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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley is in for the party of the century on Dec. 31, according to Mayor Richard Riordan. The family-oriented, free festival is expected to attract 100,000 to Van Nuys Airport, where city officials promised kids' programs, bands and other entertainment before a spectacular fireworks and laser show at midnight, marking the start of the year 2000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1999 | PAULA SPAN, WASHINGTON POST
A groan goes up from the teenagers clinging to a dusty traffic island in the middle of Times Square: Apparently MTV, whose glass-walled studio they've been peering up toward in hopes of waving to their friends at home, isn't shooting outdoors this afternoon. "We risked our lives just to get here and be on MTV," wails Cynthia Hempel, 16, of Connecticut, as cars and smelly buses stream past, inches from her toes.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1999 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the cooling-off of Southern California's entertainment economy, shooting on the streets of Los Angeles dipped sharply last year as tighter spending sliced into film, TV and commercial production. The numbers released Friday by Entertainment Industry Development Corp., which issues permits for about 80% of the shooting done in Los Angeles County, show an overall drop of 4% in production days, or days spent shooting in areas of Los Angeles outside of sound stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Carter, creator and executive producer of "The X-Files," is close to putting his "X" on the dotted line to return to the eerie drama for two more seasons. Carter had said a year ago that he might not return after the Fox drama's fifth season, which just ended. He said he wanted to finish "The X-Files" movie and help with the series' transition from Vancouver, its home base for five seasons, to Los Angeles, before making a final decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Fade in. Exterior, day. Jerry's apartment building. Jerry's fellow tenants are coming home from a shopping trip. "Ayudeme con los Pampers." "Mira, no tengo llave." "Ay . . . ni yo tampoco!" Laughter up. Applause. Yada, yada, yada. * I have seen "Seinfeld" twice: Once, because everyone else in the home where I was a guest was watching it, and a second time when I was chained to a wall in an Argentine prison. OK, I lied about the prison. All I'm saying is, I wasn't struck by sitcom lightning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1997 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drive out past the grasshopper wells, past the lemon orchards, up toward Ojai, and you enter another world: Santa Ventura Studios. There, tucked away in the old Mills School, actors, directors and producers scurry from one set to another. Makeup artists paint faces and editors sit before giant TV screens, cutting and clipping.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
The Greater Oxnard Economic Development Corp. is starting a major campaign to attract lucrative entertainment-industry productions to the area. As part of the campaign, the EDC is compiling a guidebook of Oxnard sites for television and movie producers, as well as building Web pages to profile those locations. The Web site also will have information about the permit process, and companies interested in filming in Oxnard will be able to complete and submit their permit applications online.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | Susan King
NORTHERN EXPOSURE Seattle is the locale for NBC's hit Emmy Award-winning comedy "Frasier." The city was also the location for the 1968-70 ABC series "Here Come the Brides." In fact, Perry Como scored a hit with the series' theme song, "Seattle." Josh Brand and John Falsey's acclaimed 1987-88 NBC drama series "A Year in the Life" also was set in Seattle. MOVERS Some sitcoms changed locales during their run.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | Robin Rauzi, Robin Rauzi is a Times staff writer
Half of America does not live in Los Angeles or New York. Except on TV. There was a time when a young woman tried to make it in the big city--and the big city was Minneapolis. Extended families fought over their fortunes in Dallas or Denver. Two roommates sought love and success--in Milwaukee. These days, however, prime-time TV has largely abandoned Middle America. This season, for example, there are 24 network series set in New York and 16 in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The producer for the 70th annual Academy Awards is due to be named any day now and the rumored favorite is veteran Gilbert Cates, who has produced the three-hour-plus extravaganza seven of the last eight years--and won an Emmy Award for the 1991 show. As always, whoever gets the job is in for a lot of hard work--and a lot of Tuesday morning quarterbacking.
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