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August 10, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet television is showing a documentary about a relatively little-known episode in California history. The story of Ft. Ross, from 1812 to 1841 Russia's most remote outpost, describes a settlement of soldiers, farmers and fur hunters on a lonely stretch of the rugged Sonoma County coast 100 miles northwest of San Francisco. A Soviet TV crew was here several months ago to film the documentary about the country's California connection at the 19th-Century fort. "The filming of the Ft.
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NEWS
December 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Russia's TV6 television station, widely considered the last bastion of independence on the country's airwaves, won a major court battle Saturday to stay in business. A Moscow arbitration court canceled earlier rulings to liquidate the company and ordered further hearings, said Tatiana Blinova, a spokeswoman for TV6. The station had faced liquidation after a minority shareholder brought a bankruptcy case against it on accusations that it failed to earn a profit.
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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian media magnate who lost the jewels of his empire but won his freedom in the past few days declared his independent national television network dead Thursday and said he will sell his share to the highest bidder. Once the energy company Gazprom wrested control of NTV last weekend, tycoon Vladimir A. Gusinsky said, the network lost its identity. Sevodnya, the flagship daily newspaper of Gusinsky's Media-Most company, was shut down Monday.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exiled Russian businessman Boris A. Berezovsky announced Monday that he is handing control of his TV6 station to a group of journalists known for their critical approach to the authorities. The journalists had been key figures at NTV, flagship station of the Media-Most empire, which had rankled the Kremlin with its reporting. Media-Most owner Vladimir A. Gusinsky was forced to flee Russia last summer after authorities filed fraud charges against him.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
The new chairman of Russia's only independent TV network faced down angry journalists Thursday, dismissing their fears that he might undermine media freedom and insisting that his only goal is to turn a profit. "You can't charge a person with a crime that he hasn't yet committed," said Alfred Kokh, who orchestrated the hostile takeover of Russia's combative NTV network earlier this week. "We haven't quashed freedom of speech, and we don't plan to do so."
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Talks about the future of Russia's only independent nationwide television network crumbled as representatives of the state-run gas company Gazprom rejected a proposal to ask the Supreme Court to determine the legitimacy of its takeover of NTV. NTV insists that Gazprom--the largest shareholder--illegally put its loyalists on the network's board, and its journalists have refused to work for the new leadership.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
The self-proclaimed new managers of NTV, Russia's only nationwide independent television network, today changed the security guards, fired journalists who rejected their authority and took the station off the air in the midst of the morning news broadcast. The first real sign of the impact of the seizure of NTV's airwaves came at 8:06 a.m., when anchor Andrei Norkin was cut off in midsentence as he attempted to explain what had happened when the new managers arrived.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exiled Russian businessman Boris A. Berezovsky announced Monday that he is handing control of his TV6 station to a group of journalists known for their critical approach to the authorities. The journalists had been key figures at NTV, flagship station of the Media-Most empire, which had rankled the Kremlin with its reporting. Media-Most owner Vladimir A. Gusinsky was forced to flee Russia last summer after authorities filed fraud charges against him.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ted Turner has been many things--media visionary, multibillionaire magnate, self-appointed rescuer of the United Nations and ambassador for his own private foreign policy. Now he's considering adding "defender of Russian press freedom" to his resume. It might just turn out to be his hardest gig.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia's two biggest television channels resumed limited broadcasting in Moscow after a three-day blackout caused by a fire at the country's main Ostankino television tower. RTR state television and ORT public television went on the air from a temporary transmitter fixed to the trunk of the fire-ravaged 1,772-foot tower. RTR and ORT combined their programs as the transmitter allows broadcasting on only one frequency.
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Dealing another blow to Media-Most, a Russian court ordered the liquidation of the independent media group in response to a suit by tax authorities, a court spokesman said. Media-Most has already lost its flagship NTV television channel to a takeover by state-linked gas company Gazprom. The gas company also took control of and then closed Media-Most's Sevodnya daily newspaper and fired the staff of its Itogi newsmagazine. Tycoon Vladimir A.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian media magnate who lost the jewels of his empire but won his freedom in the past few days declared his independent national television network dead Thursday and said he will sell his share to the highest bidder. Once the energy company Gazprom wrested control of NTV last weekend, tycoon Vladimir A. Gusinsky said, the network lost its identity. Sevodnya, the flagship daily newspaper of Gusinsky's Media-Most company, was shut down Monday.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seizing Russia's only independent national television network, energy giant Gazprom has moved swiftly to dismantle two related publications that were critical of the Kremlin. Amid grim days for media freedom in Russia, journalists from the liberal Itogi weekly newsmagazine were locked out and fired Tuesday, a day after the partially state-owned Gazprom joined forces with the head of the Sem Dney publishing house to shut down a leading newspaper, Sevodnya.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Management insisted that it was a normal, "very orderly" corporate takeover. But journalists who resigned en masse Saturday from Russia's NTV network saw the change at the top as a naked power play by the Kremlin to muzzle the country's most outspoken news broadcaster. After months of legal wrangling, the state-run utility giant Gazprom finally got control of Russia's only private nationwide television network.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
The self-proclaimed new managers of NTV, Russia's only nationwide independent television network, today changed the security guards, fired journalists who rejected their authority and took the station off the air in the midst of the morning news broadcast. The first real sign of the impact of the seizure of NTV's airwaves came at 8:06 a.m., when anchor Andrei Norkin was cut off in midsentence as he attempted to explain what had happened when the new managers arrived.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Talks about the future of Russia's only independent nationwide television network crumbled as representatives of the state-run gas company Gazprom rejected a proposal to ask the Supreme Court to determine the legitimacy of its takeover of NTV. NTV insists that Gazprom--the largest shareholder--illegally put its loyalists on the network's board, and its journalists have refused to work for the new leadership.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Reuters
The exiled financier who built Russia's only nationwide independent media group lost control of his empire Friday after being forced to sell shares to the state-dominated natural gas monopoly to cover his debts. Vladimir A. Gusinsky had battled for months to retain his grip on his Media-Most group, which owns Russia's only nationwide independent television network, NTV, against what he has described as a Kremlin plot to stifle critics.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a hard-fought struggle for control of Russia's largest independent media group, the Media-Most company and its supporters accused authorities Tuesday of using blackmail and intimidation to try to gain control of its television network, NTV. The group's best-known journalists and broadcasters told a news conference that the Kremlin wants to control NTV, which is often critical of the government. Former Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
The new chairman of Russia's only independent TV network faced down angry journalists Thursday, dismissing their fears that he might undermine media freedom and insisting that his only goal is to turn a profit. "You can't charge a person with a crime that he hasn't yet committed," said Alfred Kokh, who orchestrated the hostile takeover of Russia's combative NTV network earlier this week. "We haven't quashed freedom of speech, and we don't plan to do so."
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans lined up on both sides of the fight over media freedom in Russia on Wednesday, with Ted Turner confirming an offer to buy a significant stake in the maverick NTV network, while a Los Angeles investment firm acknowledged playing a critical role in giving majority control to Kremlin loyalists. The decisions mean that the fate of NTV, whose exposes and critical war reporting have irked Russian President Vladimir V.
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