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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By Matea Gold and Scott Collins
Michaele and Tareq Salahi were a reality TV producer's dream. Until they became a nightmare. As aspiring cast members of the upcoming Bravo show "The Real Housewives of D.C.," the Virginia couple portrayed themselves as a high-flying duo that could offer a window into Washington's power set. But their brazen crashing of a White House state dinner last month reduced them to attention-craving caricatures, triggering a congressional investigation into...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Scott Collins
Twitter has roughly 6 million users, and probably upward of 99% of their tweets attract absolutely zero attention. But the rules are a little different for the people who make TV shows, as Hart Hanson, creator and executive producer of Fox's forensic comedy-drama "Bones," learned earlier this month. Hanson, an active Twitterer known for his gently ironic on-set updates and affectionate exchanges with the show's hard-core fans, informed readers that his show had shut down production.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The influential lobby group Consumer Electronics Assn. is fighting what appears to be a losing battle to dissuade California regulators from passing the nation's first ban on energy-hungry big-screen televisions. On Tuesday, executives and consultants for the Arlington, Va., trade group asked members of the California Energy Commission to instead let consumers use their wallets to decide whether they want to buy the most energy-saving new models of liquid-crystal display and plasma high-definition TVs. "Voluntary efforts are succeeding without regulations," said Doug Johnson, the association's senior director for technology policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2009 | Scott Collins and Maria Elena Fernandez
"The Jay Leno Show" won't hit the air until next month, but the head of ABC is already taking some none-too-subtle swipes at it. By putting a talk show in the 10 p.m. hour usually reserved for scripted dramas, NBC is "doing their own thing, and the other networks seem to be following in the tradition of putting on great material," Steve McPherson, president of the ABC Entertainment Group, told reporters at the TCA press tour in Pasadena on Saturday afternoon....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2009 | SCOTT COLLINS
During the next month, the broadcast networks are rolling out at least 10 new midseason series. NBC unveiled its epic drama "Kings" last week. Two new ABC sitcoms are coming, "Better Off Ted" this week and "In the Motherhood" next. And Fox has a variety show with the Ozzy Osbourne clan, which, given its erratic history could result in either spontaneous brilliance or spontaneous combustion. Is there a hit somewhere in this bunch? The networks could sure use one.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | SCOTT COLLINS
Now that Gil Grissom has left the building, we can get acquainted with a simple truth: Thursday nights on network TV are totally up for grabs. When William L. Petersen left "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" after more than eight seasons playing the crusty forensics ace Grissom, the dynamics of television's most important night -- when marketers try to hit viewers planning their weekends -- changed yet again. And no one really knows where things will end up.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2008 | Meg James, James is a Times staff writer.
NBC's decision to move Jay Leno to 10 p.m. next fall sends a clear warning to viewers and to Hollywood that the expensive, scripted programs that have dominated prime time for decades may go the way of the Edsel. Only time will tell whether NBC's gambit is a stroke of programming genius or simply a way to avoid pushing the network's biggest star into early retirement -- Leno has long been scheduled to turn over the "Tonight Show" desk to Conan O'Brien in June.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Verrier is a Times staff writer.
When the Canadian dollar dropped to a three-year low last week, Judy Ranan wasted no time getting the message out to Hollywood. "82 cents! 82 cents! 82 cents!" blared the e-mail she sent to 400 studio executives and industry professionals. "Just in case you aren't already aware, the Canadian dollar has dropped significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the past several weeks." Ordinarily, a falling currency would not be something to crow about.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
NBC Universal's local television stations are seeing a "tremendous effect" from the economic climate, though advertising sales haven't been hurt at the national level yet, Chief Executive Jeff Zucker said Friday. The economic downturn in the U.S. has had a "profound effect on our local television stations, whose businesses were highly dependent on auto" industry and retail advertising, Zucker said at a conference in London.
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