Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTelevision Industry
IN THE NEWS

Television Industry

ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | Scott Collins
Twitter has roughly 6 million users, and probably upward of 99% of their tweets attract absolutely zero attention. But the rules are a little different for the people who make TV shows, as Hart Hanson, creator and executive producer of Fox's forensic comedy-drama "Bones," learned earlier this month. Hanson, an active Twitterer known for his gently ironic on-set updates and affectionate exchanges with the show's hard-core fans, informed readers that his show had shut down production.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 14, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The influential lobby group Consumer Electronics Assn. is fighting what appears to be a losing battle to dissuade California regulators from passing the nation's first ban on energy-hungry big-screen televisions. On Tuesday, executives and consultants for the Arlington, Va., trade group asked members of the California Energy Commission to instead let consumers use their wallets to decide whether they want to buy the most energy-saving new models of liquid-crystal display and plasma high-definition TVs. "Voluntary efforts are succeeding without regulations," said Doug Johnson, the association's senior director for technology policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2009 | Scott Collins and Maria Elena Fernandez
"The Jay Leno Show" won't hit the air until next month, but the head of ABC is already taking some none-too-subtle swipes at it. By putting a talk show in the 10 p.m. hour usually reserved for scripted dramas, NBC is "doing their own thing, and the other networks seem to be following in the tradition of putting on great material," Steve McPherson, president of the ABC Entertainment Group, told reporters at the TCA press tour in Pasadena on Saturday afternoon....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2009 | SCOTT COLLINS
During the next month, the broadcast networks are rolling out at least 10 new midseason series. NBC unveiled its epic drama "Kings" last week. Two new ABC sitcoms are coming, "Better Off Ted" this week and "In the Motherhood" next. And Fox has a variety show with the Ozzy Osbourne clan, which, given its erratic history could result in either spontaneous brilliance or spontaneous combustion. Is there a hit somewhere in this bunch? The networks could sure use one.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
NBC Universal said Tuesday that it was abandoning its spring ritual of unveiling the network's fall schedule in an expensive, star-studded presentation at Radio City Music Hall in favor of smaller meetings with advertisers in three cities, including Los Angeles. "We are taking what has been a one-way conversation and turning it into a two-way dialogue with advertisers," said Marc Graboff, co-chairman of NBC Entertainment.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2008 | From Reuters
Walt Disney Co. has reached a deal to more than double its stake in Indian TV and movie content maker UTV, the two firms said, underscoring the U.S. entertainment firm's efforts to expand globally. Disney will raise its holding in UTV Software Communications Ltd. to 32.1%, the same level as UTV's founders, from 14.9%, by acquiring 9.35 million shares for 8.05 billion rupees ($203 million).
BUSINESS
February 4, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
This was going to be the CW's breakthrough year. The little TV network was full of promise five months ago on the eve of its second season. Advertisers and even curmudgeonly TV critics were gushing over its new fall shows. Buzz on the Internet was wild in anticipation of the much-hyped "Gossip Girl," a soapy drama about pampered prep school students in Manhattan. But instead of catching fire, the CW's new crop of shows flickered in the ratings.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Conceding that the current television season cannot be salvaged, four major studios canceled dozens of writer contracts Monday. The move signals that development of next season's crop of new shows also could be in jeopardy because of the 2-month-old writers strike. Typically, January marks the start of pilot season when networks order new comedies and dramas. But with writers not working, networks do not have a pool of scripts from which to choose.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2008 | Alex Pham and Joseph Menn and Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writers
Television manufacturers showed off their biggest and brightest models at the Consumer Electronics Show on Monday. And wow, were they big and bright. Panasonic lugged in the world's largest plasma TV set, at 150 inches, or 12 1/2 feet, measured diagonally. It's 11 feet tall, for those already measuring space in their living rooms. "The only plane that could carry it was the Boeing 747 jumbo jet," Panasonic President Toshihiro Sakamoto said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|