but also the wildly popular World Cup soccer tournament and a steady stream of blockbuster Hollywood movies. And they've spent heavily on this costly programming. The day of reckoning may be near, however.
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