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Television Industry Finances

ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1999 | STEVE METCALF, HARTFORD COURANT
The tune is familiar--it's the one now known throughout the civilized world as "Hello Mudduh, Hello Faddah." But the words, sung by a reedy, painfully earnest male voice, are new: "People always try to please you, People always hug and squeeze you, When you're little, life's exciting, So the thought of growing up becomes inviting." At first blush, this sounds like a bad joke, or somebody's wicked little parody.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
When the Public Broadcasting Service trims its children's series "Wonderworks" to once a month instead of once a week this fall, the move will be more than just a routine cutback. The change, made at the behest of PBS programming chief Jennifer Lawson, signals a new era for public television, one in which a single executive controls decisions that were once made by a consortium of public stations and their officers, and in which Hollywood, prime time and ratings are no longer dirty words.
SPORTS
October 24, 1987
The National Football League has reimbursed the three major television networks an undisclosed amount for some of the revenue lost in the 24-day players' strike, a league spokesman said Friday. Newsday reported that ABC, CBS and NBC had received $6 million each, and that the league would give back $60 million to the networks over the next two seasons to make up for the one missed weekend of play, the reduced ratings and the decline of advertising.
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