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Television Industry Finances

ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS' broadcast tonight of the film "Age-Old Friends," a sentimental look at the relationship between two aging retirees played by Hume Cronyn and Vincent Gardenia, quietly marks a dramatic development in the network television business. "Age-Old Friends" was not developed by CBS as a movie-of-the-week, nor was it produced as a feature film that ran first in movie theaters--the two most common ways movies find their way to prime-time network television.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1999 | STEVE METCALF, HARTFORD COURANT
The tune is familiar--it's the one now known throughout the civilized world as "Hello Mudduh, Hello Faddah." But the words, sung by a reedy, painfully earnest male voice, are new: "People always try to please you, People always hug and squeeze you, When you're little, life's exciting, So the thought of growing up becomes inviting." At first blush, this sounds like a bad joke, or somebody's wicked little parody.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
When the Public Broadcasting Service trims its children's series "Wonderworks" to once a month instead of once a week this fall, the move will be more than just a routine cutback. The change, made at the behest of PBS programming chief Jennifer Lawson, signals a new era for public television, one in which a single executive controls decisions that were once made by a consortium of public stations and their officers, and in which Hollywood, prime time and ratings are no longer dirty words.
SPORTS
October 24, 1987
The National Football League has reimbursed the three major television networks an undisclosed amount for some of the revenue lost in the 24-day players' strike, a league spokesman said Friday. Newsday reported that ABC, CBS and NBC had received $6 million each, and that the league would give back $60 million to the networks over the next two seasons to make up for the one missed weekend of play, the reduced ratings and the decline of advertising.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the average TV viewer, it might be hard to comprehend a prime-time schedule that requires choosing between "NYPD Blue" and "Law & Order," sets quiz shows "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" and "Weakest Link" against each other in several time zones and places "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and its spinoff, "Angel," not only on different nights but on different channels. The best way to analyze decision-making in television these days, however, boils down to a simple phrase: Follow the money.
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