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NEWS
October 23, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The clock. 7:37.13 a.m. CBS producer Janet Leissner is checking out of the Toledo Hilton on four hours' sleep. Six dollars for a doughnut and coffee. Wake up correspondent Bob Schieffer. Load two camera crews into their spots in George Bush's campaign motorcade, and off into the Ohio drizzle. So it begins, again. There are moments, in the spaces between the exhaustion and the adrenaline, when one can feel the phantom that haunts this presidential race.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2010
Television viewers were probably exposed to more political ads last month than ever before. The Nielsen Co. said Friday that nearly 1.48 million political ads aired on local broadcast stations in October. That's more than any other month since Nielsen began collecting that data in 2000. Nielsen spokesman Aaron Lewis said the company is confident that there was no bigger number before that. The previous high was 1.41 million ads in October 2008, a presidential election year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Had Palm Springs Mayor Sonny Bono chosen to run for the Republican nomination for U.S. senator in any previous year, his candidacy could have created problems for California television stations. They could have been required to provide equal time to his opponents whenever the former entertainer popped up in an old movie or series rerun. But that won't happen in 1992. Under revised regulations that the Federal Communications Commission put into effect Jan.
WORLD
April 16, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It was the dawn, one writer said, of "the American age in British politics." For the first time in this country's history, the candidates for prime minister squared off in televised debates Thursday, adding a bit of presidential-style zing to what is shaping up as the closest election in a generation. Election day is May 6. For 90 minutes, the three men in dark suits and white shirts made their pitches, live and uncensored, for why they deserved to lead the nation. They sparred over the economy, they talked tough on crime, they tried to outdo one another in their admiration for British soldiers in Afghanistan.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
It has been big but not easy. This GOP convention was supposed to do so many things for George Bush--renew his message and launch his campaign for the fall--and much depended on the work behind the scenes to ensure that the television networks delivered it the party's way. For most of this week, the alarm of problems grew louder. And candidate Bush was left to do much of the work of his whole convention in a single speech, one the media quickly declared splendid.
NEWS
November 7, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Dan Rather sits on the set of "As the World Turns" in the center of a red, gray, blue and lavender temporary newsroom. And in small TV sets built into all four walls, Rather's image is repeated 106 times, instant replay's version of peripheral vision. "We'll have more details on that as the evening rolls along," Rather says, "and see whether Michael Dukakis, with 241 electoral votes, can get the winning number 270."
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
The media in the back of the plane were snarling about never getting to the candidate, the protective skein of handlers in the middle compartment was playing liar's poker and in the very front sat Dan Quayle, safely alone with his thoughts in his flying cocoon. Then the plane landed, the journalists rushed off to file the handout of the last speech and the candidate and his Secret Service guards raced off into the Washington night.
NEWS
August 15, 1988 | DAVID SHAW, Times Staff Writer
"Television is a medium that encourages a certain sense of appealing sterility," says Albert Hunt, Washington bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal. "Television . . . gives added importance to the sort of easygoing, relaxed, stable, calm . . . personality," says political consultant Douglas Bailey. Television is "far and away" the most important factor in a political campaign, says former Sen. Gary Hart, unsuccessful Democratic candidate for President. Why is television all-powerful?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Talk is cheap this election campaign. In the South Jamaica section of Queens, N.Y., so is life. South Jamaica is one of those frayed pockets of society where political rhetoric clashes with reality, where the promises of George Bush and Michael Dukakis are like wind breezing through the trees, where people are shot dead in the streets in fewer seconds than it takes for a candidate to blast his opponent in a TV sound bite. The PBS special "Promises! Promises!"
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Who will win the vice presidential debate tonight? What does Republican Dan Quayle need to do? Or Democrat Lloyd Bentsen? Who cares? Something strange is going on. Even the political media right now, particularly network television, seem sick of the campaign--and the campaigners--for President. Of late, both campaigns have had trouble making news on network TV, and when they have, the stories have been laced with a weary anger about the candidates' negativism and lack of substance.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2008 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
New York Tim Russert, the longest-serving moderator of NBC's "Meet the Press" and the lion of the Washington press corps, died of a sudden heart attack Friday. He was 58. Russert had returned early from a family trip to Italy and was working at NBC's Washington bureau, recording voice-overs for Sunday's show, when he collapsed Friday afternoon. His wife, Maureen Orth, a writer for Vanity Fair, and their son, Luke, were still in Italy, where they had been celebrating Luke's graduation from Boston College.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007 | Joe Conason, Special to The Times
WHY do our leaders feel that they can speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth only after they have left politics? After spending nearly half his life in public office, from which he was separated involuntarily in the 2000 election, Al Gore knows the answer. As he explains in his new book, the American political system has degenerated into a rigged game that suppresses honesty and rewards deception.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2007 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
IT was Tuesday morning on "The View" and Elisabeth Hasselbeck was outnumbered, again. That's not unusual on ABC's tumultuous daytime coffee klatch, which has emerged as a pop culture staple this season with its freewheeling showdowns on subjects as varied as premarital chastity and prewar intelligence failures. The topic this time: Don Imus and the slur he used to describe the Rutgers University women's basketball team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2002 | Steve Lopez
We've been here before, haven't we? Two days away from another election, we feel insulted, soiled, numb, patronized. Lobotomized. We can't imagine how such insipid candidates for California governor are spawned, and I don't know about you, but I'd rather have car doors slammed on my fingers than be forced to watch another loathsome TV ad. Those who do vote -- the shrinking minority who haven't had all sense of civic duty beaten out of us -- will probably cast a ballot for the lesser of evils.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2002 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could cast a dozen Hollywood blockbusters with the celebrities who never did "Politically Incorrect With Bill Maher." The show, which debuted on Comedy Central on July 25, 1993 (guests on the first broadcast were Jerry Seinfeld, Larry Miller, Robin Quivers and Ed Rollins), moved to ABC in 1996. It was canceled a month ago, to be replaced weeknights at 12:05 a.m. with a show hosted by Jimmy Kimmel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2002 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Press, the former KABC talk radio host and chairman of the California State Democratic Party who has been arguing the "left" side of issues on CNN's "Crossfire," is being replaced by former Clinton insiders James Carville and Paul Begala. The two one-time advisors and political strategists for President Clinton will rotate in the job at the venerable political debate show.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Staging a political convention is a little like setting explosives--once the fuse is lit, things happen pretty fast. The party professionals can do a lot in advance. They can angle the klieg lights for the proper corona. They can try to "spin" the way reporters view the story. They can even teach southpaw George Bush to gesture with his right hand.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
If television news so far this week is any indication, Michael S. Dukakis may have trouble sustaining momentum in his attack on George Bush for what he sees as dirty campaign tactics. And the reasons say something about television and how to manipulate it. On Monday, Dukakis had one of his strongest days in months on the evening network news.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2000 | PAUL FARHI, WASHINGTON POST
She has opinions, so many opinions, delivered straight into the hungry eye of the television camera. Here is Heather Nauert talking about school shootings on PBS' "To the Contrary." And there she is yakking about politics on "Politically Incorrect." And on Fox News Channel, she's lambasting "the heinous tax system in this country." The presidential election, Elian Gonzalez, gun control, foreign policy, the latest Dixie Chicks video--she weighs in on it all.
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