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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The film and television industry in Los Angeles County has lost more than 16,000 jobs since 2004, mostly due to work migrating out of state, a new report revealed. Last year, the film and television business generated 102,100 jobs in the county, down 14% from its peak of 118,200 jobs in 2004, according to a study released Friday by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. During the same period, L.A.'s share of overall jobs in the motion picture and video category fell to 51% from 60%. (The figures exclude employment in the music and post-production industries.)
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Confronting a case that could reshape the television broadcast industry, Supreme Court justices sounded conflicted Tuesday over whether an upstart streaming service is violating copyright laws by enabling subscribers to record programs captured over the air and view them later on the Internet. The court's ruling, due by June, could either shut down New York-based Aereo or clear the way for the growing company to continue providing subscribers with a convenient, low-cost way to watch local broadcast channels without paying for cable or satellite service or putting an antenna on a roof.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
As the ties between Hollywood and China continue to deepen, organizers plan to bring a first-of-its-kind entertainment industry convention to Los Angeles this fall. The U.S. China Film & TV Industry Expo, aimed at broadening business relationships between film and TV producers in the U.S. and China, will hold its inaugural event Sept. 15 and 16 at the L.A. Convention Center. The expo will include exhibitors from the U.S. and China and will feature panels bringing together filmmakers and entertainment industry executives from both countries to discuss such topics as navigating China's bureaucracy and forming co-production deals.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the television industry, under pressure from Congress and parents' groups, has agreed to rate its programs according to potentially offensive levels of sex, violence, foul language and even sexually suggestive dialogue, congressional and industry sources said Wednesday. Although some details remained to be worked out, the agreement was expected to be unveiled formally today at a White House press conference led by Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno called on the entertainment industry Wednesday to reduce television violence voluntarily but she warned that, if further steps are not taken soon, "government action will be imperative." Appearing before the Senate Commerce Committee, Reno stressed that her preference is for voluntary industry action and she commended television executives for adopting guidelines discouraging gratuitous violence and calling for parental advisory labels for some programs.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A new kind of television, called high-definition TV, will be on the market in the near future offering a sharper picture, a movielike rectangular screen--and a threat to U.S. leadership in communications. Those who have seen the new system, even U.S. broadcasters who are worried about its impact, are uniformly impressed. "It's an extremely interesting technology, with tremendous potential," says Jeffrey Baumann, a Washington representative of the National Assn. of Broadcasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1994 | JEFF KRAMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wearing come-hither smiles and rose-colored sunglasses, representatives from Thailand to Pittsburgh descended on Santa Monica last week, hoping to snatch a piece of L.A.'s signature film and television industry. They had their work cut out for them. Anyone venturing outside the annual location expo quickly encountered the sparkling Pacific Ocean, temperatures approaching 80 degrees and maybe even a celebrity or two.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the leading companies in the television industry--among them Tele-Communications Inc., Time Warner Inc., Paramount Communications and Turner Broadcasting Systems--are engaged in a complex series of overlapping discussions whose outcome could reshape the communications business. The talks, which involve reconfiguring assets and teaming sometime-competitors in new alliances, are part of a strategic scramble for competitive advantages in the coming era of 500-channel programming options.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA
Stacy and Scotty Williams of Corona stand dutifully beside their mother at Kids Hollywood Connection, a Newport Beach company that helps local youngsters secure Hollywood agents. By just looking, you would never guess that 8-year-old Stacy, with her hair in braids and a sprinkle of freckles across her nose, raked in $70,000 last year and is currently the hit of a Kellogg's Raisin Bran commercial in which she sits at a breakfast table eating cereal with her dad.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The broadcasting industry's top lobbyist said the Federal Communications Commission needs to work closer with the industry rather than trying to undermine it through regulatory measures that favor would-be competitors. "Over the past five years, there has been an increasingly singular focus by the federal government on broadband," said National Assn. of Broadcasters President and Chief Executive Gordon Smith in a Monday speech at the association's annual convention in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Meg James and Joe Flint
Walt Disney Co. and satellite TV provider Dish Network's sweeping new agreement could lead to changes in the way consumers watch television. The comprehensive distribution deal, announced late Monday, is expected to become a blueprint on how the television industry treats the increasingly important digital rights for valuable programming. Dish secured Internet streaming rights for content from Disney's ESPN, ESPN2, ABC Family and Disney Channel as well as the eight ABC television stations that Disney owns.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Hollywood still isn't reflecting the nation's diversity in its entertainment products, and that omission is costing the industry considerable amounts in lost revenues. That's the main conclusion of a comprehensive report about diversity in the film and TV industry released Wednesday by UCLA's Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies. The study, which is titled "2014 Hollywood Diversity Report: Making Sense of the Disconnect," finds that minorities and women are represented far below their corresponding percentages in the general population.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Visual effects artists are planning to show their colors next week when President Obama visits DreamWorks Animation SKG. Hundreds of visual effects artists who work at the Glendale studio are expected to wear green T-shirts to draw attention to the plight of their industry when Obama visits the campus Tuesday as part of a fundraising trip to the West Coast. At least that's the plan of a group of visual effects workers who have been trying to combat the effect of tax breaks and foreign subsidies on California's beleaguered visual effects industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Meg James
Cord-cutting continues to nibble away at the U.S. pay-TV industry. According to a SNL Kagan report released Tuesday, the industry suffered a net loss of 217,000 subscribers in the second quarter of this year compared to the same period last year. The report also showed that traditional cable companies -- including Time Warner Cable -- are losing more subscribers to satellite and telecommunications competitors that also offer video service. The report illustrated why Time Warner Cable had little choice but to settle its contentious dispute with CBS Corp., which led to a monthlong blackout of CBS-owned stations in Los Angeles, New York and Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The consolidation of the television industry continued Monday with Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group striking a $985-million deal to acquire Allbritton Communications, owner of seven television stations. For Sinclair, this is the second major acquisition it has made in this year. In April, it bought Fisher Communications Inc., owner of 20 television stations, for $373 million. Allbritton's biggest assets are WJLA-TV, the ABC affiliate in Washington, D.C., and NewsChannel 8, an all-news cable station serving the nation's capital.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television industry, dogged by growing public criticism of the TV ratings system that it will unveil today, plans to put its scheme into practice next month even before government regulators have had time to finish reviewing it. A spokeswoman for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, which coordinated development of the system, said that the four major television networks would announce each show's rating immediately before its broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
As more options for TV viewing emerge, and watching programming on smartphones and tablets becomes more popular, there's more pressure on cable and satellite companies to let consumers choose what channels they want to pay for. Some see such an "a la carte" system as the future of the pay-TV industry, arguing that it would be more fair for consumers. But according to Laura Martin, an analyst at Needham & Co., such a move would be a disaster for the business.   PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings If the pay-TV industry undid the practice, known as bundling, it would lose about $70 billion, or half its revenue, annually, she said.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
With the cost of cable TV on the rise, cord-cutters are taking matters into their own hands and opting for streaming services such as Netflix that are far less expensive than traditional TV cable packages. I too am this close to canceling my exorbitant cable bill, but every time I'm about to make the call, I read an argument like this one, “ Sen. McCain's 'a la carte' cable could kill TV diversity ,” and I just can't do it. That doesn't mean that I don't also pay for streaming services.
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