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Television Industry Labor Relations

BUSINESS
March 15, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER and
The Federal Communications Commission, responding to congressional pressure for action on a key media industry issue, launched a formal proceeding to consider changes in the "financial interest and syndication" rules that keep television networks from owning the programs they air.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Despite its "strike-proof" fall plans to air the Summer Olympic Games and the World Series instead of new entertainment programming, NBC would have been hit the hardest of the three networks if the Writers Guild of America strike had not reached a tentative end last week, the network's president and chief executive officer Robert C. Wright says. Although entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff, as well as other TV industry observers, have said No.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1988 | LOUIS CHUNOVIC
After five months of often bitter feuding, officials from the two sides of the Writers Guild of America strike expressed a measure of sympathy for one another during a joint appearance at a news conference Friday. Herb Steinberg, spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, exhorted out-of-town TV critics and reporters to take greater notice of the contributions of writers, calling their anonymity a "terrible frustration."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Dissident members of the striking Writers Guild of America held off their expected return to work because of what they called a "hopeful" conversation Monday with guild leader Brian Walton. Walton advised the group, known as the Writers Coalition, to wait 36 hours before taking any step, individuals familiar with the conversation said. Both Walton and the dissidents declined to comment.
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