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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Reuven Frank was the night city editor of New Jersey's Newark Evening News when he got a call from a pal, Gerald Green, at NBC's television news division. Want to work at NBC?, Green asked. "No," Frank replied. Green, later to write the best-selling novel "The Last Angry Man," got mad. He badgered Frank to give NBC a try. Frank finally did, as a writer. Frank's try, which among other things led to two tours as president of NBC News, has lasted 38 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Cindy Chang and Joseph Serna
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department acknowledged Thursday that its deputies mistakenly shot and killed an aspiring TV producer earlier this week while responding to a stabbing and hostage standoff in West Hollywood. Sheriff's officials said deputies believed John Winkler, 30, was the attacker when they encountered him at a Palm Avenue apartment complex Monday night. In fact, he was one of three hostages being held inside an apartment by a man with a knife. Winkler was shot in the chest when he rushed out of the apartment with one of the other victims, sheriff's officials said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year Helen Keller Park was so lifeless and desolate that locals referred to it as a graveyard. Financial troubles forced cancellation of its baseball program, and the Athens park became the realm of what locals called "the negative element.' "When baseball stopped, the gang-bangers and drug dealers took over," said longtime area resident Marvo Hider, recalling the groups of young men who gathered near the playground to drink malt liquor, play dominoes and deal dope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Cindy Chang and Ruben Vives
Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies mistakenly shot and killed an aspiring TV producer earlier this week while responding to a stabbing and hostage standoff in West Hollywood, officials said Thursday. Sheriff's officials said deputies believed John Winkler, 30, was the attacker when they encountered him at a Palm Avenue apartment complex Monday night. In fact, he was one of three hostages being held inside an apartment by a man with a knife. Three deputies shot Winkler when he rushed out of the apartment with one of the other victims, sheriff's officials said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
KNBC-TV Channel 4 plans to shuffle the producers of two of its afternoon newscasts, promoting two minorities into positions formerly dominated by white males. Beginning Sept. 5, Serena Cha will head up the 6 p.m. news and Ernie Arboles, formerly an Emmy Award-winning producer at KCBS-TV Channel 2, will oversee the 4 p.m. broadcast. Cha, an Asian-American, replaces Bill Sorensen, who will be moved into the producer slot on the station's early morning newscast, "Today in L.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The press-release warfare between actress Delta Burke and the producers of "Designing Women" intensified Monday even as production began on the CBS sitcom's fourth season. In the latest barrage, executive producers Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Harry Thomason released 12 pages of statements from co-star Dixie Carter and other people connected with the show rebutting Burke's claims last week that the producers were unsupportive and abusive to her.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Strong ratings for the three recent Amy Fisher movies guarantee continued TV splurging on docudramas about sensational, bizarre crimes. The biggest problem facing producers, though, is how to come up with fresh material to dramatize. After all, there are only so many sensational, bizarre crimes, and the parties involved in those that do occur are inevitably swept up in frenzied bidding wars for their screen rights. It gets messy. What to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1996 | ROBERT STRAUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
NBC Entertainment President Warren Littlefield tried to put on as much drama as he could standing on the stage at Avery Fisher Hall in Manhattan's Lincoln Center arts complex. Several thousand advertisers, media members and network employees had gathered there Monday afternoon for the presentation of the network's fall prime-time lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major television producer known for his gritty series about crime and justice has an idea rolling around in his head for a one-hour series called "eight-something" or "ninesomething." Another veteran producer known for dealing frankly with social and sexual issues in his comedies is developing a series for children bout a pirate TV station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department acknowledged Thursday that its deputies mistakenly shot and killed a aspiring TV producer they thought was a stabbing suspect. In fact, John Winkler, 30, had gone to a neighbor's apartment Monday night on Palm Avenue in West Hollywood where a man was holding people hostage and tried to help. Winkler was shot when he rushed out of the apartment with another victim who had been trapped inside the apartment with a third victim and the suspect, sheriff's officials said in a statement.
HEALTH
March 14, 2014 | By Emily Dwass
Television producer and writer Jason Katims is known for tackling emotional stories. Even his new NBC comedy, "About a Boy," deals with bullying and depression. But family challenges are most apparent in his dramas, especially "Parenthood," finishing its fifth season on NBC, for which Katims sometimes draws on his own experiences. On "Parenthood," the character Max Braverman (played by Max Burkholder) is a child struggling with the autism spectrum disorder Asperger's syndrome. As the father of a son with this developmental disorder, what has it been like to tell that story?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before remembering to record Jimmy Fallon tonight. The Skinny: I'm three episodes into "House of Cards. " Unlike other folks, I'm perfectly happy taking my time to get through it. Now if I had the rest of HBO's "True Detective" available to me it'd be another story. Today is a holiday for a lot of you so we'll make this fast. Our roundup includes a look at the holiday box office weekend. Also, more deep thoughts on Comcast's proposed takeover of Time Warner Cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
On the eve of contract negotiations with the studios, the Writers Guild of America said employers are seeking big cuts in healthcare benefits and pay. The guild said opening proposals from the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers contained $60 million in "rollbacks for writers," including cuts in the union's health and pension plans, as well as reductions in pay rates for screenplays and TV residuals. "Are you surprised? We were," Chip Johannessen and Billy Ray, co-chairs of the union's negotiating committee, wrote in a letter to members.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before making my Super Bowl pick. The Skinny: I have not decided who to root for in Sunday's Super Bowl. It will literally be a game day decision. Send me who you think I should cheer on. Friday's roundup includes the weekend box office preview as well as stories on Rep. Henry Waxman's retirement, the upcoming Writers Guild contract talks and the debate over the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences decision to strip a song of its Oscar nomination.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Studios say they will support efforts by the Writers Guild of America to ensure that screenwriters are paid on time. The Writers Guild of America, West announced this week that it was working with talent agents on a joint project to "address the chronic problem of late payment to screenwriters" to "change the culture of late pay that persists in Hollywood. " The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, which represents the major film and television studios, expressed support Thursday for the union's so-called late-pay initiative.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994 | RICK DU BROW
On the verge of wrapping up its third consecutive prime-time ratings championship next weekend, CBS is hoping for some new program magic from two women who helped the network reach the top rung.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The TV networks appear to have stumbled across a means by which aging sitcoms can at least temporarily expand their audience--with the operative phrase being "Let's get serious." While prime-time comedies have a lengthy history of delving into social issues, a fairly recent trend has seen shows like "Home Improvement," "Mad About You," "Roseanne" and "Grace Under Fire" explore darker matters or personal tragedies ranging from family illness to marital strife.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The Directors Guild of America announced that its members have ratified a new three-year contract with the major studios. The DGA did not disclose ballot results, but said Wednesday morning its members voted by an "overwhelming majority" to ratify the new contract, which covers 15,000 directors and their teams who work in film and television. The agreement with Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers includes a 3% annual wage increase, higher residual payments, and improvements in basic cable pay. It also establishes minimum terms and conditions for high-budget new media productions for video on demand services and creates a formal diversity program at every major television studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Shogun," "The Winds of War," "Game of Thrones" and "Under the Dome" are just a few titles in the library of highly regarded novels that have been adapted for television. And then there's "The Spoils of Babylon," the sprawling 22-hour miniseries with an all-star cast based on the massive novel by self-proclaimed "undisputed master of dramatic fiction" Eric Jonrosh. Filmed during the 1970s when "novels for television" were all the rage, "The Spoils of Babylon" revolved around the oil-rich Morehouse family and was packed with scenes of betrayal, greed and forbidden love.
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