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Television Industry England

ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Astute television viewers may be familiar with the logo of Thames Television, a sketch of London riverfront landmarks encompassing St. Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge and Parliament. A larger number of viewers have watched Thames programming without realizing it. From the documentary series "The World at War" to the regal story of "Edward and Mrs.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British TV viewers are going to get a dash of Disney with their morning bowl of Weetabix as a result of new commercial television franchises awarded here Wednesday. Sunrise Television, a consortium that includes Walt Disney Co. Ltd. and several British media companies, won the lucrative contract to broadcast a commercial breakfast-time program across Britain, seven days a week. The license covers a 10-year period starting Jan. 1, 1993.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | JEFF KAYE and JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
British Sky Broadcasting PLC, the London-based satellite TV service formed last year by the merger of rival ventures Sky Television and British Satellite Broadcasting, appears to be close to winning some concessions from three Hollywood studios for its costly program contracts. According to sources in London, BSkyB has negotiated cheaper contracts with Sony Entertainment's Columbia Pictures division, Warner Bros. and Disney's Touchstone Pictures unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
An American evangelist who picked up the pieces of Jim and Tammy Bakker's television empire has been told he cannot work miracles on British television. The weekly "miracle healing" episode of "Victory With Morris Cerullo" was pulled last week from Super Channel after the Independent Television Commission expressed concern. The channel has 23 million viewers across Europe. Regulators say the program violates British standards because miracles cannot be proved.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if they needed a reminder, officials at Orange County public TV station KOCE Channel 50 are learning once again just how popular the BBC series "EastEnders" is. More than 1,000 loyal viewers of the weekly soap about working-class Londoners have called KOCE since the station announced it will skip over nearly 200 episodes because of a technical wrangle over residual rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if they needed a reminder, officials at Orange County public-TV station KOCE Channel 50 are learning once again just how popular the BBC series "East-Enders" is. More than 1,000 loyal viewers of the weekly soap about working-class Londoners have called KOCE since the station announced it will skip over nearly 200 episodes because of a technical wrangle over residual rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | BART MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ad is a beguilingly soft sell. A tall, beautiful Englishwoman knocks on a door to borrow some instant coffee from the dishy man next door. It looks like the beginning of a sexy dramatic encounter, but it ends after just 45 seconds. Several months later, Episode 2 appears. The upscale lady is returning the coffee she borrowed. Electricity again surges across the doorstep. Sadly, the man can't invite her in. He's already enjoying coffee with Another Woman.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several American entertainment giants, including NBC, Walt Disney Co. and Time Warner's Home Box Office, emerged Wednesday as competitors in the multibillion-dollar bidding war for lucrative commercial television franchises in Britain. The U.S. companies, all participating as part of consortia formed specifically to seek the 10-year Independent Television licenses, were among the dozens of entrants plunging into the murky waters of the British ITV franchising system.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Throughout two decades in power, Brazil's military regime enforced strict political censorship in the media. But the ruling generals never placed restrictions on the nation's sex-film industry. As a result, from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, some of Brazil's most talented filmmakers made soft-core porn movies with underlying political messages as a means of subverting the military leadership.
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