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Television Industry England

ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if they needed a reminder, officials at Orange County public-TV station KOCE Channel 50 are learning once again just how popular the BBC series "East-Enders" is. More than 1,000 loyal viewers of the weekly soap about working-class Londoners have called KOCE since the station announced it will skip over nearly 200 episodes because of a technical wrangle over residual rights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | BART MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ad is a beguilingly soft sell. A tall, beautiful Englishwoman knocks on a door to borrow some instant coffee from the dishy man next door. It looks like the beginning of a sexy dramatic encounter, but it ends after just 45 seconds. Several months later, Episode 2 appears. The upscale lady is returning the coffee she borrowed. Electricity again surges across the doorstep. Sadly, the man can't invite her in. He's already enjoying coffee with Another Woman.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several American entertainment giants, including NBC, Walt Disney Co. and Time Warner's Home Box Office, emerged Wednesday as competitors in the multibillion-dollar bidding war for lucrative commercial television franchises in Britain. The U.S. companies, all participating as part of consortia formed specifically to seek the 10-year Independent Television licenses, were among the dozens of entrants plunging into the murky waters of the British ITV franchising system.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Throughout two decades in power, Brazil's military regime enforced strict political censorship in the media. But the ruling generals never placed restrictions on the nation's sex-film industry. As a result, from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, some of Brazil's most talented filmmakers made soft-core porn movies with underlying political messages as a means of subverting the military leadership.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN and JEFF KAYE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
British Sky Broadcasting, the satellite TV company formed last year by the merger of Rupert Murdoch's Sky TV and its rival, British Satellite Broadcasting, is trying to dig itself out of a financial crisis by renegotiating hundreds of millions of dollars in programming contracts with several Hollywood studios. The efforts come at a difficult time for BSkyB, as the merged company is now called.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The quasi-governmental agency that regulates the British TV industry announced Friday that it was terminating its contract with British Satellite Broadcasting, the company that merged two weeks ago with Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television. And, in a remarkably frosty tone, the Independent Broadcasting Authority also warned that regulators will soon have the power to prohibit the new British Sky Broadcasting from transmitting in Britain.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlywed satellite networks Sky Television and British Satellite Broadcasting were planning how to consolidate their programming and business operations Monday as a political outcry against their merger began to swell. "We have people down at BSB looking at programming, contracts--everything," said Sky spokeswoman Fiona Waters. With Rupert Murdoch's Sky losing $4 million a week and BSB losing nearly four times that, the deal comes as a relief for both companies.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After losing a combined $2.4 billion, Britain's rival satellite television networks announced Friday that they will merge, ending a bitter and expensive battle for market domination. Rupert Murdoch's Sky Television will join with British Satellite Broadcasting, which is owned primarily by a consortium of European media companies. The new joint venture will be controlled 50-50 by Murdoch's News International and BSB's principal shareholders, Granada Television Ltd.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
Accompanied by a bouncy theme song, the opening credits roll past a photograph of an old Berlin apartment building. Action. Apartment interior: Adolf Hitler walks in the front door to a burst of applause from the studio audience. He gives the Nazi salute and shouts the show's title. "Heil Honey, I'm Home!" So goes the opening of a British sitcom about the domestic life of Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun and a couple of happy-go-lucky Jews next door.
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