Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelevision Industry
IN THE NEWS

Television Industry

ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite self-proclaimed efforts by the television industry to lessen violence amid threats by federal legislators, TV violence actually increased by 41% over the past two years, according to a study released Friday by a nonprofit research organization. The findings were immediately attacked by network officials, who called the study "irresponsible" and inconclusive.
Advertisement
WORLD
January 20, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and John Lee, Los Angeles Times
It is the television show that everybody watches and everybody loves to hate. On Sunday night, the eve of the Chinese New Year, a billion people could tune in for a ritual that is as deeply ingrained in the holiday tradition as watching the Rose Parade is for Americans. The show is CCTV's annual New Year's Gala, a five-hour pastiche of dancing, singing, comedy, magic tricks, propaganda and kitsch. CCTV claims that more than 90% of the Chinese population watches the show (more on that claim later)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2001 | GLORIA TRISTANI
Imagine an America where Native American women do not exist and Latinos are a mere 2% of the population, where there is only one woman for every two men, and where mostly persons of color occupy lower-rung occupations. If you tuned in to prime-time network television during the 2000-01 season, that was the America you saw, according to Children Now, a child policy and advocacy organization ("Diverse Casts on Television Are Still Over the Rainbow," by Greg Braxton, May 1).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Integrating products into plots of television shows is nothing new, but some series are taking it to levels that aren't always pretty and could alienate viewers. That was the case with last week's "New Girl" on Fox. In the episode, Jess (Zooey Deschanel) agrees to fill in for her model friend Cece (Hannah Simone), who is too hung over to properly ogle a new Ford. Jess, who is more of an earthy girl, gets made up and puts on some sky-high heels to prance around in.  She struggles with that, of course, and hilarity is supposed to ensue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | By Meg James
In a bid for Internet buzz, premium cable channels HBO and Showtime have released free premiere episodes online of their highly anticipated summer series, HBO's"The Newsroom"and Showtime's "Weeds" and "Episodes. "  HBO on Monday began offering Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom," which premiered on television Sunday night and drew a respectable 2.7 million viewers.  The pilot episode of the show, which takes a sneering look at modern media, will play on several new-media sites, including HBO.com, YouTube and TV.com.  The television start of "The Newsroom" ranks among HBO's highly watched premieres.  HBO said the outing ranked third behind "Boardwalk Empire" (4.8 million viewers)
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) warned the television industry Tuesday that, if it does not announce satisfactory voluntary changes in its current program-rating guidelines by early next week, he will push for Senate action on measures that could require a content-based system. "We need closure on this issue," McCain, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, said after meeting with representatives from the four major broadcast networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER NOXON, Christopher Noxon is a regular contributor to Calendar
The guest star on medical drama "City of Angels" is playing the part of Mike, a sweet-tempered 7-year-old who is rushed to the hospital with a fractured femur. Splayed out on a gurney with his leg wrapped in bloody gauze, he cringes in pain and moans with each labored breath. Then, with his eyes fixed soulfully in the distance, Mike arches his head forward and gives an attending nurse a long, wet lick.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fries Entertainment, a major supplier of TV movies and one of the last publicly traded independent TV production companies in Hollywood, filed for bankruptcy reorganization Wednesday after years of mounting financial losses. Fries had missed a bond payment earlier this month, leading to acceleration of $29.5 million in bank debt and other possible defaults.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is broadly defined as "sexual content" has become more prevalent on television without any appreciable increase in discussion of potential consequences, though programs tend to be more responsible when teenagers are involved. Those are the central findings of a study presented Tuesday in Beverly Hills by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Menlo Park, Calif., which seeks to prod the media into disseminating safer-sex messages.
SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted CBS sportscaster Brent Musburger told a national television audience Thursday night that the network's decision not to renew his contract was the result of a vendetta against him by CBS Sports President Neal Pilson and executive producer Ted Shaker. Musburger claimed they are "spreading venom" and out to "defame" him. "They conspired to get me out of CBS," Musburger told ABC's Sam Donaldson in an interview broadcast on "PrimeTime Live."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|