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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Film and television industry groups that met with the White House on Thursday evening vowed to engage in a "dialogue" over the issue of gun violence in America.                                                           "The entertainment community appreciates being included in the dialogue around the administration's efforts to confront the complex challenge of gun violence in America," said a statement from the Directors...
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Brad Davis joined the cast of "The Habitation of Dragons," a drama about family and politics in a small Texas town, he had been HIV-positive for six years and had already developed some symptoms of AIDS. But nobody involved with the film knew that. So nobody knew then that the film--which airs tonight at 5, 7 and 9 as part ofcable channel TNT's "Screenworks" series--would be his last.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Fred Katayama, it was a moment of profound inspiration. As a Monterey Park fifth-grader in the early 1970s, he came home from school one afternoon and encountered a figure on television who would change his life. "I ran into the kitchen and I said, 'Mom, there's a Japanese-looking man on TV!' " Katayama recalls. "It was Ken Kashiwahara, who at the time was a reporter for Channel 7 'Eyewitness News.' It was a strong reaction.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
It was, as they say, the end of an era. Lorimar Telepictures Corp. at last was merged Wednesday into the entertainment mammoth Warner Communications Inc. Lorimar, which made its reputation producing "Dallas" and other television series, will survive as a Culver City subsidiary doing what it has always done best: TV. What it has done with notable lack of success--making movies, especially--has been wound down during the many months that the merger has been impending.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With DirecTV's pact Friday to buy PrimeStar, the satellite television industry is on the verge of shrinking to only two players from five just three months ago. Federal regulators have largely driven the consolidation, aiming to strengthen the satellite industry as a challenger to the long-standing monopoly of cable operators. But some consumer advocates and analysts question whether consumers will benefit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Nielsen is rethinking how it measures television viewing. Responding to pressure from the television industry, the ratings company is making a bigger push to measure viewing in a way that reflects the different means by which television content is distributed and consumed in the digital age. The first step for Nielsen is to redefine what it considers a "television home. " Starting this fall, homes that receive content on their television through video-game consoles or through broadband connections will be included in its sample.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER
Master animator and puppeteer Bob Baker this week helped launch a new series at the North Hollywood Library celebrating the television industry. As part of the library's "50th Anniversary of the Emmy Awards Celebration," Baker, who has been a puppeteer and worked on numerous animation projects for more than 60 years, lectured Thursday night on creating animated productions. "Basically, anything that can be moved by man is animation of some sort," Baker said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1996 | MEG INGLIMA, Meg Inglima is a writer and producer. Her e-mail address is: minglima@aol.com
In Greg Braxton's article "NBC's Loss of Minority Roles a Gain to Independents" (Calendar, May 16), Doug Alligood, senior vice president for BBDO Worldwide Inc. (advertising), discusses the move of minority programs to independent networks and says, "Many of the black-oriented shows do not do well with the general population." What "general population" is he talking about and what does he base it on?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite self-proclaimed efforts by the television industry to lessen violence amid threats by federal legislators, TV violence actually increased by 41% over the past two years, according to a study released Friday by a nonprofit research organization. The findings were immediately attacked by network officials, who called the study "irresponsible" and inconclusive.
WORLD
January 20, 2012 | By Barbara Demick and John Lee, Los Angeles Times
It is the television show that everybody watches and everybody loves to hate. On Sunday night, the eve of the Chinese New Year, a billion people could tune in for a ritual that is as deeply ingrained in the holiday tradition as watching the Rose Parade is for Americans. The show is CCTV's annual New Year's Gala, a five-hour pastiche of dancing, singing, comedy, magic tricks, propaganda and kitsch. CCTV claims that more than 90% of the Chinese population watches the show (more on that claim later)
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